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  5. "李医生在医院。"

"李医生在医院。"

Translation:Doctor Li is at the hospital.

December 2, 2017

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin819800

李 can also be "Lee" right? It's my last name and it says it is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhouhuanyue

Li is Li and Lee is Li


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n3uromante

I kept trying to input "Lee" and it wouldmark my answer as wrong because of it. "Lee" is acceptable in many of the other lower level exercises, it should be fixed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

Yes and it has been reported that they now accept it. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowanCWill

As Aliona said 'in hospital' should be correct as well as 'in the hospital'. Its British English, and is what they teach in at least some of Europe meaning it is natural to a lot of people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ONLYAARON

America rules I guess...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ADussi

wouldn't "in hospital" (and even "in the hospital" usually) imply that the person is there as a patient, and not just simply present there? whereas I'm assuming they mean the doctor is there working, not as a patient. in the US at least, saying someone's in the hospital generally implies they're there as a patient, whereas an employee, visitor, etc. is "at the hospital." I think that's why there's some confusion here. this isn't a hard rule of course but typically how those phrases are used contextually


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgePerr1

Doctor Li's in the hospital, marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

Not wrong, report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ONLYAARON

Yes, Li's looks wrong. When affixed to a proper noun it indicates possession 的


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASZ18101849

In that sentence "Li's" doesn't indicate possession. It's a contraction of "Li is".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JiunnChyi

Doctor Li's and Doctor Li is isnt the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OrcMando

The meaning is, and that's the point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/poxCtK

My issue is it wont take Dr. Li .... have to spell out doctor


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/unfetteredferret

does hanyu distinguish between "in the hospital" and "at the hospital?" xie xie


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillMackay123

isn't '生在' born in and ’正在‘ at hospital?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhouhuanyue

正在 means "currently doing", like "我正在寫" (I am currently writing), you use 著 if you're doing something that is continuous, "我愛著你" (I am (continuously) loving you) if you want to say "I am currently at the hospital" you would have to put another 在 to show that you're there, ("我正在在醫院" (I am at/in the hospital right now)) otherwise if you say "I am hospital right now"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matheus666393

I guess you made a mistake separating the words here. 在 is used by itself to indicate location, or in this case "at". 生 is part of 医生 (doctor), not 生在 as you thought it was. Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qTqw8

The only translation of '住在' in my dictionary is 'live in' - is this colloquial use?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Take a close look at the characters. 正在 + verb indicates the current, continuous action of the verb. 住在 + place means to live in that place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhouhuanyue

Your dictionary is completely right, it’s used in Taiwan, China and Malasia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

*Malaysia, and Singapore as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karoliina765050

Please add 'Lee' as an acceptable option to 'Li'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhouhuanyue

It’s Li, not Lee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

It can be both, Li for countries where they only accept the hanyupinyin version and Lee for places like, say, Malaysia and Singapore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

And the Chinese diaspora in especially English-speaking countries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cat424683

could it be in the hospital, like in the restaurant...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexanderUrso

I've heard somewhere that hospital is 家医院 , is it really?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

家 is a counter for some kinds of buildings like 个 is a counter for many things, it's not part of the word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leung1245

Are you serious? It could be spelled Li or Lee!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zhouhuanyue

李 (ㄌㄧˇ/Lǐ)is Li, not Lee!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Lee is not pinyin, that's why.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

Yes, but Duolingo doesn't accept it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Duolingo accepts it in every other question in the course I've encountered in the past several months.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

That was some time ago, good that they have corrected it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ASZ18101849

"Doctor Li is at the hospital" is the default translation is here, but I used "at" for another question and it was rejected. Come on, Duolingo, at least be consistent and accept "at" for all of those similar questions...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GarotaDeIp

I just put li in front of doctor it should have been fine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aliona718665

Funny)))who decided that it should be THE hospital in English, but not simply hospital


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grey236

'the' is needed here. It isn't a grammatically correct sentence without it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowanCWill

Not if you use British English, and maybe the Englishes of the southern hemisphere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SabianF

Common ≠ grammatical


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grippygecko

Perhaps not. However "in hospital " is grammatically correct in British English. But there is an important difference between being "at the hospital " and "in hospital ". The former would apply to a person working in or visiting the hospital. The latter would refer to an in patient.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

I'm Australian and neither "at hospital" nor "in hospital"sounds quite right to me. Then again maybe the one with "in" is OK, sometimes it's hard to analyse your own language instinct...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas292098

The same people who decided to use simplified Chinese characters in this app...the majority! :P (In this case American English)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NenaVaskin

"At hospital" is more correct than "at the hospital" I'm from the UK


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

In American English, "at the hospital" means that a person is physically in the hospital building (working, visiting someone, etc). We do not use that to describe patients.
"In the hospital" means that the person has been admitted to the hospital as a patient.

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