https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Help with English Proverbs, Please

Hello,

I'm working on a Tinycard deck proverbs/phrases German-English. In German I'm quite sure how to use them and what they mean it's my mother tongue but in English I'm pretty uncertain.

It would be really great if some of you could have a look and tell me if the proverbs are correct and if they are really in use and not unusual.

https://tiny.cards/decks/8486971c-c572-4278-a9f9-b2d90de4e8a1

Thank you very much for your help

Best regards Angel

December 10, 2017

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/despina11111

Hi Angel, I think I can help with some of the proverbs! I like them a lot! In English I think they are used a lot, just with different words. Same meaning of the proverb, but different words! Some of them have the same words actually.

Ohne Fleiß, kein preiß! No pain, no gain!

Jeder ist seines Glückes Schmied! Life is what you make it!

Lügen haben, kurze Beine! Lies have short legs! (I think, this is actually original german proverb. )

Ein Spatz in der Hand ist besser als eine Taube auf dem Dach! A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush!

Hals und Beinbruch! Break a leg!

Taten sagen mehr als worte! Actions speak louder than words!

Honestly I don't understand the others, I can translate the words but I don't know what they mean. If you can write the meaning of them I could think of the english version. And I also must write my favourite proverb for German learning motivation...

Übung macht den Meister! Practise makes perfect!

Bis bald!

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Despina,

Proverbs are very common in German, too. So the phrases you wrote are correct?

So let's make some fun let's translate the others literally (Germans love that game!).

Müßiggang ist aller Laster Anfang - Faineance is the beginning of all vice

Du sollst den Tag nicht vor dem Abend loben - You shall not praise the day before the evening

Hals- und Beinbruch - Break a neck and a leg

Best regards Angel

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/idkhbtfm

I think the second one is more commonly said as "don't count your eggs before they hatch', and the third is "break a leg" (good luck)

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi,

Thank you for your answer. The proverbs in my answer to despina are literally translated not the phrases I've chosen for the Tinycards. ^^

I found both "don't count your eggs/chickens before they hatch' and I decided for the chickens but when you say 'eggs' are more common I'll consider it. Hals- und Beinbruch is also in German a proverb used to wish luck as 'break a leg' in English.

Best regards Angel

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda

It's don't count your chickens before they hatch. You can count eggs while they are eggs - you can't count the number of chicks that will come out of them until they are hatched.

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Luscinda,

Sounds logical, thank you for your answer.

Best regards Angel

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/artluvva

I think that Müßiggang ist aller Laster Anfang could be Money is the root of all evil. We also say Love of money is the root of all evil.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hello Barbara,

thanks for your answer. I found that translation, too but in German we also say 'Habgier/Geld/Zaster ist die Wurzel allen Übels' and in my opinion these two proverbs match more. But thank you for that, I didn't had this on my list. :-)

Best regards Angel

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/despina11111

You Germans break the leg AND THE NECK, too! hahaha LOL This was the first time I saw this proverb and I laughed a lot with the literal translation!

I'm not an English though, I'm Macedonian! The phrases I wrote are correct for sure, because I had a lesson for them in my English class.

We use this one very often in Macedonia, Lügen haben, kurze Beine! I will write it on Macedonian, too!

,, На лагата и се кратки нозете.''

Viele Grüße!

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mhre1
  • 1438

Hallo RedAngel, https://dict.leo.org/englisch-deutsch/ müßiggang, dort findest du unter Phrasen die Übersetzung für das Sprichwort. Herzliche Grüße Möhre

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hallo Möhre,

die Übersetzung habe ich, danke Dir. Ich hatte die Redewendungen nur für Despina wortwörtlich übersetzt (siehe Tinycard link). Hätte ich vielleicht nicht machen sollen, mia culpa.

liebe Grüße Angel

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hannibal-Barkas

Nette Sammlung, schönes Design, aber machst du es uns nicht zu leicht, wenn du wi beim Memory auf beiden Karten die gleichen Bilder verwendest?

Idleness is the root of all evil - Müssiggang ist aller Laster anfang.

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda

In English, Cupidity/the love of money is the root of all evil but the devil makes work for idle hands.

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Luscinda,

Thank you for that. I found different translations and made a (obviosly wrong) choice 'An idle brain is the devil's workshop'. That's why I love this forum :-)))

one of my recourses https://www.dict.cc/?s=M%C3%BC%C3%9Figgang+ist+aller+laster+anfang

So you would say I should change it into 'The devil finds work for idle hands.' ?

Best regards Angel

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda

I don't know - it could be a localised Americanism, especially if it's a direct translation of the German. It's not something I've ever come across - but then I've never heard of your apes. I would imagine that one was retired a very long time ago, if it was ever in wide use. Then again, I heard someone on the telly the other day claiming that a huge proportion of under 30s say they've never heard of 'taking/carrying coals to Newcastle', which horrifies me.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mithlas1

I hear it as "Idle hands are the devil's tools" in England and New England, it is probable that the phrase is also used in other places of UK and America. Sometimes it is said "Idle hands are the devil's playthings" to sound more poetic.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hello Mithlas,

I found this proverb, too among others.

The Devil makes work for idle hands (like Luscinda wrote)

Idle hands are the devil's tools (Your suggestion)

Idle hands/An idle brain are the devil's workshop.

Idle hands are the devil's playthings

It is really not easy at all!

Best regards Angel

Ps. Am I right in thinking that you are new here in the forum?

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Mithlas1

The term is a paraphrasing of 1 Timothy 6:10 "The love of money is a root of all kinds of evil." (Bible, New International Version). A few biblical scholars have told me a possible 'looser' translation of the Greek is "Love of money is a root of evil" because the original language does not specifically exclude other sources of vice.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hello Mithlas,

Thank you very much for your post. That is the problem with old proverbs and sayings. They were translated and changed so many times.

I have to admit I'm not familiar with the bible. So thank you for your explanation.

Best regards Angel

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Hannibal,

guter Einwand :-) Noch kann ich das Design schnell anpassen. Was wäre denn Dein Vorschlag? Nur andere Bildchen oder die Karten vogelwild im Design durcheinander würfeln? Oder hast du noch eine andere Idee?

liebe Grüße Angel

December 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Luscinda,

Sometimes it's a tricky thing to find a good equivalent. I was puzzled to find 'Idleness is the beginning of all vice.' but I'm not sure if it is a correct sentence or only literally translated. I would prefer a proverb that's common in English. I hope other members will tell us their opinion.

You still can hear the 'ape' proverb in German but most of the time in a short form. 'Ein Aff bleibt halt ein Aff' and people know what you want to say.

Some proverbs or idioms are fading others are evolving. 'taking/carrying coals to Newcastle' is already on my list ;-) The Germans say 'Eulen nach Athen tragen'.

Maybe projects like this are a good thing to keep old sayings in mind. I learn a lot in both languages.

Thank you very much for your help and your time

Best regards Angel

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda

I would say the Devil makes work for idle hands. A lot of them will be similar between languages because they come from the Bible (a leopard doesn't change it's spots, casting pearls before swine) or from Latin. In fact, I wonder if owls to Athens is classical? I'm sure I've heard that lately in a completely different context, probably a documentary about Greece.

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RedAngel666

Hi Luscinda,

Ok, I think I will change it later when I make new cards. Thank you for your help.

Yes, I think 'Eulen nach Athen tragen' is classical. a leopard doesn't change it's spots is from the bible? Interesting, I didn't know that. It's on my schedule for today :-)) funny.

Best regards Angel

edit: found it. https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/226350.html

December 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Harshavardhana

join my club i can help

December 11, 2017
Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.