"he, she, it"

Translation:er, sie, es

December 21, 2017

75 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethan638612

I can't tell sie er and es apart. Any help?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mia337868

Er is he Es is it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Layla243511

Er is he Sie is she


[deactivated user]

    Hi Ethan, er means "he", "sie" means "she" and "es" means "it".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parker0204

    Think of sie as she that normally helps. Er and es confuse me sometimes but it's easy to memorize


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lucasbiller

    Er looks like her, so I get confused. But i like your tip, Sie = She


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MetalGoddessRox

    sie is for her es is for it


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AarohiRane1

    I thought i was the only one


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlesAbs

    If Sie is used as a proper "you" and sie is use as "she" how do you tell them apart?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Context.

    Also, when they're the subject, they take different verb forms, for example, sie ist "she is" versus Sie sind "you are". (But you can confuse Sie "you" and sie "they".)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

    Let me ask you this: would a German pick somebody of a crowd, point to a man and say "Er!"? In English I feel quite confident in saying that would be "Him!". Also, we point at ourselves and say "Me!" French roots I should imagine....."Moi!"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matthias881490

    It is considered rude to point to a stranger but if you do, it would be 'Er' or 'Der da' (informal, slang, like 'that one') if you are not talking to the man but to one of your friends, for instance. If you point to a stranger and want to adress him, you would say 'Entschuldigen Sie' (Excuse me sir) or He, du! (Really rude, Hey, you!')


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

    Nobody said he was a stranger. Perhaps he's your cousin. Or an old college roommate. Maybe we're looking at old pictures. In any event rudeness is perfectly grammatical.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

    You should still err on the side of politeness, though. Sure, if it's a cousin, you can probably say "He, du!" and punch them in the arm, but for anyone else better safe than sorry.
    [2019/04/01]


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P.Summie

    How do you pronounce "sie"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Pretty much as if it were spelled "zee" in English -- like the way Americans say the name of the letter Z.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P.Summie

    Oh... Okay, Thanks ✌


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac542193

    Whats the difference between es and ist?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    es - "it". A personal pronoun.

    ist - "is". A verb form, from sein "to be".

    For example, es ist schwarz = it is black.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

    es - Spanish for "is". ist - German for "is".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/officialDNA506

    I had no problem understanding the possessives and grammar usage. In many ways it is similar to French, which we all learn here in Canada in school mandatorily


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

    Like French but with four cases and twice the exceptions, all of it hidden under the veil of logic. :)
    [2019/04/01]


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karthika209962

    What is the difference between "du" and "ihr"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    You use du when speaking to one person, ihr when speaking to several people.

    Du bist ein Mann. "You are a man." (to one person)

    Ihr seid Männer. "You are men." (to several people)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthMartha1

    The pronoun "es" is also for persons e.g. das Kinder, es spielt im Garten. It is not necessary es


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    es - it

    ist - is

    es ist - it is, it's


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amireles00

    Why are the woman's pronunciations more enunciated?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chu517205

    Whats the difference between er and der?


    [deactivated user]

      Er means 'he' and der is the Masculine definite article.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ahurv

      خیلی سخته


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanNirri

      ist = is elsewhere in the course... why is it 'es' in this case?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      The German word ist means "is".

      The German word es means "it".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanNirri

      Thank you, I realized that after I left the comment.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      @Miha137089:

      So they can both be used interchangeably in plural form?

      No.

      du and ihr are informal.

      Sie is formal.

      A shopkeeper talking to her customers would use Sie sind...; a father talking to his children would use ihr seid.... Both are talking to several people at once, but the shopkeeper would not use ihr seid nor would the father use Sie sind -- it's simply an inappropriate level of formality.

      Imagine a political summit where one country's leader addresses the others with "Yo, dudes and dudettes" -- or a group of 18-year-olds on spring break where one of them uses "ladies and gentlemen" to address the others.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChizomamLe

      Hallo...Er ist HE und Es ist IT


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Souleater112

      Er and es are confusing me


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Telzhu15

      aku orang Indonesia jadi aku komen pake bahasa indonesia aku ke tekan


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rapidslmao

      why is it needed to be in a certain order?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oLGXZAsw

      I gave you the correct answers. Why were they not accepted?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      There's not enough information in your report to give an answer.

      If this happens again, it would be helpful if you could provide a screenshot.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NeetikaS

      Why it is not ist , but es?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      Because the English has "it" (= es) and not "is" (= ist).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatharinaK99

      Ist - to be, es - it


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

      Sein = to be. Ist = is.

      ich bin
      du bist
      er ist
      sie ist
      es ist
      wir sind
      ihr seid
      sie sind
      Sie sind

      [2019/04/01]


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David736256

      This isn't a sentence, it's a list of words - calling questions like this a list of words might help reduce confusion.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

      Nobody is confused as to whether this is a sentence or not, though, because it obviously isn't one and isn't supposed to be.
      [2019/04/01]


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Creativity337870

      He=er (masculine) She=sie (feminine) It= es (neutral)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/24tyler

      I wish they would change the order of these that way I would have to think about it more. At this point I've memorized the order and it doesn't really help me


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia327802

      He - Er She-sie It-es


      [deactivated user]

        How is Er in german he in english?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        They both refer to a male who is neither the speaker or the listener.

        "Do you know Tom? Yes; he is rich."

        Kennst du Tom? Ja; er ist reich.

        "he" / er refer to Tom: a male who is neither speaking nor listening, but is a third person.

        Thus the German er corresponds to the English "he".

        Or did I misunderstand your question? What did you think German er was in English / what English "he" was in German?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mercedeskh

        I just checked with a native German speaker also fluent in English who said, der, die, das also make sense in the german mind.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanneDeGreef

        That's "the, the, the". Technically, yes, it's possible, but "er, sie, es" is the logical answer.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daneira659718

        How come when I did another phrase it said sie means you but it says here sie means she?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

        If it's capitalized "Sie" is the formal you. If it's not (sie), it's she. Just remember your Italian. Formal you: Lei. She: lei.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nada806254

        J is called y in germman


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hud214

        y is called a greek i in italian.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrashCanLm

        I typed it right but i got a wrong Maybe it was because i didnt add spaces


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mia-Nicole1

        I can't tell ist and ea apart. =(


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rajarshi_Roy

        Just now saw two different answers for same question how can it be


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SanneDeGreef

        Some words have more than one translation/meaning. For example, 'Frau' can be both 'woman' and 'Mrs.' depending on the context. Both are valid.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taia_hopkins

        Just a quick question what does it mean for a verb to irreuglar? Thank you so much!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        what does it mean for a verb to irreuglar?

        If it's irregular, it does not follow the regular pattern.

        For example, in English, the "he, she, it" form is formed by adding -s (drink: he drinks), but the verb "have" is irregular: we do not say "he haves" (just add -s) but instead we say "he has". This is something learners just have to memorise.

        Similarly, the past tense is regularly formed by adding -ed (in English) or -t- (in German), e.g. live: he lived; leben: er lebte. But some verbs do something different, e.g. give: he gave; geben: er gab. These are irregular and their forms have to be memorised.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarrietteE3

        I keep writing it right but it keeps saying its wrong


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

        What exactly are you writing?

        Do you have a screenshot showing your answer and the error message?


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jimmy449164

        This isn't taking my answer even though it's the same as the "correct answer". "er, sie, es"...


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanMackin6

        I am confused with er and est


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abdeldjeba5

        What is the rule masculine and feminine? Eine, ein, Sie, er, es


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sylvia39524

        awesome i was right i am germen now its esay


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rapidslmao

        funny comment, thanks for lightening up the mood


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/9z0

        why does this need order

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