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  5. "我生病了,不能参加你的派对。"

"我生病了,不能参加你的派对。"

Translation:I am sick, I can't attend your party.

December 5, 2017

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrandonHu3

"I am sick. I can't go to your party." should be accepted too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveLommen

"Can jia" is really "to join", not "to go".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZingGot

It doesn't matter; in English unless you're playing D+D you don't "join" a party. So in that context it very definitely means "come to"/"go to" which are interchangeable in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.BG35oX

you can 'join' a party....an event


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@ZingGot - you can't attend a party? Really? Who stops you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Handrisuselo

参加 (can jia) means "to attend".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zest16

These sentences united by a comma are a nightmare. Sometimes the translation is a dot, sometimes "and". Why not accept both?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZingGot

So would also often be accurate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doug264842

Using a comma without a conjunction is wrong in English; it has to be a semicolon or two separate sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Just suggest any correct missing answer then they will accept both. This is what this beta course if for after all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryRynsbu

We don't say "attend" a party. A much more natural translation is "I can't come to your party."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@Mary - You don't say 'attend a party'. Someone else might object to 'come to a party'. Can we please focus on learning Chinese here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dagummace

I am sick and can't attend your party


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Changing4

I am sick. I am unable to go to your party."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sylphanni.nara

using participate should also be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewLowe0

'Sick' and 'ill' should both be accepted. Only the millionth time I have had to report this, as DL only corrects individual sentences without making identical corrections elsewhere on their sentence database.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RajasDaithankar

@Andrew - in your own English database, how have you marked the word "like"? e.g. if I say "I like you", what does your database understand? And if I say "I am like you", what does it understand? Finally, "I like people like you" and "I like people who like you". If you made correction on your database then I'm sure you'd have translated most of these sentences wrongly. Above was just one me. Now multiply it by twenty million (others' variations / suggestions / outraged complaints). That's the problem Duo Lingo has to deal with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

I just suggested they also accept "I'm sick and can't attend your party".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SlayPayBae

我想要一个妹子可以"参加"我的派对


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sossidge.Mahoney

Why is it can in the sentence, but shen in individially??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leyitastic

参 can be pronounced in two ways "shēn" or "cān", it depends on the context how you pronounce it. In 参加/joining in, it's "cānjiā" and for ginseng it's "shēn". So Duolingo should not use the latter pinyin audio at all for this lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babybish

How would you say, "I was sick"? I was thinking this sentence was in the past tense because of the "le" but I realize it can also be used to describe a condition that is temporary, ie: i won't always be sick, but I am sick now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strigifer

The 了 here signifies a change of state. The implication is that I was not sick when you invited me, but I've gotten sick in the meantime.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jakemmman

参加 is most commonly associated with "joining" or "attending" , and in this case those two are 100% okay. A more casual phrase in Chinese could warrant a more casual translation like "come to" or "go to" your party.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkBird5

I am sick and can't attend your party. should also be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophieKraj

Isn't 我生病了more like "I (just) got sick"? I feel like that would be a good way to translate the 了 in this case


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferMe374359

"I am sick and can't attend your party." should be considered correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronChai4

聚会 means party as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doug264842

The English translation should have a semicolon; a comma isn't correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann55075

If 参加 can't be translated as "take part in" here, then may be it would be better to remove this translation from the hints?

Or else accept "take part in" in spite of this being a bad grammar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.BG35oX

'le'...means past tense....I was sick??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Chinese doesn't really have past tense the same way English does. It means something about the past or a change. The best way to think about it in cases like this one is that it could literally translate to "I got sick" or "I became sick". I wasn't sick before but now I am. I've seen other languages that would translate it in a similar way to how Chinese does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jim750574

"I am sick, I can't attend to your party" marked as wrong?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strigifer

"attend to" does not have the same meaning as "attend".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim540505

i am sick, i can't join your party this should be accepted too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DannyPerks

Im ill I cannot join your party not accepted :/

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