"Nous aimons les semaines culturelles."

Translation:We like the cultural weeks.

3/17/2013, 12:53:27 AM

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nat10sk2
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What is common context for "cultural weeks"? I feel like this is some event or holiday, but not a common usage. Maybe cultural centers would be better.

3/17/2013, 12:53:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/lpacker
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These "cultural weeks" are a common thing in Europe - it's a EU thing.

6/29/2013, 8:26:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
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Lol I'm in the EU and I've never heard of it. I'm English... Going to have to Google this.

12/12/2014, 9:45:21 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JugderGurr

Culture weeks are common in multi-cultural/national countries,say former USSR or Russia. Days of Tataria in Moscow,for example. It's strange you don't have Welsh/Irish/Scottish festivals in London. I hope britons have such traditions,just call them other way.

8/22/2015, 9:11:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
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Never heard of anything like this. Also Britain is very multi-cultural. For a start we're made up of 4 countries and then we also have a load of ex-common wealth people living here. London is only 40% white British to put things into perspective...

8/24/2015, 4:05:19 PM

[deactivated user]

    We do have 'cultural weeks' or 'cultural festivals' in England but they tend to be very localised, and some regions don't have them at all. Certainly where I come from in rural Cheshire we have the occasional cultural festival lasting up to a week, most commonly celebrating local and European culture. Think: Morris dancers, village fetes, 'continental markets' (from Europe), etc.

    9/25/2018, 10:23:05 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/darryl870

    hmmm the Patrick Day celebrations in Manchester are bigger than the ones in Dublin so that is not completely true. We just live daily with each other and don't think of having to do this sort of thng

    11/1/2016, 8:46:35 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/darryl870

    I am also English and have never heard of it!

    11/1/2016, 8:44:09 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaryAnne20

    But, what are they exactly? Is it like an ongoing cultural festival, or something?

    11/23/2013, 1:28:06 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Alisonj3
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    Maybe they mean Cultural Heritage Weeks? Like this http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/cultureheritage/heritage/EHD/default_en.asp? I guess we'd call them cultural festivals.

    4/15/2014, 11:59:55 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
    Plus
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    Yup; had them in my school and uni. Introducing and celebrating other cultures. Fun stuff :)

    8/7/2014, 11:54:39 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/RJR99SS

    Oh. Well in america we just drink beer and bomb people every day.

    9/17/2018, 4:02:42 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kevin968039

    @RJR, in America, we also have the freedom to vote such drunken warmongers out of office.

    10/18/2018, 1:26:25 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/RJR99SS

    No we don't.

    2/22/2019, 7:20:15 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Kevin968039

    ... il est? Pas en Angleterre (que je me souvienne)

    10/18/2018, 1:08:18 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/_Avencia_
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    I remember having them in elementary school and in college, although I think they were referred to as "multicultural week/day", rather than "cultural week/day". There were booths showcasing things from various cultures (food, writing, images, music, etc.)
    In the college version, I saw students from countries other than the U.S. selling food they enjoyed in their native country. As a reference point, I live in the southwestern area of the United States.

    8/13/2014, 6:49:06 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/oskalingo
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    Weeks of culture would be a more likely way to describe it, if you were going to have such a thing.

    9/30/2013, 12:27:01 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/lilmoose17

    Couldn't 'culture weeks' as a noun work too? It didn't take it, but I guess this is the adjectives section...

    3/9/2014, 5:46:32 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

    Nonetheless, "culture week(s)" sounds more natural to me (though I don't really mind "cultural"), like "heritage day(s)" (though if we put them together, we have to say "cultural heritage day(s)/week(s)", not "culture...").

    5/2/2018, 12:27:40 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/ladonnaeibhlin
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    Could you translate this "Culture Weeks"? That sounds more natural to me, but Duolingo won't accept it.

    12/15/2014, 12:17:02 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasGabr13

    Oct 2017 'Culture weeks' still not accepted

    10/23/2017, 2:19:42 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/FarrelDeSo
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    Was I the only person who got it wrong because of the two meanings of aimer?

    9/18/2014, 1:20:36 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

    Possibly. I gather that DL has recently revamped its translations for "aimer", because they were too loose and sloppy before. I believe DL is now sticking a little closer to common usage, which is - for people, "aimer" means "love", "aimer bien" or other modified forms mean "like"; for objects or abstract ideas or whatever, "aimer" means "like" , modified forms of "aimer" mean weakier forms of "like", and "adorer" means "love".

    I think I have that right..

    9/18/2014, 8:55:35 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
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    In my hometown we have a thing called Global Fest, which celebrates international cultures with food, music, crafts, etc. It only lasts for one day each year, but I assume this close to what is meant by "cultural week."

    7/9/2014, 1:28:47 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/gfmuffin

    We never refer to "cultural weeks" in the U.S.

    7/2/2013, 10:28:51 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/jennapeterson88

    In Canadian schools, we sometimes celebrate "multiculture" weeks, so I translated this sentence as "We like culture weeks" and it wasn't accepted. When I hover over the word "culturelles" it suggests culture as well as cultural. Why is this not an acceptable answer?

    2/5/2016, 5:02:24 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/CSA_GW
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    2018-11-15: also using "culture weeks" and was refused.

    11/15/2018, 7:31:28 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/peteredout

    in the USA - there are NO cultural weeks - weeks of culture is OK

    8/15/2013, 8:03:22 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

    Never heard either construction here in Canada (or in the US when I lived there). Clearly this is a European thing. I think therefore, since it's not a current term in English, that any reasonable translation should be allowed.

    1/26/2014, 2:39:52 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/RabbieY
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    actually not uncommon in England which is the home country of English

    7/25/2014, 10:19:12 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

    (I'll just whisper this, but over here we tend to think of England as part of Europe. <gasp>)

    9/18/2014, 8:51:07 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/SkiThe802

    This sentence in English means absolutely nothing to me. I can understand Duolingo trying to teach common phrases that are exactly direct translations, but I am learning French to use almost exclusively in Quebec, where this still doesn't mean anything. While all these words make sense, the sentence does not.

    10/24/2017, 2:52:06 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
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    So how to determine whether the adjective comes before, or after the noun? I have noticed both ways in this section.

    10/24/2017, 8:59:23 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/JordanToilette96

    I have never heard this in English... I just stared at the screen in disbelief.

    1/2/2018, 5:52:11 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/MattTomlin5

    What's a cultural week?

    3/19/2018, 9:32:11 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/hedystafford
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    I think in UK we would say Weeks of Culture for planned events.

    8/15/2018, 9:08:44 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Nige788085

    In Belfast we have culture week, it's called Belfast Mela.

    11/27/2018, 6:30:48 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Boredomramsey

    "Cultural weeks"?? Must be a European thing, I've never heard of this in North America.

    1/4/2019, 9:44:00 PM

    https://www.duolingo.com/PeaceJoyPancakes

    I hadn't either, but apparently in New York City there's a Latin American Cultural Week.

    A Google search brings up events in the UK, the rest of Europe, and Africa.

    1/5/2019, 12:38:53 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/koreanjesu5

    Cultural weeks like that weeks a truck run into peoples? Cultural enrichment weeks

    12/15/2018, 6:09:37 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/Henri544487

    Another nonsense statement.

    12/23/2018, 6:38:49 AM

    https://www.duolingo.com/fuentesgeorge

    What the ❤❤❤❤ is a cultural week?

    8/17/2016, 3:15:50 AM
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