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  5. "Ani po měsíci jsem se tam ne…

"Ani po měsíci jsem se tam nevrátil."

Translation:I did not return there even after a month.

December 26, 2017

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/celyn3

Is it ok to say "I did not even return there after a month"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

As a native AmE speaker, I feel a difference in meaning between "did not return even" (Duo translation) and "did not even return" (your suggested alternative). To me, the Duo version puts more emphasis on the time frame, while the alternative word order emphasizes the "returning" more. So I'd defer to the Czech experts on whether your alternative could be accepted, based on what the word order in the original sentence suggests... which looks to me like "even after a month."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renardo_11

Good point, and the fact that “ani” stands before “po měsíci” and not before “nevrátil” is in favour of the proposed translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephAKr

I think your answers are perfect. So my question is: how can i know that 'even' comes before or after return, but as Renardo mentioned, the 'ani' is in the before 'po měsíci' which makes it lean to 'even AFTER A MONTH'.

Generally, Czech sentences are really constructed unnecessarily weird :):):)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoneheadBass

If it is of any value at this point, "did not even return" is not accepted. In this exercise, it is pretty clear that "even" should come before "a month" in the English sentence, because ani comes before po měsíci in the Czech sentence. Sometimes we get lucky with word order! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renardo_11

Děkuji mnohokrát!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Renardo_11

In my opinion “ani” is not placed before or after “return;” it usually refers to the expression following it. So a better way to express the question is:

  • is “ani” to be placed before “nevrátil” (did not return) or before “po měsíci” (after a month)?

In the Czech sentence the second version is used, and it seems far more common to me. (It would be interesting to know what celyn3 wants to express with her/his English translation.) Let's try to compare it with the alternative:

  • Ani po měsíci jsem se tam nevrátil. – The Czech translation exercise. Literal translation: “Even after a month I did not there return” (yes, wrong word order in English; I said “literal”).
  • Po měsíci jsem se tam ani nevrátil – I cannot say whether this is even proper Czech but it seems closer to celyn3's proposal: Literally it means “After a month I did not there even return” (after a month I did not even return there).

So in the first case it's “even after a month” since “ani” stands before “po měsíci”. In the second case it's “not … even return,” since “ani” stands before “nevrátil.” My interpretations are the following:

(1) I hated this place so much that I did not want to return there even after waiting a month. (But maybe after a year I will?)

(2) I hated this place so much that after a month I did not even want to return there, much less live there. (But I was able to think about it.) It doesn't sound quite usual, and I can only hope it's what celyn3 wanted to express with her/his translation.

All this goes with the reserve that my second Czech sentence is proper Czech, which I cannot guarantee at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephAKr

Thank you for your long and comprehensive text, I agree with you as far as my brain manage to get around this explanation.. :) Still, I think I get why it is as it is..

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