1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Chinese
  4. >
  5. "往前面走。"

"往前面走。"

Translation:Walk towards the front.

November 27, 2017

66 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samertabbal

"Keep walking straight ahead" is more accurate than "Keep going straight ahead". It shouldn't be a wrong answer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Swansae

report it as a right answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malkeynz

Where is the sense of "keep/continue" coming from?

Also, Pimsleur uses 一直往前走 (yī zhí wǎng qián zǒu) for "go straight ahead". Can someone explain the difference? Which sounds more natural?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adtse

I speak Cantonese fluently (CBC) and am wondering the same thing. I don't get this sense at all. To me, it sounds like "go straight ahead". I can't read all that much though (only a few hundred characters), and admittedly Cantonese is quite different from written Chinese. Still...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan946894

2020.6.23
May I ask what is a CBC? Is that anti-ABC as in China-born or does the first C stand for Canadian?

你明唔明白我嘅意思?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimi82958

yeah, i think "go straight ahead" would be the correct context-free translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlegSkydiv

Do not ask about a sense, just say the way as native speakers say. In English speaking countries people say "keep going this way (this direction, ahead, straight ahead).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clwebb

"Carry straight on" is my instinct as a British English-speaker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorLSho

I put "Walk towards the front".

I have no idea why this is wrong and the accepted answer, "Keep going straight ahead", is correct. Where does the idea of a continued action appear in the sentence (Malkeynz's comment)? Would "Go straight ahead" be considered incorrect because it doesn't imply an action that's sustained?

I'm hesitant to mark this as a bad question because I'm very new to the language and, for all I know, the question could be illustrating a very important grammatical rule.

Could someone with some Mandarin-chops please weigh-in on the questions I've raised?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickTrentin88

I'm no native English speaker, but to me translating it as 'the front' would require an object.. i.e. 'the building's front' or 'in front of you'.. For as much as I was taught in my English classes, 'go straight ahead' was always the only translation I was ever given for such thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonDerrick1

There might be a sentence that you would want to translate as "Walk towards the front (of that building)" which would have a very different meaning than "Walk straight"; rather than being straight ahead, the "front" in question could be located to your side or even behind you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gastlygengar

"Keep straight ahead" was wrong. Is it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimi82958

i'm not 100% sure but shall be correct as it is spoken


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BulaienHate

I said keep straight, was wrong i think it has something to do with the 走 at the end giving it that more verbyness we're missing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frank685746

I don't understand why "Walk towards the front" is wrong. The "correct" answer is given as "Walk towards the front side". It has accepted "Walk towards the left/right" for previous answers. Colour me puzzled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarboniteO2neg

"Walk towards the front" should also be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ensezu

that was so strange, i barely understood it compared to the other comments here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richard711603

When do you know to use 'straight ahead' versus 'in front'? Could this also mean 'go toward the front'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimi82958

pls check taylorsho's thread


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/niko729526

"Walk towards the front " should be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michelle911718

"Keep straight ahead" should be acceptable. People say it all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnarnold

There is no front side! If it is in the front then it is not on the side. Should be "Walk to the front" or "Go to the front."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Looks like they've changed the default answer. However, "front side" may be questionable but it's not exactly wrong. If we allow that a cube (or rectangular cuboid) has six sides, a.k.a. faces, and the one facing us, or facing in some direction so as to be designated the "front", is the front face, then it's also the front side.

Anyway, literally the Chinese is "toward front-face go/walk", which can be translated as "go towards the front" or "go straight ahead".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Remwhy

Duolingo PLEASE change the answer, "front side" is linguistic nonsense! If someone said this to me i would have no idea what they meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clwebb

"go straight on" got rejected?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wbeeman

Go toward the front should be a possible translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimi82958

sounds wrong standalone, but contextually could be correct (i.e. front of sth)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pablo608833

Two native Mandarin speakers said this translates as "walk to the font" They did not see why the word "side" is required. "Walk to the front" looks like it should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmichailides

Front side? Cmon now....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaynaLThompson

I put "Walk forward" and it was marked correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WouterManh

can "walk towards the front" be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete327790

If we want to accept US English answers, we might want to allow "toward" for "towards" (https://www.grammarly.com/blog/toward-towards/). (As you might guess, I'm a native US English speaker, so was surprised to have "toward" rejected.) Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Remwhy

In english "Walk to the front side" is meaningless and confusing. Are you asking to walk in front of me or asking to walk straight ahead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidWake2

What exactly does that mean in English? I am a native speaker and it's not clear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

An equally accurate (and more likely) translation of the Chinese is "go straight ahead", but "walk towards the front" could mean walk toward the front of whatever thing we're talking about, like the front of a crowd facing a stage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ViditKatlana

Can someone please explain how this sentence trnslates?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

"Toward front-face walk", or "往 [going towards] 前 [front] 面 [face/side/aspect] 走 [walk/go/proceed]".


[deactivated user]

    Tried straight ahead... Should be accepted. Because how do you translate straight ahead in Chinese


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ExtremeDabber420

    "Keep Ahead" makes sense to me, am I correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mega_Shark

    Why not simply "Keep straight ahead"? Should be a valid answer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    no, it should be "Go straight ahead" or "keep going straight"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catiegee

    I think that 'walk straight ahead' should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinCase734306

    What about "keep straight ahead"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    no, it should be "Go straight ahead" or "keep going straight"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fS4EI4nF

    ❤❤❤❤ English


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanTheFit

    if "Walk towards the front" is correct, then "walk toward the front" is also correct.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    "walk toward the front" is the wrong verb tense


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanTheFit

    If "Walk towards the front side" is correct then "Walk toward the front" is also correct


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    "walk toward the front" is the wrong verb tense. that little s makes the difference.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KennethVog1

    Why not, "Walk straight forward"???


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    please walk straight ahead is much more natural. nobody says, please walk to the front. it is grammatically inaccurate because the front would be a preposition. so the question is to the front of what?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    again, this is wrong. it is not correct or natural to say, please walk to the front without saying to the front of what?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    please walk towards the front is wrong. if you use Front as a preposition then where is the noun?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elijah.Fung

    Walk towards up ahead 这样行吗?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elijah.Fung

    Walk up ahead 也不行


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    neither are really natural. Walk straight ahead or walk forward are better


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LightKnigh4

    Walk towards the front?? Hopefully "go ahead" (though ambigeous, but we do understand the Chinese anyhow, that's what matters) is accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McInnifer

    Is the meaning of this sentence, "walk forward (to your front, like the front of yourself)"? If so, is this the natural way someone would phrase this in Mandarin?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/McInnifer

    Like, "Walk front-wards"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hhif12

    Go walk straight ahead (I put walk just because there's 走 in it, I usually just say "go straight ahead"). but it's wrong anyway.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OlegSkydiv

    I exosted my fantasy with DL English..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael251895

    WALK STRAIGHT AHEAD


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael251895

    "Walk straight ahead" works!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJWentworth

    I was given the "correct" answer as "go straight", which isn't natural sounding English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

    "Go straight." as a command is natural sounding in English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hank905274

    go straight is informal spoken. to be grammatically correct say "Go straight ahead"

    Learn Chinese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.