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  5. "对不起!没关系!"

"对不起!没关系!"

Translation:Sorry! No worries!

November 28, 2017

91 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo
  • 211

In Canada we say "No problem" instead of "no worries".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adam_gis

Really? As a Chinese native speaker see, 没关系, which is the reply to "对不起", can be translated into "It's OK" "It doesn't matter" "Never mind" "That's all right" etc.

In China, "No problem" is mostly translated into "没问题", which is used as the informal promise to the request.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeiLiEsq

My mother was Chinese, and I grew up speaking Chinese. I was about to post a comment on the lines of the one I am replying to. "That's all right," "It's OK," "It doesn't matter" should be acceptable translations for this phrase


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

"No problem" is far more common in North America, though "no worries", which is popular in Australia, is gaining ground.

The English usage doesn't exactly track the Chinese usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adam_gis

学习了,谢谢 : D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/p40sZFlP

What does that mean? Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adam_gis

"学习了" can be literally translated as "I have learned (it)." Here I used it as an informal expression of "明白了", which means "Got it".

谢谢 = Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moripolyglot

No problem is correct


[deactivated user]

    I'd say "no problem" in response to someone saying "thank you", not "sorry". I'd say "no worries" if someone said "sorry".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoranMihaj1

    Fellow Canadian here and we totally say "no worries" as well. Ive heard itbused and use it myself for over 15 years. Theyre used interchangeably and often enough.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SolbrittSc1

    Today I tried to use No problem instead of No worries and it was accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

    Agreed, should be accepted!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidCorba5

    I agree, although I said "no problems". That can be said to cover a number of situations including an informal promise to a request, as well as the equivalent to "no worries" I was marked wrong.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

    "对不起!没关系! " should be "Sorry! It doesn't matter." I am OK with "no worries" , but when would anyone say these two phrases at the same time?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

    OK, this scene fits:

    伊丽莎白在吗?
    Is Elizabeth there?
    这里没有伊丽莎白。
    There's no Elizabeth here.
    怎么可能?这是她的号码!
    How come? This is her number!
    你要找伊丽莎白, 打到白金汉宫吧!
    If you want Elizabeth, call Buckingham Palace!
    对不起,没关系!
    Sorry, it's alright.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmadeusThiemann

    Is 'sorry, it' s alright' said by one person, or who is saying what in this nice example?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    A scenario such as Keith_App's would work, but I took it as two people speaking to one another, one saying sorry, and the other, it's all right. The problem is that Duolingo doesn't use actual dialogue format (yet, anyway).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin819800

    Why is "没关系" always No worries and not It's ok?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanRasm

    Report it. I think "That's all right" is a better fit than "no worries," but it's not accepted either. "Don't worry about it" is accepted though -- maybe Tommy Wiseau wrote this lesson?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joanacxu09

    WHY IS "no problem" WRONG


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/badwolfnorth

    Because they are being literal. No problem would be "没有问题“. It's a little strange because no problem/no worries are 100% interchangeable in English but they are not interchangeable in Chinese.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MomoKawa1

    It accepts "no problem" just fine, in the current version i am on it will ONLY accept "pardon me" and not "excuse me". ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤ weird.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesLawry

    "No worries" is a distinctly Australian/New Zealand English expression. Could we have some translations of this phrase into more natural US or British English expressions as well please?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Profilesar1

    I definitely say no worries and no problem as a Canadian.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASchaufele

    Also Canadian, the more ways to say sorry the better!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cactuscoffeerose

    "No worries" is quite common in most places in the US! but curious to hear whether this is synonymous with "it's alright"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

    I'm Australian so personally I always think of this as "no worries" and in fact I hear people from many countries using it now, it seems to be going global. Nevertheless it seems bizarre that an answer using "no problem" gets marked wrong!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessePaedia

    Australians and New Zealanders have to deal with US spelling, the use of the American flag to represent English and use of distinctly American expressions. I think you're be alright, mate.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fedes16

    I understand it's not about national pride, but about not forcing just one variant arbitrarily on everyone. I'm a Spanish speaker, and I trip over this one every single time. And there's no Mandarin from Spanish course, in case you're wondering what I'm doing here. I bet there are lots of non native English speakers.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobBowles1

    All the more important to get the English right!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave168907

    I believe that just as often, we Americans "have to deal" (oh, my gosh!) With the flag of the UK to represent English and have to choke on "centre" and "labour", etc.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will672148

    I'm from the United States and we use "No worries."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rissenda

    Multiple answers should be accepted for this.

    I typed "Sorry! No problem!" and got it incorrect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aizixin

    No worries = no problem = it's OK: Why is there only one correct version of this? It's frustrating!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_.-Merritt-._

    Please, Duo fix this. Different countries have different ways of saying things. Please add MULTIPLE answers. Thank you.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marisja7

    Can someone explain the structure of these, please?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabinaKippy

    This phrase in Chinese has a lot of acceptable English translations (from the more formal to the casual) and needs to be corrected to include them. Duolingo for Chinese study seems to be challenged as to its translations being too narrow / literal. In this instance all of the following should be acceptable: Sorry! No worries!
    Excuse me! No problem/worries! Pardon me! That's OK! I'm sorry! No problem/worries! I'm sorry! That's OK! etc.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M8T

    also can be "don't worry about it"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Curt510686

    "It's fine" dosen't count....?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snipegavain

    Yes, I apologize to myself too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mishtle

    I translated it as "Sorry! Don't worry!" and didn't accept it, why is it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DidiWeidmann

    As the right answers are selected very arbitral ... --> All these missing answers should be added as soon as possible!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jollyfiesh

    And why is no problem not correct? Aren't they relatively equal when used in this context?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleister_Al

    Why does "Excuse me! It doesn't matter!" is wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dejo
    • 211

    Sorry!, Excuse me! and Pardon me! are synonymous.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DidiWeidmann

    "Sorry! Do not worry!" and "Sorry! Don't worry!" are both not accepted ... please add!!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hernanitz

    'No problem' should be taken as a valid translation for 'mei guan xi'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qzuser1

    "Never mind" also can be "没关系"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/INDIGOBLUE17

    Here's a list of phrases that mean the same as no worries "no problem" "not an issue" "It's okay" "its fine" "it's alright"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JReeve91

    I lived in China for 5 years, my wife is Chinese and says that this sentence should also accept 'No problem' as it is used interchangeably with '没问题' which also means 'No problem'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave168907

    Hey people! Don't worry about it! Just go on to the next exercise and keep learning!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mxriii

    Just thought this was an interesting point.. I study Chinese at school, and our language is Korean. We learnt that the Korean translation of 没关系 is 괜찮습니다, which translates to 'It's okay'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

    'No problem' is not accepted April 2018.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanieB87596

    The sentence itself is bad. If im saying sorry, i don't get to tell the person it's ok. This structure would only be appropriate if it's a question. Sorry, is it ok?, or sorry, no hard feelings?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmithUA01

    please clarify whether "no problem!" is, or is not, acceptable for "dui bu qi". at the moment the course is inconsistent.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

    对不起 means sorry (what you say as an apology). 没关系 is dismissing someone's worry about a matter: it's not important/it doesn't matter/that's ok/don't worry about it/etc. You can say 没关系 after someone appologizes to you. Note: 关系 does not mean "problem." 关系 means something like "how much something matters". When you have a good relationship with someone, like having good connections, that is having good 关系 with that person.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    And to clarify, among those translation options that you've given, "no problem" fits just fine, even though "关系" doesn't mean "problem".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nook178664

    It can also be "No problem"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobBowles1

    DuoLingo: Please fix the English in this Chinese course!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luminousrose15

    No problem should be the answer. I've been learning Chinese since I was 8 years old and they taught us "No problem"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raphael516450

    没关系means it doesn't matter also. Well duolingo doesn't work with memrise


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucapaez

    ¿Sorry? ¿No worries? ¿?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidVerno5

    I am happy that my answer " excuse me, it's no trouble". is entirely satisfactory.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kai475121

    In school we leared it was im sorry, its ok


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeunObises1

    I am sorry ,no problem I am sorry.nk worries


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeverlyMay3

    In the question before the last it marked me wrong before i had time to finish it.i got as far as good and it didn't allow me ti put i. Bye. This has happened before and i know my answer was correct. It was thank you goodbye


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AuxYo

    I can't say not a worrie?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    You could say "not a worry" (notice the spelling), but it's not a common phrase in this context, at least in North America.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AuxYo

    Ok thank you


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FJSoekahar

    Most of the exercises translate sorry to:" 对不起. However all of sudden comes out:" 抱歉. What their difference and how/when should we use each of them?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    One distinction seems to be that "对不起" is used only for owning up to a mistake of the speaker's, whereas "抱歉" can be used for expressing regret about a situation that the speaker didn't cause (though it's not limited to such situations). Another is that "抱歉" is a bit more formal, in a sense, and less emotional, and therefore it carries less weight, sort of like "apologies".

    I welcome corrections as usual.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FJSoekahar

    谢谢 PeaceJoyPancakes


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamOoi85

    I am sorry, no worries, I will pay for it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe677676

    Always get this wrong first time around because the guy speaker has an abnormally long pause between duibuchi and meiguanxi !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gelukservaring

    'No worries' sounds highly colloquial to me, I would prefer 'No problem' – which is already somewhat informal. Or, in more formal situations, 'It doesn't matter.'


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SubhamPan

    The meinguan xi part comes after such a long pause!! Made me make a mistake multiple times, pls fix this!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryLBulthouse

    对不起 does this actually mean: Correct false start = sorry?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    No, it means "face not up", i.e. "(I) cannot face (you)", i.e. "I'm not worthy of facing you".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryLBulthouse

    please explain. are you a natural speaker?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

    I'm not a native Chinese speaker, if that's what you mean.

    You can read about positive and negative potential complements using "-得起" and "-不起" here:

    (The sense is often about being able to afford something or not, but as with other similar potential complements, fundamentally it's about whether or not the action in question can be achieved.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryLBulthouse

    Thank you for pointing me to this resource!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theguywith8

    I was marked wrong for using periods instead of exclamation points.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NotFound63

    can't you say: excuse me! no problem! ??


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wQSoxFsc

    This is the most tedious and repetitive lesson up until this point.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreas220102

    "Excuse me" was marked wrong, and "Pardon me" was given as the correct answer. I think both should be accepted.

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