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  5. "She is above me."

"She is above me."

Translation:Sie ist über mir.

December 25, 2017

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam-Robertson

Why is 'me' in the dative case and not in the accusative case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because her location is above me.

über mich would be for destination of movement -- but ist is not a movement verb.

Locations take the dative case when you use a two-way preposition such as über.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elderwanda

An example that comes to mind, since I've been listening to it frequently, , is Aschenputtel (Cinderella) saying a wish to a magic tree. She says:

"Bäumchen, rüttel dich und schüttel dich, wirf Gold und Silber über mich."

https://germanstories.vcu.edu/grimm/aschen.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PsychosidM

And also because she is above, therefore not moving but static which takes the dative case??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Derek656117

Wie Cleopatra.... oder Aphrodite


[deactivated user]

    Why not "auf"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Because she is not "on me" (touching me) but "above me" (higher than me and not touching me).


    [deactivated user]

      thx man ;)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdnanGaleeb

      Why not auf ? It seems this question was answered butvthe comment was deleted ...


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      I've undeleted the question now, so that you can see what the answer refers to.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanny-chan

      How would you say 'She's above me' in the figurative sense - e.g. above me in a ranking or hierarchy?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomMartin0

      I read somewhere that 'uber' always predicates the accusative. Am I wrong?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

      I read somewhere that 'uber' always predicates the accusative. Am I wrong?

      Yes.

      First: uber is not a word in German. It's über with ü. (Or if you can't type that letter, ueber.)

      Second: über belongs to the group of prepositions that can take either the dative or the accusative case

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