"She is looking for her cat."

Translation:Elle cherche son chat.

3/17/2013, 9:28:46 AM

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/meno123

Shouldn't the response "Elle cherche 'pour' son chat" be correct as the word "for" is a direct translation of "pour".

3/17/2013, 9:28:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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French verb "chercher" is built with a direct object, unlike the English "look for".

3/17/2013, 10:57:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HelbentForleder

What's the difference between 'chercher' and 'rechercher'?

5/19/2016, 9:52:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/nuno_silva

Why isn't "Elle cherche SA chat" ?

7/19/2013, 10:56:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ProDialga

Every noun has a gender. "Chat" is a masculine noun. The "déterminant" (the word that comes before the noun such as le, la, un, une, sa, son) must be masculine too. Therefore, we say "son chat". If you want to talk about a female cat, we say "sa chatte". Hope that helps :)

7/24/2013, 5:45:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/nuno_silva

Totally ;) Thanks a lot

7/24/2013, 3:48:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/aidenfry

I think i get it, but what if it is "her male male cat?"

5/26/2014, 3:53:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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"Male male"....huh? A male cat is "un chat". The choice of "son" vs. "sa" is based on the noun it refers to; it says nothing about whether it is "his" or "her" cat. I.e., "Elle cherche son chat" (or) "elle cherche sa chatte" would be translated exactly the same way in English. She is looking for her cat (or, if you feel you must explore the possibilities) She is looking for his cat. One normally assumes that the thing being looked for belongs to the person doing the looking.

3/10/2016, 8:19:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Khalider

Does the cat have to be female?

12/18/2014, 9:29:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dofranciscojr

It doesn't. But you need to say "son chat" for a male one and "sa chatte" for a female cat.

12/25/2014, 11:20:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/laurac13

cherchant vs cherche

2/2/2014, 3:24:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"cherchant" is the present participle of "chercher".

we don't use it often, and especially not to translate the English continuous tenses, which do not exist as verbal forms in French.

So, if you get "she is looking for her cat", you translate either with simple present: "elle cherche son chat" or with "elle est en train de chercher son chat", where "en train de + infinitive" correctly translates the idea of an ongoing action.

2/2/2014, 6:02:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/laurac13

Thanks! Helps me a lot!

2/3/2014, 1:52:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/andrew.ram

Why chatte instead of chat?

7/18/2014, 11:59:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jcutler97

I doesn't matter... but chatte is a female cat and chat is a male cat. you can choose but each should follow their respective demonstrative adjective

8/26/2014, 8:14:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mahankr
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Is the audio for this sentence correct? It sounds like there is extra syllable added between cherche and son? Is it added because the end of cherche and beginning of son sound so much alike? Or would a native French speaker speaking at a normal conversational pace leave out the extra syllable and blend the words together?

8/24/2015, 2:11:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
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You may be hearing a difference especially in the male audio which is a different regional pronunciation but still perfectly valid French. It's a good idea to hear different pronunciations because out in the real world, you will hear a lot of things.

3/10/2016, 8:21:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DorielShac

Pardon Mon new here what is the diffrence between Regarde and Chercher? My teacher always say Regarde when i lose focus lol.

11/18/2017, 10:18:57 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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Regarder = to look at

Chercher = to look for

11/19/2017, 5:01:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenndreAi

How can you knoe if it is "te" or "son"

1/29/2018, 1:15:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GlenndreAi

I mean "ton" or "son"

1/29/2018, 1:17:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Samuel362617

ton is to say "your" - object (masculine) son is to say "his/her" - object (masculine) If objects are feminine you would use ta "your" or sa "his/her"

8/24/2018, 6:17:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Joshua707772

If the noun in the sentence is "cat" and there is a possessive in front of it... "her". Then why does the sentence not start with C'est. I obviously dont have this rule quite figired out just yet ..

3/3/2018, 5:32:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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When you describe an animal, a thing or person with the verb "ĂȘtre":

  • "C'est un chat" = it is a cat.
  • "C'est une femme" = she is a woman
  • "C'est un homme" = he is a man.

Now with the sentence here:

  • "She is looking for her cat": "her" is conditioned by "she".
  • "Elle cherche son chat/sa chatte": "son" agrees with "chat" and "sa" agrees with "chatte".
3/3/2018, 12:28:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ocxana

Why "son" chat and not "ton"? I am still working with the whole pronoun section. CX

3/22/2015, 1:52:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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"son" goes with "il/elle"

  • je - mon, ma, mes
  • tu - ton, ta, tes
  • il/elle/on - son, sa, ses
  • nous - notre, nos
  • vous - votre, vos
  • ils/elles - leur, leurs
3/22/2015, 9:59:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/EdgarDomasheu

ThankU.

5/29/2016, 4:47:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/elaidio

i got i t right and u are wrong

5/12/2016, 2:30:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Eliza89_0

But if the subject is her...why isnt it Elle cherche sa chat?

6/21/2015, 3:49:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
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whatever the subject's gender, possessive adjectives agree with the object owned:

il/elle cherche son chat / sa soeur / ses enfants

6/22/2015, 10:39:26 AM
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