1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Chinese
  4. >
  5. "What time do you get off wor…

"What time do you get off work tomorrow?"

Translation:你明天几点下班?

November 27, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QianYanWanYu

"明天你几点下班?" is correct, please
-> reported


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TugaDances

I have also reported and someone taught me that in Chinese it is preferable to introduce time and space first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KaptianKaos8

你几点明天下班 not accepted 22 Mar 2018. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SzymonRuci

Well, the order of telling the time in Chinese goes: year-month-day and after that comes time of the day. 明天 refers to the day so the question about time (几点) must come right after it. Hence «你明天几点下班?» or «明天你几点下班?».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lcoolj92301

can someone tell me whats wrong with this translation 明天你下班什么时候 ik 什么时候can imply a different type of time but I think it's fine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

The time when something happens always comes before the verb. Knly a duration (how ling the verb action takes) can come after it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dafadllyn

Is there a reason why 你明天幾點會下班 isn't accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/casperdewith

It's xià for leaving work, but fàng for leaving school. Why so?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

You can also say xiàkè 下课 for when classes are over for the day, but also for a particular class ending. 放学 is only used in the former sense, not the latter one. It’s just fixed expressions/verb-object combinations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/casperdewith

Ah, okay; so it’s just a lot of memorisation of expressions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AbunPang

Kind of? But it’s really not that bad. It’s just another piece of vocabulary – nothing different from a normal verb. The only difference is a grammatical one: That grammatically it’s a verb + an object rather than just an intransitive verb. And you don’t get random combinations for any arbitrary expression. Generally they correspond to one of these in English:

  • an intransitive verb (e.g. shuìjiào 睡觉 “to sleep”)
  • the intransitive version of a verb which can be either transitive or intransitive in English (e.g. chī 吃 “to eat” always needs an object; if you just want to say “to eat” in general, nothing particular, then you have to use a dummy object, in this case fàn 饭, literally “cooked rice”)
  • a very common multi-word expression such as 下班 “to get off work”. Typically these aren’t random but follow patterns though. For instance 上 is often used for starting/attending some business/appointment, and if you can 上 something you can usually also 下 “get off“ it etc.
Learn Chinese in just 5 minutes a day. For free.