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  5. "Žofie už hodinu leží."

"Žofie hodinu leží."

Translation:Žofie has been resting for an hour.

December 12, 2017

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

My answer -- Žofie has been lying down for an hour already -- was wrong. The correct answer given was "Žofie has been lying IN BED for an hour already." The hints only refer to "lying," and the correct answer that appears here refers to "resting," with no reference to "in bed" anywhere that would help us with the translation. (I reported this in case my answer is actually okay.)

But if my answer really isn't acceptable, here are a couple of questions: If Žofie were lying on a sofa or on the floor, would she be doing something OTHER THAN "leží"? If so, what verb would be used? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Really? This dictionary says that to lie down is "to move into a position in which your body is flat, usually in order to sleep or rest". https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/lie-down?q=lying+down That would be lehnout (si), not ležet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Hmm... interesting. The construction "was lying down" is definitely in use... though it looks like it's less popular today than it once was. Ngrams


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

I will add it as the book examples show enough similar use cases. But, unfortunately, I have deleted the reports already.

I am not sure about just simple "lying". I would have thought it is correct but I suppose there is a reason why it was excluded.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

Just "lying," without some kind of indication as to where Žofie was lying -- like, in bed, on the couch, on the floor -- wouldn't be used. But there's no "where" in the CZ original. Meanwhile, "Žofie was lying for an hour" would actually make it sound like she's been making things up for the last 60 minutes. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

Forgive me, but how do these Ngrams examples show that "to be lying down" is used to mean "to be in the lying position" instead of "to be moving into the lying position"? The (missing) context can easily be e.g. "I was lying down when my wife came home" as in "I was just getting into bed at that time" (which would be "lehal si" in Czech, instead of "ležel").

Does what you're saying work for "sit down" and "stand up" as well? Can you be "sitting down for an hour"? I thought adding "up/down" to these verbs generally makes the verb describe assuming the state rather than being in the state.

But maybe this use of "lying down" is an exception stemming from the fact that "lie" is a homophone with "fib" and it would be confusing, as you wrote in a further comment. This is also why more and more native speakers use "lay" when they mean "lie"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liesvanhoorebeke

I don't understand why 'lying down' is not an acceptable translation for ležet? 'Resting' would be odpočívat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chatulov

Lying yes, lying down no. Lying down would mean, that the act of lying down take her an hour.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

See my earlier exchange with VladaFu regarding why "lying down" is acceptable (and now accepted).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris95041

This seems to be pretty idiomatic and I would suggest warrants a lot of further explanation. Firstly (nejdříve), the accusative use of hodina to mean 'for an hour' could definitely use some explanation and setup. Secondly, the idiomatic meaning of to lie (down) as to rest.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarauh

So, "hodina" would also be possible instead of "hodinu"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

No, how did you come to that conclusion?

It must be accusative - "hodinu".

The person (chris) you're replying to was just wondering why it has to be accusative and how he was supposed to know this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jarauh

Ok, thanks, I just misunderstood Chris.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/white.dog

Nemůžu si pomoct, ale překlad "Žofie has been resting for a hour/Žofie už hodinu leží" je dle mého nesmysl. Chybí mi tam "už". Odpočívat se dá i v jiné poloze než vleže.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Nejsem autor této věty a nebudu komentovat to ležení, ale to už nechybí. V mnoha větách ho zde považujeme za implicitně přítomné v tom předpřítomném průběhovém čase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WFkg7

I think that “Zofie is (already) lying for an hour” is also possible… Why not having two possibilities to translate this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

We have many possibilities. See BoneheadBass's comment above:

Just "lying," without some kind of indication as to where Žofie was lying -- like, in bed, on the couch, on the floor -- wouldn't be used. But there's no "where" in the CZ original. Meanwhile, "Žofie was lying for an hour" would actually make it sound like she's been making things up for the last 60 minutes. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artashes98

Why is "už" - "already" not included in the 'official' translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/endless_sleeper

The present perfect tense is more than enough to represent the meaning of 'už'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna619694

I do not think so. "Už"/"already" implies that Žofie is lazy because she has beem resting for so long, while the present perfect sentence merely states the neutral fact that she is resting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Artashes98

Agreed. "Už" indeed implicates some situation due to which Zofie has been lying down, either laziness or being tired, or maybe even a medical problem. It is not as neutral as the English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AgnusOinas

Nope, "už" doesn't imply anything here. The sentence sounds a bit incomplete without it - it is possible to omit it, but it just flows more naturally with it. It really is as close to a grammatical (meaningless, functional) word as a flexive language can get.

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