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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stefandejager

Tio vs ĉi tio?

When would I use either in a sentence?

December 12, 2017

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

The particle "ĉi" suggests closeness. When used with a word like "tio", it gives a similar contrast to the difference between "this" and "that." When there is no contrast, you don't really need to use it. There is no difference in simple contexts between "that is a pen" and "this is a pen"... so in that case, you don't need the "ĉi".

Within the course, a good rule of thumb is to always use "ĉi tio" for "this" (if there's no noun) and "tio" for that - but as I said above, in real life, the distinction isn't as hard and fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenryLeonardi

tio= that (without noun ĉi tio= this (without noun

tio bonas= that is good ĉi tio bonas= this is good


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

I've voted this answer down for two reasons. First, you didn't really answer the question. To say that "tio" is "that" and "ĉi tio" is this only begs the question "That vs this. When would I use either in a sentence?" Second - "bonas" is not a great example here. Better to say "Tio estas bona."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EsperantoEthan

That vs this, simply. ĉi means closeness. ĉi tie=here and tie means there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

Not trying to be snarky, but what does "here" mean and what does "there" mean? When you hand someone something, it really doesn't make a difference if you say "here you go" or "there you go."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/senesperulo

No, but it does make a difference if you ask, "Shall we sit here or there?" Indicating two locations, one close by, and one farther away...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

The particle "ĉi" suggests closeness. When used with a word like "tie", it gives a similar contrast to the difference between "here" and "there." When there is no contrast, you don't really need to use it. There is no difference in simple contexts between pointing to a chair and saying "you can sit here" and pointing to the same chair saying "you can sit there"... so in that case, you don't need the "ĉi".

Within the course, a good rule of thumb is to always use "ĉi tie" for "here" and "tie" for there - but as I said above, in real life, the distinction isn't as hard and fast.

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