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  5. "手机被我的弟弟用坏了。"

"手机被我的弟弟用坏了。"

Translation:The cellphone was broken by my younger brother.

December 17, 2017

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleksandro_RU

Why is yong needed here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kalexchu

坏 is an adjective, so a verb like 用 (to use) is needed. Personally, I would say 弄坏 (to make broken).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CinnamonTe1

How does 用 (a verb) attach to 坏 (an adjective) without using 得 ?

It doesn't show up as a verb on Yellowbridge or Google, so why doesn't it follow the grammar rule for 得 ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George630371

用坏/弄坏 is a verb which means break something. They shouldn't be seen as separated


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CinnamonTe1

Okay, I found it as a verb on MDBG. It makes me wonder if it is a newer verb or only used as one in certain places. I like how some English dictionaries show the time period for when a word first came into use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hq4

The phone was broken by my brother.

Not many people say 'younger brother'. Not many people say 'cellphone'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

"Little brother" is more common than the formal-sounding "younger brother". If you have a little brother and a big brother it's very common to use the "big" or "little" and not just "brother" on its own. Especially if you're talking to somebody who knows you and your brothers.

Americans say "cellphone" or just "cell". In Australia we say "mobile phone" or "mobile". But these days they're the most usual kind of telephone so lots of people just say "phone". All versions should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xaexvsgrtvuktitq

If we mean something other than cell/mobile we say landline. The distinction in phone numbers (04 for mobile) also helps keep those clear for us. - Melbourne, Australia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laszlo914063

What if the younger brother is bigger than the older one? Furthermore, "little brother" is used in the childhood, rather than for pensioners.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Physical size does not have a bearing on "little brother" and "big brother" in standard usage. Those terms only indicate the brothers' relative age.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ivitcyex

The Chinese specifies younger brother.


[deactivated user]

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dennis419100

    Mobile Phone should be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaixinchun

    Handphone should be accepted as well


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiscoMan7

    Not really sure about just "broken" - but more precisely, the Chinese suggests "broken through use".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George630371

    Theoretically yes, but first, it's just "broken" in English, and second, 用坏 aims to express the status that something was broken. When you really want to emphasize how it was broken, you should add a verb like smash, or hit etc.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatriciusFlavius

    No, broken means 破坏, i.e. simply destroy without the meaning of 'use'; 用坏 means broken after long use.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JKVLim

    "The cell phone is broken by my younger brother" was not accepted. :( Is/was it because of is/was?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkBird5

    I understand that it is using the word for younger brother, but this should also accept brother.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ExecutiveLight

    "My little brother broke the phone" should've been accepted, but was rejected.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wadafik

    the sentence is supposed to be passive hence the 被 character.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AussieCrisp

    It needs to be in the passive voice to reflect the use of 被 in this sentence.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveLommen

    Passive form is required here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jacques439990

    "was broken" vs "has been damaged".... Wtf????????

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