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"Voy a decirle."

Translation:I am going to tell you.

4 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FigTwig
FigTwig
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Why is "I am going to say it" wrong?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Languagease

Because that would be "Voy a decirlo." "Le" is him; "lo" is it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald
GigiGottwald
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Thanks a lot; now I understand. Here's a lingot for you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Torgrim1
Torgrim1
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"le" is him? I believe "le" can mean; you, him, it and you and that "lo" can mean him, you and it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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Indirect object pronoun: le (to him/her/it/you) Direct object pronoun: lo (him, it; you)

Not sure why people are saying "lo" cannot mean "him" or "you" or that "le" cannot be "it"? Without explaining properly, it can....

e.g No lo vi -> I didn't see him.

No creo que lo hayas conocido -> I dont think you've met him

In this example however, the "lo" (direct object) the thing you are going to say is implied so "you are going to say it to..it??? well it cant be "it" again unless you are talking to an inanimate object but that would be a strange construction. Therefore the "le" can only really mean on this occasion "you", "him" or "her".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul288769

Would 'voy a decirte' mean "I'm going to tell you" (where you = tú), and 'voy a decirle' could mean the same but with you = Usted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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yes voy a decirle would mean you in the formal you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/victor17275

They have had me confused about this. However, while I still have to figure it out for the purposes of my own comprehension, this is DEFINITELY more in line with what I remember from school!!!! (Long long ago)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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nope. le can be a third person: he, she, formal you. lo is: it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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Direct object pronoun: lo (him, it; you)

e.g No lo vi -> I didn't see him.

No creo que lo hayas conocido -> I dont think you've met him

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GigiGottwald
GigiGottwald
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Same mistake, FigTwig. Could someone please explain?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tristan.D
Tristan.D
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Here you have to say to whom you're going to say it. In this case, you're going to say IT to HIM. "him" (or you) is hence the indirect object and is therefore translated as "le" not "lo". The direct object, "lo", is apparently implied.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luke9

it ends in le meaning that it is to a person

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lawsci
lawsci
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Why only tell "you" for decirle and not "him"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

"her" would work too. :-)

And actually, given that "singular they" is gramatically valid in English, "I'm going to tell them," is perfectly fine for this too, though currently not accepted.

http://motivatedgrammar.wordpress.com/2009/09/10/singular-they-and-the-many-reasons-why-its-correct/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Wouldn't that need to be Voy a decirles?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

No. They are a singular person, despite the peculiar plural-seeming grammatical structure.

In English, you can refer to a singular person of indeterminate gender as "they". In Spanish, you'd use le (or lo if they're a direct object).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/victor17275

I didn't see what you meant at first. Now I do. This is also gender neutral...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The indirect object plural pronoun is les, so I am still confused. Your very interesting academic reference isn't speaking to the Spanish. I believe Voy a decirle = I am going to tell her (or) him (or) you, but not them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

"Them" is sometimes a singular pronoun in English.

If anyone tries to get in, stop them. Si alguien trata de entrar, deténgalo.

"Them" here is singular -- it agrees with "anyone". And you can tell that "anyone" is singular because it's wrong to say, "If anyone try to get in." Translating this particular "them" as "los" would be wrong. The correct translation is "lo", singular.

This is a feature of English grammar that many an English speaker does not recognize, because they use it without ever thinking about it -- like I just did in this sentence.

Also, the linked article isn't just some kind of academic theory -- it's citing the greatest writers of the English language. If you think that "they/them/their" cannot be plural, your belief is at odds with Chaucer, Shakespeare, Jane Austen, C.S. Lewis, etc. You are not a better speaker of English than they were.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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Talca

I agree with you. "les' is the indirect object pronoun for "them"

and

"los/las" are direct object pronouns for "them"

update:

I forgot to add, as you said, that this is Spanish we are talking about and not English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/le - some usted involvement possibly

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eey91
Eey91Plus
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In this case you have to know it could be referring to "Usted" (voy a decirle a usted), or "Él" (voy a decirle a él). But both should be correct in this case

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGibbins

Him is accepted (13th July 2014)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babybrotherangel

accepted " him"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sharkfin

How would you say "I go to tell him"? Seems pretty close.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmx11
mmx11
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I guess it is the same. "Decirle" can mean either "tell you" (usted) or "tell him" (él). So i guess "decirla" is "tell her", but how is "tell you" (tú) said? Decirte?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaiman620

You could clarify who you're going to tell by saying "a (whoever)". So it could be " voy a decirle a él" or "voy a decirle a Usted" or "voy a decirle a mi amigo", etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haridamo2

So, "Voy a..." means "I will..." -- an assertion that I will do something in the future. But how do you say "I go..." ??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TranMinhNhut
TranMinhNhut
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Kindly enlighten me for the difference bw "le voy a decir" and "voy a decirle"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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the answer is: 0.

there is no difference. compounds of object pronouns and verbs are very common in spanish. see following link. http://www.studyspanish.com/lessons/dopro3.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jiana30

Really confused here. Wouldn't "te voy a decir" have the same meaning?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thekatmorgan
thekatmorgan
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voy a decirle is using the formal you not the personal you, so not quite the same meaning no

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tryin2
Tryin2
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is anyone having trouble with the drop down conjugation list? i'm getting nothing.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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then ignore them and learn vocabularies in another manner.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barbs62

I said, "I am going to tell. " I do not see where "you" is in the sentence. Doesn't the le mean "it". In American English it is a common expression, usually by a nasty child to a sibling: "I am going to tell" meaning whatever the others just did is something that will earn the approbium of the parent(s)/minder and they are going to be in trouble.

Is there anything like that in Spanish culture?

I am going to ask that this translation be accepted. Would be interested in comments.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Khristafer
Khristafer
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I'm just not going to understand this "decirle" thing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StabbySteph

Am I the only one sho found the audio really hard to understand?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/2001chip
2001chip
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No, I did too. I got this as a "type what you hear" question. Even after typing it wrong and seeing the correct answer, I still didn't think it was very clear. I thought "decir" was something starting with T

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Betu256

Shouldn't the sentence be 'Voy a decir te"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanBonBon

I still dont get this. Both Voy a decirle and Voy a decirlo can be used for I'm going to tell you (formal)? So when would you use one over the other?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dak14
dak14
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I typed " I am going to tell you." The program said I'm wrong, then showed exactly what I typed as the correct answer. WTF?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RudyGasparelli

I think that "I am going to say to you should be an acceptable translation"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luke9

lingots please

3 years ago