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"Hij denkt aan de vis."

Translation:He thinks about the fish.

0
8 months ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nair.Varun

Is ''Hij denkt over de vis" also correct ?

2
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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No, that does not work. It's either:

  • Hij denkt aan de vis
  • Hij denkt na over de vis
  • Hij denkt over de vis na

If you want to use "over" in this sentence, you need to use the verb 'nadenken' instead of 'denken'.

9
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carlos_0701

which one is more commonly used?

"denken aan" or "nadenken over"

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Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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They have slightly different meanings, so

  • denken aan = to think about
  • nadenken over = to think about, as in: to consider, to reflect on, to ponder, to contemplate
1
Reply23 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rcambrj

Would this work in a scenario such as at a restaurant, when I'm considering ordering the fish?

  • what are you going to order?
  • I'm thinking about the fish
1
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/allenfrang

Also works for when you break up with the fish but you still won't move on

4
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donegal.ruth

Why isn't he thinks on the fish acceptable? The hint says aan is on or about.

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Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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"Think on" is not unknown in English (UK) but is less common than "think about". I have heard "I'll think on it and let you know", meaning, "I'll consider it, reflect on it". The structure is idiomatic and colloquial. You might hear it as an imperative: "Think on!" meaning, "Yeah, right" or "You must be kidding/joking". Shakespeare uses "think on't" (think on it, consider it). "Let me not think on't. Frailty, thy name is woman" (Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 2) when Hamlet criticises his mother's hasty remarriage.

1
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Limeila
Limeila
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Because it doesn't make sense in English.

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Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crevulus
crevulus
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Can someone summarise the difference between "over" and "aan"

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Reply3 months ago