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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan_M1

The dizzying heights of the mighty level 25 (German)

Hey !

I aspire to be at the dizzying heights of the mighty level 25 (30'000 xp). How I look up to those who have attained this duolingo status of wisdom.

First stop - full tree; Next stop - gold tree; One day - level 25 :)

Currently - 17'371xp + bottom section of the tree.

Who wants to join me in the level 25 quest ?

Good luck to you all

December 8, 2017

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luscinda

I really wouldn't bother. Since the removal of immersion, the only way to get that number of points is to keep repeating the tree ad nauseam, and it isn't worth your time - duo trees really aren't good enough to justify you spending your time on them rather than a communicative course with, you know, actual conversations, proper grammar explanations, natural language etc. etc. etc. :YulBrinner: There comes a point when you have to choose between duo points and something that will improve your German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan_M1

Hey Luscinda! Thanks for your comment. Absolutely agree, duolingo cannot and should not be the only teaching aid. From my point of view its a fun way to practise every day and to achieve very small goals on a regular basis, which as we all know, is absolutely crucial to keep going when trying to improve a language.

I notice you also say that while being an expert on Duolingo and level 25 in 3 languages !! That is amazing ! Hence, despite what you say, I truly hope to be at your level in German and French in the not so distant future :) :) :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elisabeth3789

Hi Luscinda, I don't think it's an either/or issue. I find Duo really helpful, but I also supplement it with other materials, for example my Kanji book for Japanese (A guide to reading and writing Japanese by Sakade/Tuttle), and some easy fiction readers for Spanish and French. I have some of the German versions of these too, which I used to use when I was teaching German. I'll also pick up a Spanish newspaper every now and then...

Once I can zip through the Japanese tree without any hold-ups, I'll find myself some additional resources...

And I also try some of the suggested online resources around here, one or two at a time. I went all crazy with getting additional books with Spanish, and now I realize that I'm not using them. So in the future, I'll go a bit more slowly...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margaret287230

Keep up the good work and don't give up! I found as I advanced beyond the early stages each section was much more difficult that the previous and I had to revise a lot more to remember the vocabulary. I am in no hurry to finish the tree and I do the minimum lessons every day when I am very busy and more when I have extra time. I do read the discussions for tips and look at other sights. and look forward to the day when I can go to Germany. Best wishes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan_M1

Hey Margaret! Completely agree also. I am in no rush either. I am taking my time with the tree, its been a couple of years since I started on duolingo. I want to understand what I am doing as I progress. That said, I do now target to finish the tree by the end of the year, as I am touching distance away now. Then I will revise and revise until I know everything extremely well. My other methods are Anki, skype lessons and soon to start a language exchange once per week. Good luck to you !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannibal-Barkas

good luck to you, too. Maybe I will reach that point one da, but I try a different approach: laddering. That's when you try to reach your goal through many languages. I mainly try to learn French, so I did F from GER (my native language). Then I did the reverse tree. Since I am not bad in English I did the same with English to French and vice versa. English to German and back has been finished as well, so I invited Spanish to the club. I am in the lower third of the tree from German to Spanish before I try the reverse course. After that I go through the other combinations. The finished trees I will repeat once in a while to brush up my knowledge, thus crawling slowly to level 25.

Enough of my boasting. What about you trying to write in German instead of English? Even if you're not perfect, you can learn a lot from your mistakes - provided someone is going to correct them. Have fun and good luck with your efforts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan_M1

And by the way, please boast away (keep boasting) ! Its exactly such comments and people like you who motivate me to do more and keep going. All the best


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan_M1

Hey! thanks for your reply. Happy to hear about your strategy. I sincerely consider that regularly. I love French and I hear it every day at home, so I would love to work on it in tandem. However, I feel that my time is limited to study and practise German already, plus out of any personal objectives I have, German is by far number 1 and would be the most helpful to me to achieve. Therefore, for the moment, I am (trying to be) single minded in my pursuit of this goal. I do not know any other languages to such a high level, so I will be over the moon to improve my German - hopefully to level B1 - while getting to level 25 :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slatour

I never did immersion but just kept plugging away at lessons and I think it was helpful to me. I am really only focused on French and now I mostly use Memrise for that. Keep up your quest! It is a worthwhile goal and if you are still enjoying it there is no reason to stop!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LateBlt

Honestly, I have to agree with what Luscinda said... I've been level 25 in German for a while, but only because I did a lot of immersion, back when that feature still existed here. Back then you could get hundreds of XP in a matter of minutes if you were good at translating, and the act of translating was very interesting and often much more helpful at bringing people into a deeper level of language usage than what you get with Duolingo's actual lessons. Most people are at something like level 12 by the time they finish Duolingo's tree, and while it might be worthwhile to repeat the tree (or at least the most difficult sections of the tree), you'll probably have outgrown Duolingo's lessons long before you actually reach level 25. I'm still here just for giggles, because I already got my B2-level German certificate 3 years ago, which is a higher level than one will ever reach with Duolingo alone. I like the community here and the feel of the place which is why I still check the comments sometimes, but mostly I'm just here to see how long I can keep my streak going for. You being already level 21, I think you can probably forget about bringing your actual German ability farther using Duolingo. Not that it isn't fun to play it like an RPG and slowly grind up your stats; you can do that if you like, but if you really want to increase your actual language acuity, you need to be doing something else at this point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karthik.subr

I might have to disagree with "Most people are at something like level 12 by the time they finish Duolingo's tree"

I am at Level 17 and I have completed 70 of the 121 lessons. So it's a long way to go and I should be close to 25 when I manage to finish the tree. It is probably possible to complete the tree at Level 12, but that is when you only keep doing new lessons and do not strengthen.

As a strategy, I mainly focus on repetition of difficult lessons and an extremely generous usage of 'strengthen skills'. This way, my skills have always been gold and the words stick in my memory longer.

So far so good!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominiqueDEcosse

I‘m in! I use Duolingo as a convenient way to refresh German, wherever I am. Last year I completed the English - German tree and then I lost interest. Two weeks ago I came back and got my tree all nice and golden again. To avoid boredom, I have just taken up one of the suggestions I read here to start the reverse tree. I find it strangely fascinating and addictive. As for other sources of language learning, I love reading novels. I have quite a few German thrillers on Kindle, which I can recommend as Kindle has a built-in dictionary. I also enjoy audiobooks; a good exercise is to listen to the audiobook while reading the e-book. Of course Duolingo has its limits but it is a good way to practice vocabulary and simple grammar. I find it very helpful that Duo points me to my weaker areas, by showing where I need to review. That works for me. I can’t praise the creators and staff of Duo enough for providing this wonderful resource free of charge to the end-user :)


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