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"Ich lese ein Buch, sie liest eine Zeitung."

Translation:I am reading a book, she is reading a newspaper.

December 26, 2017

155 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snigglesnurf

I feel like I'm never going to understand when they are saying "THEY are reading." and "SHE is reading."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarjivSing

I think its easy .. Sie essen -> They and Sie isst is She Depends on which form of verb is following it. That's how I got the hang of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica652736

Hopefully everyone can read this, my boyfriend is German and taught me this trick when he saw I was learning this. When talking about yourself the word will end in e, so Ich lese. When you're talking directly to or about a person it ends with a t. So Er liest, sie leist, du leist, etc. When you're talking to or about multiple people it ends with an en so it would be Sie lesen, Wir lesen. I remember he said this doesn't apply to every verb though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jessica652736

Sorry for my typos!! Those should all be liest, not leist


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric765151

You are a godsend, Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaciLacsi

Thanks.. boy friend.. (o:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celaway

Thank you so much! I was stuck on how to determine sie (she) and (sie) they in the accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnaldo119180

I wrote this in my notebook. Thanks for sharing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LJeanetteS

Thank you, understood!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-_-wot-_-

How do i give you a lingot thank you so much you helped


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/filipinojalapeno

click the button under the comment that says give lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ashwini920320

Focus on the verb that comes after. All regular verbs have specific endings for each pronoun. Eg. Ich -e (lese), du -st (liest), er/sie/es -t (liest), wir -en (lesen), ihr -t (liest), sie(they) -en (lesen).

Knowing this helps with using the correct conjunction of verbs you dont know, as well as differentiating between she and they.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoYourDailyDuo

Do you mean conjugation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melanie92612

Same here! It has to do with the form of the word after it. We will get it eventually!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.SaraMoh1

You must know that in Germany THEY & SHE are written "SIE" when SIE meant she, it will be SIE LIEST or SIE IST ... When SIE meant thay, it will be SIE LESEN or SIE SIND


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ajay148416

Its very simple If u find 'en' at last of verb ...ex: sie lesen buch. ' they read book' And if Sie liest buch She reads book


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cole478

This question seems broken to me.

I first tried "I read a book and she reads a newspaper". Got counted wrong, maybe the simple present isn't acceptable here?"

Next, I tried "I'm reading a book and she's reading a newspaper" Got counted wrong again for using contractions?

I have to type EXACTLY what it wants me to in order to get it right, just seems weird.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Where you went wrong is that you put an "and" into your sentences.

The German does not have an und in it.

"I read a book, she reads a newspaper" and "I'm reading a book, she's reading a newspaper" are both accepted alternatives.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cole478

Oh! Oops. I can't believe I didn't see that. Have a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ken666078

I think Duo does this to trip us up. See if we are really paying attention.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiffany787725

Actually, I tried "I read a book, she reads a newspaper" and it got counted wrong (The correction underlined "read" and "reads" and suggested "am reading" and "is reading"
Now I am really confused about why I couldn't use simple present in this one. Can someone clarify me? thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Actually, I tried "I read a book, she reads a newspaper" and it got counted wrong

I'm not sure what might have happened -- "I read a book, she reads a newspaper" is one of the accepted sentences.

And unfortunately, the location of the underline is not always reliable.

Could you make a screenshot the next time this happens?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris103865

Duo might hsve interpreted it as past tense read.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Note in English, that’s an error. It’s a run-on sentence/comma splice. German allows that structure, however.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darklitera

Hm..why is not accepted second part "she reads"? Or it strictly have to be "she is reading"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

why is not accepted second part "she reads"?

The two parts are parallel, so they should have the same tense -- if you have "I am reading..." in the first part, it should be "she is reading..." in the second part, while if you have "I read..." in the first part, it should be "she reads..." in the second part.

What was your entire answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Well, if one says "I read..., she reads...", in English that means it's a habitual or routine action. "Every week at the laundromat, I read a book and she reads a newspaper." If we are talking about an action taking place now, or in the moment, we need to use present continuous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/utkrishtch

Yes this problem should be improved..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

What problem? There isn't anything wrong with the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sesmallor

Why it is not "einen buch"? Isn't "ein Buch" akkusativ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, ein Buch is accusative.

Only masculine nouns and pronouns have distinct accusative forms -- neuter and feminine words, as well as all plural ones, have an accusative form that is identical to their nominative form.

das Buch is neuter, and so its (indefinite) accusative ein Buch looks like its nominative ein Buch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vsaini603

Then why is it eine zietung and not ein zietung?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's neither of those; it's eine Zeitung (with capital Z and then ei) -- with eine because Zeitung is a feminine noun, not a neuter one like Buch.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebeccaAnd904227

What does neuter mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anthony480007

It means it's neither masculine nor feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robertron

In what situations do you need to have a conjunction between two independent clauses like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

Without having any further clarification on your question, I would say; when there is further information to be imparted by a conjunction.
Two examples spring to mind, and they translate quite nicely to English:

„Ich lese ein Buch und sie liest eine Zeitung.“
"I'm reading a book and she's reading a newspaper."

„Ich lese ein Buch, während sie eine Zeitung liest.“
"I'm reading a book whilst she reads a newspaper."

If that doesn't properly answer your question, would you mind rephrasing it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmalieB39

There's no option to report an error in the English translation of this sentence, so just noting it here: in English, there should be a semi-colon between the two main clauses, not a comma as is done in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aztend

Would it be correct to say "She reading the newspaper" despite it being eine? I rarely use "a" when talking about reading the newspaper, and I'm pretty sure that's true for others too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmalieB39

As far as I know (native English speaker), "eine" means "a" in English, never "the". If I didn't know what particular newspaper someone was reading, I'd generally say "She is [or she's] reading a newspaper" rather than "She is [or she's] reading the newspaper."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bobo_Duo1

Is there an easy way to remember the differences between liest, lesen, lese, or any other forms?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melanie92612

I don't think there is, unfortunately. I think like der die das den they just have to be memorized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/filipinojalapeno

if the subject is ich the verb ends in -e if its du the verb ends in -st if its er, sie as in she, es, or ihr the verb ends in -t if its wir or plural sie the verb ends in -en


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AthreyaKri1

What's the difference between lese and liest as used here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

They are both forms of the same verb -- like "am, is, are" in English.

You have to pick the form that matches the subject:

  • ich lese
  • du liest
  • er liest, sie liest, es liest
  • wir lesen
  • ihr lest
  • sie lesen

Just as you can't say "he am" or "you is" in English, so you cannot say ich liest or du lese in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ayta687772

What is the different between present tense and present continuous in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What is the different between present tense and present continuous in German?

There isn't one. German just has one present tense that roughly fulfils the same purpose as both simple present and present continuous in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RayRabil

Is it permissible in German to separate two independent clauses with a comma? In English it is a big no-no.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard705453

Why is it not eine before Buch, and why is it not ein before Zeitung? Can someone please advise? Danke.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The word Buch is neuter (so "the book" is das Buch), while the word Zeitung is feminine (so "the newspaper" is die Zeitung).

The gender of each noun is simply something you have to learn, memorise, and know. You usually can't tell the gender of a word just by looking at it.

The indefinite article ein is used before masculine and neuter nouns, the indefinite article eine before feminine nouns.

(To be more specific, ein is used before masculine nouns in the nominative case, e.g. when they are the subject of a verb. In the accusative case, e.g. when they are the object of a verb, it's einen. But neuter and feminine words articles look the same in nominative and accusative, so even when nouns are in the accusative case, as here, it'll be ein for neuter and eine for feminine.)

So since Buch is neuter, you get ein Buch, and since Zeitung is feminine, you get eine Zeitung.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ren8609

So, only if these two words were masculine would they change to the einen? Or den for 'the'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

So, only if these two words were masculine would they change to the einen? Or den for 'the'?

Yes.

(Well, if any of them were masculine, then that one would change to einen or den.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/highrj

Can magazine be used as a translation for Zeitung?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No. A magazine is eine Zeitschrift, not eine Zeitung.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HenryGriff11

I got translation: "I am reading a book, she is reading a gazette."

What is a gazette?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamdunk

It's an old-fashioned word in english for a newspaper or newsletter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Johnwilliam_1

why is 'sie' not represented as 'they' in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because we can see from the verb ending that it has to mean "she" in this sentence.

sie liest has a verb form ending in -t so it is "she is reading".

sie lesen has a verb form ending in -en so it is "they are reading".

Pay attention to the verb in order to tell apart "she" from "they".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaniaZaidi

I wrote " I read a book, she read a newspaper" for translation but it got marked wrong. But when I click on the word 'lese' or 'liest' it says 'read' under both. So why did it mark me wrong? Is there a way to know if the sentence is past present or future?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

liest can bei either from du liest (= you read) or er liest, sie liest (= he reads, she reads).

In either case, it is in the present tense.

Since the subject here is sie liest, the translation has to be "she reads".

So the entire sentence would be "I read a book, she reads a newspaper."

An alternative translation is "I am reading a book, she is reading a newspaper."

(German doesn't make a distinction between present simple for repeated or habitual actions on the one hand and present continuous for actions taking place right now on the other.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlung1

I don't know about German, but in high school, I was taught that it is incorrect to join two sentences with a comma.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That's true about English. German is a bit more permissive about using commas where English would use semicolons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snir_Sigawi

Why is "I read a book and she reads a newspaper" unacceptable?...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Because there is no German word that translates to "and" in the original.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avinashtanniru

Can any one help me when sie is considered as they or she. Hints also pls


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

When they are the subject: look at the verb.

sie "she" verb forms usually end in -t (in the present tense); sie "they" verb forms usually in -en.

For example, sie liest "she reads" versus sie lesen "they read".

When they are the object -- only context can make clear whether it is "her" or "them".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avinashtanniru

Thank you soo much mizinamo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yadwinder_gadari

Why the accusative case is not applied on this sentence ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It is.

ein Buch and eine Zeitung are both in the accusative case.

However, only masculine words have a distinct form in the accusative case -- feminine, neuter, and plural all look the same in nominative and accusative cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CARLOS112393

According to other exercises my answer is correct. "I READ A BOOK" is the same than "I AM READING A BOOK"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What was the entire text of your answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mostafaelmadany

this was my answer "i read a book , she read a newspaper " the answer way wrong why


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmalieB39

mizinamo gave a great explanation of why this is wrong, to DaniaZaidi, about 5 months ago. (Just look further up in the discussion on this sentence.) Does mizinamo's explanation answer your question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dan679335

Why ein buch. The eine zeitung. Is it mal vs. Female usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It's related to grammatical gender, not to natural gender or sex.

Buch "book" is grammatically neuter, Zeitung "newspaper" is grammatically feminine, Artikel "article" is grammatically masculine, for example.

So it would be Ich lese ein Buch und eine Zeitung und einen Artikel -- the form of ein- depends on the grammatical gender of the following noun.

Note that all nouns are capitalised in German. There is no word zeitung in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrajwalSagar

What is the difference between einen ein and eine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/filipinojalapeno

einen=masculine eine=feminine ein=neuter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdisHadzic

I ansver riht.. but you say no


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What was your answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/korben5856

I basically translated the same thing, and just a note i wish they could explain the difference between "SHE is reading" and "THEY are reading"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmalieB39

The word "sie" itself, with no other context, can't tell you if "she" or "they" is meant. But the verb ending does.

In the present tense, if the verb ends in -t: "sie" = "she" - so "sie liest" = "SHE is reading". If the verb ends in -en: "sie" = "they" - so "sie lesen" = "THEY are reading".

And there is also formal "Sie" referring to "you" (either singular or plural); the verb ending for that is also -en.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harytomi

What is the problem I read a book she reads a newspaper


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Looks like a valid translation to me. What was the exact, entire error message? Can you show me a screenshot, please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikeyaa

Had a problem like others regarding the translation to English. I used the present instead. Duolingo should specify in brackets which tense to use if they want to be so specific. Ich lese is present so shouldn't be marked as wrong if you don't give context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

What was your entire answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KPQqN0

Lese can be either read or reading no? In fact there is no present tense -ing of verbs, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Modupeola6

I don't seem to totally understand the use of ein and eine before nouns. I understand that for "ein Junge" and "eine Frau" , Junge and Frau are clearly masculine and feminine... But how does one determine this for objects? Why is it not ein Zeitung or eine Büch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

how does one determine this for objects?

You look it up in the dictionary.

Grammatical gender is essentially arbitrary, and even different languages that have gender don't agree on the same gender -- for a German, der Tisch is clearly masculine while for a Frenchman, la table is just as clearly feminine.

It's just something you have to memorise. Like irregular verbs in English or something. ("Why do we say I live now and I lived yesterday but not I give now and I gived yesterday?")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dddunham

Why is "I read a book, she reads a newspaper." not valid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carmen128231

It does not say it is gerundium, you can say both


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChanBan2

a book = ein buch; a newspaper = eine zeitung; why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

a book = ein buch

No. a book = ein Buch with capital B. The capitalisation is part of the spelling.

a newspaper = eine zeitung

eine Zeitung, capital Z.

why?

No reason. Grammatical gender is arbitrary. Just something you have to learn and memorise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChanBan2

Well..I get the capitalization part. Next does it mean that the newspaper is feminine? and also the kind of flags u are having alongside ur name..does it mean you know all these languages..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

does it mean that the newspaper is feminine?

That's right.

das Buch is neuter, die Zeitung is feminine.

the kind of flags u are having alongside ur name..does it mean you know all these languages..?

No; it just means that I've taken the courses on Duolingo ... for different lengths of time. Some only for a day, some only for a week. So I'm not equally good at all of those languages. And some languages I took four years ago and have mostly forgotten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngiePea6

How could I identify you are talking in present or present continuous? It seems to write by the same way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

How could I identify you are talking in present or present continuous? It seems to write by the same way.

Yes, German does not make this distinction, so either translation will usually be accepted unless there is some time marker (e.g. "right now" or "every day") that forces one particular tense in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RavirajBha6

How to know when is it read and when is it reading


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/filipinojalapeno

"I read" and "I'm reading" both translate to "Ich lese"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Subodh511479

Why translation "I read a book and she read a newspaper" is incorrect as per Duo only "I am reading a book and she is reading a newspaper" is correct?

Technically both are correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why translation "I read a book and she read a newspaper" is incorrect as per Duo only "I am reading a book and she is reading a newspaper" is correct?

Technically both are correct.

No; neither are correct, because there is no und in the German sentence you are being asked to translate.

Also, "she read" is not correct English; it would have to be "she reads".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bookworm3375

When are you supposed to use ein and eine? I don't get it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Use ein with masculine and neuter nouns; use eine with feminine nouns.

(If you’re in level 10, you would have seen that in the first four or five skills in the tree, so to get more clear on genders and articles you might want to go back and review from the beginning— I know this is covered earlier).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimStone8

I typed "I am reading a book, and she is reading a newspaper." Why is that wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I typed "I am reading a book, and she is reading a newspaper." Why is that wrong?

You added a word "and" which does not translate any part of the German you were asked to translate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrija113

Why can't it be i read a books, she reads a newspaper?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Why can't it be i read a books

"a books" is not correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ajay148416

I wrote 'I read a book , she reads a newspaper' Why this is shown wrong by duo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rajko253758

Ich lese / i read Ich lese/ i am reading What is the difference wtfffff


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

There is no difference. German has one present tense (Present simple) while English has two: present simple and present continuous.

To know which way to translate the German sentence, you need to decide when the action occurs. If it happens usually, regularly, or habitually, use present tense (I read the news every day); if it seems to be something that is going on “now”, or in the present moment of speaking, use present continuous (I am reading a magazine).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

sie liest is present tense, but "she read" (pronounced "she red") is past tense -- so your sentence is not a correct translation.

It should be "she reads" with -s (pronounced "she reeds") in the present tense.

Lingot to you for providing a screenshot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vishnuprakashr

Thanks a bunch..i was wondering the same..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaliyari

you can translte it to "I read a book, she reads a newspaper" note: "s" need for "read" in "she read"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieBarbara1

I don't see any reason why "I read a book, she read a newspaper" isn't correct. I'm a native English speaker. In English there is a slightly different meaning between "reads" and "is reading", but I believe the two are written the same in German. In English, "is reading" implies that she is doing it now, whereas "reads" implies that reading is something she does, no time factor implicated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Because this sentence is in the present, not the past. You have to say either “she reads..”, or “she is reading...”. ‘She read a newspaper’ isn’t possible as a translation for sie liest eine Zeitung.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrDoktor20

'I read a book, she reads a newspaper' is equally valid yet it gets a red cross. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

'I read a book, she reads a newspaper' is equally valid yet it gets a red cross. Why?

I don't know -- that should be accepted.

If you have a screenshot of that sentence being rejected, please upload it to a website somewhere (e.g. imgur) and tell us the URL.

Then perhaps someone can figure out what went wrong for you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerrDoktor20

I thought that I had posted a correction to my original, but it seems to have disappeared into cyberspace. It wasn't my use of 'read' as opposed to 'am reading' which was incorrect. It was that I had misread 'sie' as 'du' - same verb ending - and therefore translated the incorrect pronoun in my answer. Entschuldigung vielmals!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yarelitellez

How to know the difference, how do I know what is duoling taking for correct or I correct, when it uses both ways????? Ich lese > I read Ich lese > I am reading


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Both are possible. German doesn't make that distinction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mehmetbagli

Why in this context buch isn't akkusativ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Buch is accusative in this sentence— but neuter and feminine nouns (das Buch, die Zeitung) don’t change their forms in accusative case. Only masculine nouns’ articles change to den/einen in accusative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danklim109

"She reads" and "she is reading" are exactly the same thing...add the first as a acceptable input.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"She reads" and "she is reading" are exactly the same thing...add the first as a acceptable input.

"I am reading a book, she is reading a newspaper" and "I read a book, she reads a newspaper" are already both accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fironex

How do you tell past from present tense? I just said 'read' instead of 'am reading'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

How do you tell past from present tense?

ich lese is present tense; the past tense would have been ich habe gelesen or (more bookishly), ich las.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yana346602

I made this sentence three times and I was right BUT app always says that I am wrong and as a result I lose all my hearts...wth


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

app always says that I am wrong

Then you were probably wrong.

If you would like help finding your mistake, please post your screenshot to a website somewhere (e.g. imgur) and tell us the URL.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valvalvoom

My answer was: I read a book and she reads the newspaper. This should be accepted as correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/filipinojalapeno

the original sentence didn't have und do you shouldn't put and


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShambhaviB10

How to know that 'sie' means she or they ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dlung1

By the ver. She reads sie liest, they read, sie lesen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HwKoay

I am confused, can't I use either "I read" or "I am reading" for Ich lese, as well as for "You read" or "You are reading" to Du lest, as well as She reads and She is reading to Sie liest?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

can't I use either "I read" or "I am reading" for Ich lese, as well as for "You read" or "You are reading" to Du lest, as well as She reads and She is reading to Sie liest?

Yes, if the resulting sentence makes sense in English. (Note that it's du liest with ie.)

For example, "I read a book, she reads a newspaper." and "I am reading a book, she is reading a newspaper." are both reasonable translations for Ich lese ein Buch, sie liest eine Zeitung.

But "I read a book, she is reading a newspaper" and "I am reading a book, she reads a newspaper" are not natural things to say -- why would you change tense in the middle of the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rish.love

Hey what is this i'll never understand where they use least ,lissen ,trinkst,trinken....and somewhere thei ihr means you and somewhere it means i am


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

somewhere thei ihr means you and somewhere it means i am

ihr means "you" (when talking to several people)

ich means "I".

33% of the letters are different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra866514

I understand that, in German a verb can translate as, I read or I am reading. Some answers give the alternative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter20394

How do you know if Sie means you, she, or they? What is the trick and why don't the Germans invent a couple of new words to clarify this ambiguity?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

How do you know if Sie means you, she, or they?

In the middle of a sentence, capitalised Sie can only mean "you", while lowercase sie can only mean "she, her, they, them". It's only when sie is the first word of a sentence that it looks like Sie.

As the subject of a verb, you can tell the difference by the verb ending; please see the other comments on this page, where this has been explained several times.

why don't the Germans invent a couple of new words to clarify this ambiguity?

Because it's not considered a problem by native speakers.

(Why don't the English invent a couple of new words to clarify whether "you" means du or dich or ihr or euch? Sure, some have a separate plural form but nobody ever bothered to distinguish subject from object forms?)


[deactivated user]

    It sounds like a robot talking, its un-understandable


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustALittleEdgy

    I am so used to Swedish I accidentally put "Leser" which is like some weird Hybrid between "Läser" and "Lese"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ridhima547689

    Why is it 'ein' for book but 'eine' for zietung ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sneya2

    Why can't we use "sie lesen" instead of "sie liest" ? Please help


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Why can't we use "sie lesen" instead of "sie liest" ?

    Because those mean different things.

    sie lesen = they read

    sie liest = she reads


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia353095

    or correctly in English for present tense, I read a book, she reads a newspaper -


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vee762345

    The "sie" is not capitalized so it should be they correct? If they intend it to be "she" they should have made it Sie


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    The "sie" is not capitalized so it should be they correct?

    No. The verb liest ends in -t, not in -en, and so sie liest can only mean "she reads".

    "They read" would be sie lesen with a verb form ending in -en.

    If they intend it to be "she" they should have made it Sie

    No. "she" and "they" are both lowercase sie.

    Uppercase Sie is the formal "you".

    (At the beginning of a sentence, you can't tell the difference, of course.)

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