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  5. "你喜欢上网做什么?"

"你喜欢上网做什么?"

Translation:What do you like to do online?

December 11, 2017

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuigiLinguine

That's between me and MI5, Duo!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dtUyaD
  • 1020

And Facebook and Google and Apple ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ktdilsiz

"What would you like to do online?" How can we distinguish between do and would? I'm not sure if I should report this kind of an answer. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lomochibi

喜欢 ia used mostly to express what you enjoy doing in general (not necessarily at the given moment tho), 想 in this context describes what you want to do now (or in the situation being discussed). Examples: 我喜欢喝茶。I like tea. / 我想喝茶。I want to drink tea.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bill496592

Sorry for asking similar question, then how about 要 (want)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glacials

要 yào is a much stronger version of 想 xiǎng, which is more wispy. Similar to the difference between "I'd like to" and "I want to". 要 can also mean "I'm going to" based on context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

People with the most important questions are always "sorry" about them

Why ?!

Don't be ! Be confident you're not asking silly questions or pedantic ones or even nagging


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

IMHO Duo has done it correctly.
In my understanding,
"What would you like to do online?"
= "What do you want to do online?"
= 你想上网做什么?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yoruji

喜欢 means "to like something" as in to find something enjoyable. "would like to" is a polite way of saying "want to", which can be translated as e.g. 想 as usual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jiglico

I guess your variant would rather translate by "xiang3" instead of "xihuan"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmitChopra9

Are "zuo" and "gan" interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BZH1423

I think so, but gan is a lot more colloquial. Probably. Someone feel free to correct me if I'm wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarriottPlayer

My Chinese dictionary says "online" is "网上", not "上网". Why would that be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaneOfRome

Your dictionary is correct: '网上' translates to 'online' and is used as an adjective or even as a location, such as in the phrase '在网上' (online, on the Internet). In contrast, '上网' is a verb meaning 'to go online.'

Compare these two sentences to see the difference:

你在网上喜欢做什么? (What do you like to do online?)

你喜欢上网做什么? (What do you like to go online to do?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Skaterbane

Learn chinese, of course!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AkJyD8

Nǐ xǐhuān shàngwǎng zuò shénme


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ant.H

Ask Trekkie Monster...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

me too, take my lingots 我的朋友


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Lin

你喜歡上網做什麼?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_LolZ_

我喜欢玩上网游戏!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elijah.Fung

What would you like to do on the internet. Why isn't it correct ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusG1

The meaning is different, as has been explained above. Would like =/= like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Burento

Is it correct to say that 上网 comes after 喜欢 because the entire action is "doing what online"? Or, 你上网喜欢做什么 would mean the actual "liking" is taking place on the internet?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnQuanDeXiWang

I thought this order would be morr correct since chinese grammar follows the structure who (subject), when, where, how, and and action with any objects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pacificogo3

I am still not sure


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FJSoekahar

喜欢 sounds like very much like xiHUAT to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MechamRachel

I like to hear the words in Chinese , but frequently there is no sound at all which is very frustrating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MalBrood

check your browser settings, you may be blocking audio


[deactivated user]

    I feel like "What do you guys like to do on the internet" should also be accepted...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WIMDispa

    Why is my answer marked as wrong?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clara604861

    You can't ask that!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XinqiaoZha1

    You would normally say 干 instead of 做


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KanKanMikan

    anime, anime, anime


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/i_wildebeest

    Could someone tell me the difference between 做 and 干? My understanding is that they both mean 'to do' but surely there is some contextual difference


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaweiLi5

    Just a side question, why 做 is pronounced as "duo" instead of "zuo" in most Duolingo's cases? Thanks a lot!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

    I am hearing it as "zuò," which is correct. (9.21.18)

    However, what may be confusing you is that the sound represented by "z" in pinyin us not the same as "z" in English. The "z" in pinyin sounds like what an English speaker might write as "dz". (Apollogies, I am not familiar with IPA, perhaps someone else can tell us what the IPA notations for these two sounds are.) I think you might just be hearing more of the "d" in the "dz" sound on this particular example.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jol211649

    I translated "what do you like to do on internet" and my answer was considered wrong ! incredible. Can you accept my answer ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusG1

    The definite article is required with 'internet'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesWal647678

    Uhhh. . . Just go on youtube and stuff looks around nervously


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkrizan46

    watch adult films alone


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/badwolfnorth

    "What do you like to do on the web?"

    Is more natural and should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/orgat

    "What do you like to do online" is perfectly fine.

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