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  5. "现在两点整。"

"现在两点整。"

Translation:It's two o'clock sharp.

November 26, 2017

75 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexTse3

We don't really say "sharp" in English. Maybe "exactly" would be better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Some people do. I think it's more of an older generation thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phill858962

I might say sharp if specifying a future appointment or something similar but not when describing the present moment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/William_Avery

Its exactly right that "sharp" is generally used in warnings such as "You need to be there by ..." or "I will be leaving at..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

Good point. Have a Lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/purplelotus88

?? What a weird thing to say. It is absolutely still used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

"Exactly" is now accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorGrayMoore

Its archaic English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eoin790683

No it isn't. It's fairly commonly used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnTurnbu7

That is how I use "sharp" as a native English speaker. Means exactly, no being a few minutes late.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mohamed710700

I added you as a friend


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hung130268

What does the translation mean? It should be: now it's 2 O'clock??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swansae

整 here literally means "complete". We are saying "it's exactly 2 o'clock."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidEllio14

It means at exactly two o'clock However we normally use it to mean an exact time to meet up such as: I'll meet you at two o'clock sharp.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidEllio14

It means its exactly two o'clock


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanSavage31

I thought it would just be 2 o clock sharp, but now I learned that if there is not a subject for the time, usually it will translate to "it" or "it's."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neil_05

"It is 2:00 sharp" should be accepted as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrisf498217

I think 'sharp' is usually only used when arranging a time... "see you at 3pm sharp", not when reporting a time... "It's exactly 3pm"


[deactivated user]

    It's two o 'clock exactly. Was NOT accepted. 整 zhěng also means exact.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickSchmitt255

    Should 'It is two o'clock on the dot' be accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    Good translation. Suggest it!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryf-Reto

    Reading all blog entries here, I notice a lot of cultural differences in the english speaking world. I suggest that DL accepts other translations than "sharp".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    OED defines ‘sharp’ (in this context) as “precisely at the time specified”; it defines ‘exactly’ in a more general sense meaning “accurately, precisely ...”. I wonder if 整 has than sense of “exactly (and precisely) at the time named, with a particular attention to the punctuality”. If it does, then ‘sharp’ is the appropriate translation. If not, then “it is now exactly two o’clock” or “it is now precisely two o’clock”, or even just “it is now two o’clock” would do. “It is now two o’clock precisely” has a particular cultural meaning, as the old British speaking clock used that format: “At the third stroke it will be two o’clock precisely … beep, beep, beep.”


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brettah31

    Never have I ever heard 整 used that way :S


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHsuan1

    Nor have I heard sharp used this way.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adurkin88

    It used to be used a lot and is still used in some English-speaking countries.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/umikujira

    it is just 2 o'clock now


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChipD8

    "now" is better than "sharp" in this case.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

    @Chip - it is not necessarily "now". Imagine someone asking "What is the time the meeting is scheduled for tomorrow?"; and the answer "It's 2 o' clock sharp". i.e. it is not now, but tomorrow.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louis282791

    Should "It's two o'clock" be accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

    No, they want you to learn that 整 is used here to specify 2:00 "exactly/ sharp/ on the dot"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

    Annoyingly it doesn't accept "on the dot".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marin470782

    The last time I was asked to translate this sentence 'two o'clock sharp' was marked wrong. So this time I just said '2:00' and that was also marked wrong.????


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    I just did this same question twice and “It’s now 2 o’clock sharp” was accepted; as was “it’s now exactly 2 o’clock”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    Sorry you had a hard time, here is the lingot, which I hope helps to make up for it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WIMDispa

    I do not understand the word "sharp".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamBro541773

    Why is it is now two o'clock precisely not accepted? Never heard sharp unless your speaking about a deadline or something


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laura844799

    "it's two o'clock sharp" yeah as opposed to two o'clock blunt?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

    No it's two o'clock sharp as opposed to two i'lock sharp.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/da2cnt

    むずかしいね


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plchng

    The right answer should be: It is now two o'clock. The clue is misleading!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.B.Honeydew

    I don't understand why this is using 两. We are taught that 两 is used like "a pair" in English, thus when having 2 with a MEASURE WORD. Here 点 is NOT a measure word, it's a precise time. So why isn't this 现在二点整? 两点 should refer to an INTERVAL of two hours, not a clock time. Can someone explain?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily41907

    2 o'clock is 2 o'clock FFS!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

    @Richard - marvellous information. Thanks for the update.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marin470782

    where is 'sharp' implied in the Chinese? This just means 'now it's 2:00.'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CinnamonTe1

    o'clock sharp = 整 (zheng) o'clock = 钟 (zhong)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrsCarolyn1

    This should be It's two o'clock on the dot. We only say sharp when we are talking about a future arrangement.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lily41907

    The "sharp" is totally out of place FFS!!! NOT necessary!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

    @Richard - that's excellent news.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryf-Reto

    it is zwo o'clock means "exactly two hours zero minutes", the sharp is surplus


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryf-Reto

    0'clock sharp is a pleonasm. o'clock means exactly or sharp


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    I disagree. “Sharp” intensifies and exactly specifies the time reference.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryf-Reto

    xx o'clock means xx:00 so it is sharp (this was the explication of my english teacher). It is not correct to use o'clock for other times than xx:00


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    “I’ll see you at 10:00” - five minutes either side isn’t an issue.
    “I’ll see you at 10:00 sharp” - if you aren’t there you’ll miss the party.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    But so much is context. “The train leaves at 11:03”. No need to add “sharp”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    “The train leaves at 11 o’clock.” “Is that 11 o’clock sharp?” “No - three minutes past”.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    “The train leaves at 11 o’clock.” “My train arrives at 11.01 - will I be able to catch it?” “No, it leaves at 11 o’clock sharp”


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    “The train leaves at 11 o’clock.” “My train arrives at 11.01 - will I be able to catch it?” “Yes - the exact time it leaves is 11:05.”


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edzilla2

    Who says this


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Punchabear1

    Suggested "It's 2 o'clock now." Adding "sharp" is an odd and specific translation.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marin470782

    no one says 'sharp' in English


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    Well, in British English, yes they do.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/purplelotus88

    What English? In America, it is definitely used. Too many millenials and zoomers in the forums here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris349250

    Sharp was not a choice. These exercises are really badly constructed


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisLeverette

    It is 2 sharp right now. It is 2 sharp. These should also be accepted. For consistency, this lesson should either always or never require "O'clock".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karoliina765050

    There are approximately 9675928370598598 more or less correct ways of saying this in English and DL accepts about three of them. Can you PLEASE fix that?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LlamaScota

    Actually, there are 9675928370598599 ways (sharp).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SimonSprin1

    The course is free! Submit alternative answers.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jinjanodwan

    "Sharp" is completely unnecessary as well as being redundant. Reported.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveLommen

    It is not. The addition is used in English to indicate an exact time.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Handrisuselo

    "Sharp" does exist in English, but you can also omit it.

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