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  5. "你不喝茶。"

"你不喝茶。"

Translation:You do not drink tea.

December 3, 2017

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClayMage

Should "You are not drinking tea" be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RedPanda579

Yeah. I put you dont drink tea and it was wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Justin384919

Same question. How should we distinguish between the perpetual state of tea-eschewing vs. the present tense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jim140738

that would be 你不在喝茶


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jane541174

Don't and do not have the same meaning. My answer should be considered correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trixiadatter

One does not simply drink tea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabfifties

Chinese : 茶 ( chá ) Romanian : Ceai ( pronounced like chai ) Russian : Чай ( chai )

None of them are related, so who borrowed from whom?, or is it all coincidence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/issam28

In arabic too : شاي (shai)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luo_bingbing

Same in Persian lol چای (chai) and Japanese.. お茶 (ocha) you can also remove O.. so it'll be the same as chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/levanchobo

Georgian ჩაი (chai)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P-Code

Romanian borrowed "ceai" from Russian, and Russian's "чай" is from Turkic. Mandarin's 茶 just seems to be a coincidence, and Arabic's "شاي" is directly from Mandarin.

Source: Wiktionary

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D1%87%D0%B0%D0%B9#Russian

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E8%8C%B6#Chinese

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ceai#Romanian

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%D8%B4%D8%A7%D9%8A


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melina.Arins

In short: the word for "tea" in most languages comes from the readings of two different dialects for the Chinese word .
That is what caused two distinct paths as those of English tea and Portuguese chá, for instance (one form spread through Dutch traders and the other through Portuguese traders).

Wikipedia (in its article "Tea") explains it as follows:

Most Chinese languages, such as Mandarin and Cantonese, pronounce it along the lines of cha, but Hokkien and Teochew Chinese varieties along the Southern coast of China pronounce it like teh. These two pronunciations have made their separate ways into other languages around the world.

Starting in the early 17th century, the Dutch played a dominant role in the early European tea trade via the Dutch East India Company. The Dutch borrowed the word for "tea" (thee) from Min Chinese, either through trade directly from Hokkien speakers in Formosa where they had established a port, or from Malay traders in Bantam, Java. The Dutch then introduced to other European languages this Min pronunciation for tea, including English tea, French thé, Spanish , and German Tee. This pronunciation is also the most common form worldwide. The Cha pronunciation came from the Cantonese chàh of Guangzhou (Canton) and the ports of Hong Kong and Macau, which were also major points of contact, especially with the Portuguese traders who settled Macau in the 16th century. The Portuguese adopted the Cantonese pronunciation "chá", and spread it to India. However, the Korean and Japanese pronunciations of cha were not from Cantonese, but were borrowed into Korean and Japanese during earlier periods of Chinese history.

A third form, the increasingly widespread chai, came from Persian چای [t͡ʃɒːi] chay. Both the châ and chây forms are found in Persian dictionaries. They are derived from the Northern Chinese pronunciation of chá, which passed overland to Central Asia and Persia, where it picked up the Persian grammatical suffix -yi before passing on to Russian as чай ([tɕæj], chay), Arabic as شاي (pronounced shay [ʃæiː] due to the lack of a /t͡ʃ/ sound in Arabic), Urdu as چائے chay, Hindi as चाय chāy, Turkish as çay, etc.

Have a better look at the etymology there:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etymology_of_tea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rose.boi

Portuguese as well; chá


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChiaStockwell

What non tea drinking heathen is this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/steve145637

Don't is same as do not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bella138753

Don't is the contraction of do not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/werothegreat

What's wrong with "you're not drinking tea"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScorchYRR

From another answer, a "zai" we haven't been taught yet means "are". So the sentence for that would be something like wo zai bu he cha, or something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tai246502

One implies the lack of desire and the other to stating a fact that person doesn't drink tea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RKAjo7

I am not understanding. How to pronounce "he"(drink)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HannahBanana427

You don't drink tea?! That's like not breathing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeahSpry

Should accept "You don't drink tea"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne15300

"You don't drink tea" Should have been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clara604861

"You don't drink tea" is just as correct as "You do not drink tea" and should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sergio_Vieira

"You don't drink water" can be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SongHookCo

Dont and do not are the same...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kuei-Ti

Shouldn't it be "don't" instead of "dont"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slacktak

I put you don't drink tea, do and do not are both the same thing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SajanaRai

In Nepal, we call tea "chiya".

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