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"Usted ha llevado las fotos a su casa."

Translation:You have taken the photos to your house.

1
5 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bluemax89

I wonder why, "You have brought the pictures to your house.", is wrong?

11
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

In terms of the English side of things, "brought" should probably be completely acceptable. It would sound natural in English; translations should be semantically accurate more than literally accurate. Oh well...

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesBlask
JamesBlask
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This is because you're used to using incorrect English. "Bring" means move something here. "Take" means move something there. The only time "brought" would work in this context is if the speaker is at "your house", in which case they would have just said "acqui" instead of "a su casa".

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Except that "traer" means to bring and "llevar" generally does not. If you try to use them interchangeably in Spanish, you might thoroughly confuse the Spanish-speaking person you are talking to. I know that because I've done it and resolved to be more careful in the future.

When I was at my house with a Spanish-speaking person, I told her (in Spanish) that I was bringing (traer) something to my sister (who lives about a half hour away). It was interpreted to mean that I was bringing my sister to my house. I had to later clarify that I was taking (llevar) something to my sister. Had I used the proper word "llevar" then it would not have caused confusion.

https://www.enforex.com/language/llevar-traer.html

0
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

"To bring" is "traer." I know that in colloquial English we often use "bring" and "take" interchangeably, but I do think there is technically a difference (e.g., bring it here, take it there).

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Doug, A "technical" difference? I have been studying Spanish for 8 years, not full time of course, and I still do not correctly choose between traer and llevar. This is VERY important in Spanish. It works like come and go, i.e. it depends on the direction of the movement vis a vis the speaker, and sometimes of the one spoken to.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

To add to what Melita2 says: It is also very important in English.
The fact that some English speakers use some words incorrectly ("colloquially") doesn't mean we should be teaching incorrect English to non-English speakers.

BTW, I don't think that all "colloquial" speech is incorrect. Some so-called-by-some "colloquial" speech is simply informal. Nothing is wrong with informal speech in the correct setting.

But one does a disfavor to non-native English speakers, who may wish to use their English in a formal setting, by being unaware of the differences.

0
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

SGuthrie, Thanks for supporting my point of view! Here's a lingot for you. Melita

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

W Thanks. BTW I corrected a typo of mine--changed "Spanish" to "English", which is what I intended to say.

BTW. I enjoy seeing you frequently on these comments.

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InfamousMrSatan
InfamousMrSatan
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I think when translating from Spanish to English, 'brought' is perfectly natural and acceptable. I think when going the other direction, you might have to correctly select traer or llevar depending on the context.

I reported it. Taken = Carried = Brought.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"Taken" and "brought" are very different. One "takes something TO" somewhere. One "brings somet hing FROM " somewhere. Thus, in a sense, they are the opposite! See also JamesBlank above.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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I'm certainly not going to tell another English-speaker how they should properly speak English. However, if you make the assumption that traer and llevar are just as interchangeable in Spanish, it's likely to lead to many misunderstandings. If you want Spanish-speaking people to understand you, it pays to be cognizant of the difference.

0
Reply4 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mommasspanish1

anyone know why i can't say 'has llevado las fotos a su casa' ? i was counted wrong

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clawedinvader

siebolt is right. This is something that I occasionally do myself and it is annoying when I do. Basically you have used the 'informal tú' conjugation of 'haber' when you wrote "has" (the formal conjugation is 'ha') so you must use the informal 'tu' for the word 'your' instead of the formal 'su'.

I hope that makes sense as it's difficult to write out what I am trying to say. In short, if you use the informal you (tú), then you have to carry this through the sentence, the same with the formal you (usted). So in order to correct your sentence you either need to change it to "tu casa" at the end (as siebolt said) or to "ha llevado" at the beginning.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheBigE1980
TheBigE1980
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Like siebolt and clawedinvader said, your pronoun has to agree with the verb conjugation. You either have to use the "tú" form in both spots or the "Ud." form in both spots.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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try writing "tu casa".

3
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/auntdotdot

Yes, I think your reply should be accepted, since it is possible to say "You have taken the photos to HIS/HER house.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/upfielder
upfielder
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Don't you use 'sacar' for photos?

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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To mean "take a photo" I gather(had to look it up) but this sentence is about carrying objects and the fact they are "photos" does not matter.

9
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siebolt
siebolt
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llevar a su casa: to take home???

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hroes
hroes
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I think "You have taken the pictures to your house." is also a correct translation.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sunrises
sunrises
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How to say "You have taken photos AT your house", as in snapping pictures in the front yard?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Hola sun, Has tomado fotos en tu casa. Or Has sacado fotos en tu casa. (informal tú)

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mkw2014

How about your HOME instead of HOUSE? Or should it be HOGAR instead?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VictoriaTheOwl

I'm a bit confused by english version of this sentence, why "take the photos TO" but not "take the photos OF"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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take photos of = sacar fotos de

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gaylesaf

Photos in Spanish are feminine

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LindaVanSc

it has to be tu casa

0
Reply3 months ago