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  5. "On je tady bez kalhot?"

"On je tady bez kalhot?"

Translation:He is here without pants?

December 21, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelixWenzel

No matter what the grammar is here, semantically speaking this is a very embarrassing situation, like from a nightmare where you go to work and then realise that you have no trousers on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mickie1060

Could be it's just SpongeBob.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenda48

"Is he without pants here?" Is it always only wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

To me it sounds somewhat strange -- just one person's opinion -- but it is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ken55414

I hear an extra syllable in kalhot, ie kal(a)hot. Is that the way Czechs or the computer would say it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/endless_sleeper

There's no extra syllable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GinaHearn4

I hear it as well. It sounds like kalahot to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

You are probably just not used to hear l in that position. But in my headphones I can only hear "kalhot" /kalɦot/. Check also https://forvo.com/search/kalhoty/

There is no extra syllable present. If you hear it, train your ear to ignore it in Czech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hatch-Slack

I think it is about ”h” sound which is always pronounced from throat. That why it sounds like there is a vowel in front of it. ”H” is a different letter/sound than ”ch” which is pronounced like English ”h”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

h is quite the same as the English H in help or high. The CH sound does not exist in English but does exist in Scots.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dlehrke

Yeah it's there in the slow and fast. It's not a whole syllable but it's like 'kale-hot'. The google translate audio sounds fine, that is like kalhot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianSille2

I believe what you hear is a svarabhakti. This is a sound inserted in many languages between two consonants for ease of pronunciation. It is rare or absent from modern English and can be almost imperceptible to native speakers of the languages in which it occurs. Many Czech words have few or no vowels and would be impossible to pronounce without it.

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