"You wrote it wrong."

Translation:你写错了。

December 12, 2017

9 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben-Sydney

Is "你写了错" grammatically incorrect? is it idiomatic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

It is incorrect, and it is not idiomic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TaylorLSho

Up until writing this sentence wrong (ironic Duo11), I was under the impression that it was okay to place 了 immediately after the verb when indicating action completion. In fact, I'm pretty sure that every quiz question I've encountered on Duolingo up until this point has accepted English-to-Chinese translations utilizing 了 in this way. Unfortunately, as it turns out, sentences must satisfy one of several criteria for this pattern to be permissible. What those criteria are can be found here: https://resources.allsetlearning.com/chinese/grammar/Expressing_completion_with_%22le%22#Putting_.E4.BA.86_After_a_Verb_with_an_Object


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nar781477

I'm not sure if this article goes over it, but for this specific exercise: putting 了 after 写 changes the meaning.

from: "You wrote it incorrectly."

to: "You wrote (the character) 错."

So you would be saying you literally wrote it, not that you wrote it incorrectly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanRasm

Thanks for the link!

There is an additional complication here. That article discusses when you can put 了 between verb and object, but 错 isn't an object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lightning_11

"You wrote it wrong."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrK_Ct

I don't understand the use of le. Sometimes it is in the sentence and sometimes at the end. How do I know where to put it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lightning_11

To put it simply, it means past tense. To put it more accurately, it marks the action as completed, since Chinese has no past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fekkezaum

你写得错了 was marked as incorrect. Is it? Why do we not need the 得 to connect the verb 写 with the adverb 错?

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