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  5. "He keeps on being a bad boy."

"He keeps on being a bad boy."

Translation:Il continue d'être mauvais garçon.

March 17, 2013

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexCGuest

Is "Il continue d'être mauvais garçon" really correct? If so, why is "un" unnecessary? Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

maybe you should remember one basic rule about French: we love small words, and articles in particular. but there are times when a particular emphasis, a special turn of phrase, a legacy from older days (+ a number of still valid rules, of course) make us use nouns without articles.

personally, if I had to translate this English sentence, I would say: "il continue à être un méchant garçon" (which is very correct French, not a special twist of my own mind).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oskalingo

I put 'continue à être' (and was marked wrong). Is there any difference in nuance between using 'continue à' and 'continue de'? Both seem to be in use.

http://www.linguee.fr/francais-anglais/traduction/continuer+%E0+%EAtre.html

http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1241356


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Nowadays, "continuer à" and "continuer de" are generally interchangeable.

You may choose "de" if the verb starts with a vowel sound, so as to avoid a hiatus:

  • il continue d'avoir vs il continue à avoir. (A-A)
  • but the hiatus is less marked in "il continue à être" (A-Ê)

According to the official rules (l'Académie Française), "continuer à" should be prefered when the action is in progress:

  • l'homme prend son verre et continue à boire (he is finishing what he started)

And "continuer de" should be prefered for habits:

  • l'ivrogne continue de boire (the drunk keeps his bad habits).

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djbrubacher

excéllent comme d'habitude, sitesurf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/greatlanguages

Why was I marked wrong then??? I used "a" (with an accent)???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boscoc

Why do we add " d' " before etre here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

French verb "continuer" is built with preposition "à" or "de".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheEugenius

I tried à, it didn't work :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonesd1959

If "continuer" is the right verb, why does the list of possible translations for keeps not include it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Because "continuer" = keep on, not "keep" in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ByersJ.

Mechant=mean, not bad. I lost a heart because I only picked the translation with "mauvais". Not fair!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

You could have "un", no problem. But this is idiomatic, as if "mauvais/méchant garçon" were a label, like "bon élève"; in that case, it works like an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skjerns

Shouldn't "méchant" be after 'garcon'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WitchofTime

No, méchant is an adjective relating to "goodness", like bon, mauvais, etc., so it goes before the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emnsstar

Can it be "Il continuer d'être méchant garçon." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"continuer" (infinitive) is to be conjugated exactly like manger:

je continue, tu continues, il/elle/on continue, nous continuons, vous continuez, ils/elles continuent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emnsstar

Oh.. I see... Thank you :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/damir256786

Shoud't be "Nous mangeons"...and not "mangons"..so it id not like manger?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Mangeons" has an extra -e- so that the soft sound of the G can be kept.

The same applies to the gerund "en mangeant" (while/by eating).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Omoikane

"malin" should be a viable substitute for "un garçon méchant".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

No, because "malin" means "smart/clever" ( if not applied to an illness or tumor...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frogcarguy

I used "Il reste" rather than "Il continue". Is that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boringtomi

I tried that, too... “Il reste être un mauvais garçon”. Can someone tell me what’s wrong with that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"rester" is a state verb, like: "être, paraître, sembler, devenir, demeurer".

Within that list, only "sembler" and "paraître" can add infinitive "être".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boringtomi

OK, many thanks Sitesurf, your help - as always - is invaluable!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Z.Shan
Mod
Plus
  • 2255

How about just "Il reste un mauvais garçon.", meaning "He stays a bad boy"? Does it work here?

2015.05.14 EDT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I would use "he remains a bad boy" instead of "he stays".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Z.Shan
Mod
Plus
  • 2255

Thank you, Sitesurf!

2015.05.15 EDT


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maceachern

I've never seen the word "mechant" before, how am I supposed to know its meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickMeans

Duolingo does start bringing new words into the "strengthen skills" exercises as you get stronger.. It can be frustrating if you feel as if you are being tested, and with unfair questions. Just try to remember that you are just being nudged along, and there is no devious person writing the phrases trying to trip you up. The writers/programers are however trying to help you learn not to make some of the more common mistakes in speaking that would annoy a French speaker. It also helps if you read the notes provided after the tiles that list each of the lessons in a skill. Please be patient and try to just have fun and learn. You will enjoy it if you struggle on!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickMeans

Why does mauvais need to come before garçon, and mechant need to go after?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Both "mauvais" and méchant" can be placed before or after a noun, with a nuance in meaning (subjective vs objective).

"mauvais garçon" is a fixed phrase meaning "bad boy".

But you can easily say "c'est un garçon mauvais (=> I can prove it)" if this is a fact (although being particularly judgmental, this description should be more subjective than objective).

If you tell your son: "tu es un méchant garçon", the meaning will be "you are a naughty boy", more or less meaning that at this very moment, "he is being" as such.

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