"A novembre apriamo la marmellata."

Translation:In November we open the jam.

March 15, 2013

27 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

Yup- that's one exciting November we have planned!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dmmaus

Mmm... jam and sausages..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MollyKR

I heard "abbiamo" and transcribed this as "A novembre abbiamo la marmellata."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bettemc

I also heard "abbiamo"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/syterth

Can someone explain the different forms of 'in" and their uses/relations to words. It isn't very clear to me.

For example:

I've seen "in aprile"

or "a novembre"

"ad aprile"

Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryoukon.

learning too, but "a" is used before a consonant and "ad" before a vowel


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JIS9E

When would we use "a" and when would we use "in"? We have had exercises with both. How is "an November" different from "in November"? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneUtz

Would like to know that, too, please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dinkdomino

Having to remember that Americans call jam 'jelly' as well as translating the Italian here... Multilingual :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pataglu

In France, there's "confiture" for jam, "marmelade" for marmalade and "gelée" for jelly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

I believe Italian does have confettura for jam/jelly/confection. But not sure if it's commonly used for what I think of as jam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luna892935

Yess!! It depends by the fruit! If I don't wrong I think confettura is only for the oranges but I am not sure....or the contrary, the other fruits


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mstone01501

To make things even more confusing, we also have preserves and marmalade. AND there is a difference to each.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

Actually, jam and jelly are different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carbis

I think you can get away with jam now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Soglio

In US English, jelly, jam, and preserves are three different types of sugared fruit. Technically, jelly is translucent and made from the clear juice of the fruit. Jam is made from the crushed fruit. Preserves have chunks of the fruit, or even the whole fruit. Those are the technical distinctions. In actuality, many people use the terms interchangeably, or blur the distinctions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elon_the_Hittite

Blur and The Jam were good bands.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ekzunakka

Well, we also call it jam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

So, I wonder whether there's a word for chutney?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mstone01501

In America, we have jam, jelly and preserves. All are different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

Nope! In the USA, we use "jelly" for a clear, strained fruit spread. "Jam" always has pieces of fruit in it. "Marmellade" is made from any kind of citrus with strips of rind included.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tarek233738

Marmellata, molto zucchero, non bene!! Spiacente!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gringoton

So marmellata translates as jam and jelly, but not as preserves or marmalade? I'm guessing chutney won't work either then. ;-)

https://www.epicurious.com/expert-advice/differences-jams-jellies-marmalades-chutneys-preserves-shopping-groceries-article

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