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"Eine weiße Katze und eine weiße Blume."

Translation:A white cat and a white flower.

December 3, 2017

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Morayson

Why not "One white cat and one white flower"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That's also a valid translation. Report it as a missing alternative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InvertedGo

True. In real life you'd be able to tell the difference from which words are stressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopSixSquish

So if this was 'the white cat and the white flower' would it be 'die weiß Katze und die weiß Blune'? I'm trying to understand this inflection thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No - that would be die weiße Katze und die weiße Blume.

Weak inflection (after the definite article) still has an ending, which is -e for nominative singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkashAkay

Eine weiße katze und weiße blume


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 352

That doesn't work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deutschisfun17

How do you know if it is weiße or weißer? Does this have something to do with the gender of the noun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

How do you know if it is weiße or weißer? Does this have something to do with the gender of the noun?

Yes, and with whether there is ein/eine/einer/einem/einen or der/die/das/des/dem/den in front of it.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_adjectives#Weak,_mixed,_and_strong_inflection .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacquelineB77

why can you not accept ss,as in weisse ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

why can you not accept ss,as in weisse ?

That should be accepted.

What was your entire sentence? Do you have a screenshot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plazmair

Since blum is single and blume is plural, why is there a "eine "placed there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Since blum is single and blume is plural

I don't know which language that might be true in, but in (standard) German, the singular for "flower" is Blume (capital B at the beginning, -e at the end) and its plural is Blumen (capital B, -en).

Checking Wikipedia, it says that in Hunsrick and in Pennsylvania Dutch, we have Blumm, pl. Blumme, and in Afrikaans, it's blom, pl. blomme; are you perhaps influenced by some other Germanic language than Standard German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 352

That would be "eine weise Katze" (one single "s", pronounced like the "s" in "rose"). With an "ß" (or its substitute "ss") (pronounced like the "c" in "ice") it is "a white cat".

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