"Les enfants que nous avons eus sont grands."

Translation:The children that we have had are grown-up.

March 17, 2013

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xgraxe

I am a little peeved that it expects you to choose "The boys that we had are grown-up" in addition to "The children..." as correct answers. If you wanted to say "the boys" you would say "les garçons" and be explicit about it.

March 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

I got a multiple-choice question where I was supposed to check "The girls that we had..." as well. I only checked "children" and lost a heart.

April 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quiche84

Same here. And I totally agree that the only correct translation would have been "children"!

May 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

When "enfant(s)" is used without any hint as to their being boys or girls or a mix, it is assumed that the masculine gender will be used.

March 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

If there were only girls, would it be: enfantes?

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sldlansing

At some point those multiple choice questions went from the easiest ones to feeling like a mine field where you never know what they're going to count. Doubly so when they start using the imperfect.

February 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmytroShkr

Well, it's a bit strange to see that someone's children should be referred to as somebody "we had", as if they were déjà morts or does anyone really believe that a person whose child has come of age has no child anymore? Like, 'Do you have any children, Mr Benson? - No, officer, my son George is already twenty-two.'

July 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Hence the use of present perfect?

(I think George Benson was born in the 40ies)

July 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DmytroShkr

Oh G Benson's podcast is in my ears... No, I actually referred to a Mr Benson from the English Streamline course. And my lament goes to the other option, i.e. 'The children we had [...]'. Now, more generally, I find the whole English sentence suffering from some redundancy syndrome: why do we really have to say so about our children? Would it not suffice, in a day-to-day idiom, to call them just that, our children?! Otherwise, it sounds to me rather biblical: He hath known her and she hath had a child by him ))) Note that the car we've had is now out of whack is perceived differently.

July 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sherm456

Even "The children that we've had" sounds "off". I would say "Our children are now grown." In English (not sure about French) you can always be your parents' "child", no matter how old you are.

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

In some (far fetched) scenario where a family would have adopted children on top of their own children, such a sentence would probably make sense, to differentiate them (?)

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sherm456

"Our biological children" would be a common way to put it.

October 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jlseymour3

Or not so far fetched (in the US anyway), a couple each (or even only one) has children from previous marriages, and then have more children together.

April 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamLGRing

"The children that we have had are grown-ups"
Duolingo also accepted this and the final "s" was not a typo.
That would change "grown-up" from an adjective to a plural noun: "grown-ups". Can the French sentence mean both? Thanks in advance, @Sitesurf :)

March 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

for "grands" to become a noun, it would need an article: les enfants que nous avons eus sont des grands.

but you can use the noun "adultes" with the same meaning: les enfants que nous avons eus sont (des) adultes.

March 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamLGRing

Thanks, Sitesurf. That means, "The children that we have had are grown-ups" should no longer be accepted as a correct answer (whereas "grown-up" is correct). I will put in a report if I ever get it again.

March 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yalkhder

Can someone confirm if it is "nous avons eus" or "nous avons eu"? Google translate says it's the 2nd sentence.

July 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

It is "les enfants que nous avons eus". Check here: http://www.duolingo.com/comment/38735

July 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yalkhder

Thank you. Makes sense now.

July 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceZhu792

But girls are "filles" not enfants!

December 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

If girls are "filles" and not "enfants", then boys are "garcons" and not "enfants" either.

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Agreed and fixed, thanks.

October 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frogarms

Our children are grown up - as a native speaker would actually say - not accepted. Obviously not literal enough. I wish DL would make up its mind as to when literal is definitely required as it seems to chop and change all the time.

December 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

This sentence is not explicitly about "our children" but about "the children that we have had", which is different. If you think about teachers, educators, doctors/nurses, or even adoptive parents, etc. this sentence would make more sense.

December 31, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isenhatesyou

Is there a reason duolingo steadfastly refuses to accept "which" as a translation for the relative pronoun? I was under the impression that "que" could mean either.

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I haven't found a good reason (yet). However, indeed as a relative pronoun, "que" can translate "that" or "which".

Note that "ce que" is only "which".

January 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuzanaLagova

Why cannot "que" be translated as "who" when not in nominative ?

November 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Strictly speaking, since "who" has an object form "whom", you should use it.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuzanaLagova

O.K., then "whom", not only "that"? Thanks a lot.

November 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

You can also use "that" and even "which" or drop the relative pronoun completely: "the children we have had..."

November 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whygeorgia

" the children that we have had were tall" should be the correct answer, in order to make grammatical sense in english ....

March 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

You can keep "are tall" in present if you are talking about their current situation vs their past situation:

the children we have had are tall now.

March 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pret813

Sorry Sitesurf, but you can't refer to a group of mixed-gender infants using the masculine gender. That is not allowed in English. You can use the pronouns "them" or "they," or you can use another generic word like "kids" or "children." If an acceptable translation uses "boys" in place of infants (though it shouldn't), then "girls" must be accepted also. We are apt to use man/he generically when we are referring to mankind.

April 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Is not The children who(m) we had are grown-up a better translation?

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schergjd

possibly, but in America we would just say "Our children are grown-up". This sentence sounds artificially formal in English the way duo has it translated. Does anyone know if this is also very formal in French?

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Thanks. I am wondering why there are so many artificial sentences on DL. Does a computer or a man create them?

October 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Human beings create sentences, in every course. They work in teams (natives from both languages) to adjust translations. It is not an easy task because lessons are about grammar, syntax, conjugations, idioms, various registers of language and vocabulary is scarce, particularly in early lessons.

October 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konrad-Michal

Thank you for clarification, but sometimes it is not an easy task to guess a context, in which a given sentence could be used, either...

October 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JDK1000

It shows "The children we'd have grown-up." as a correct option. How can the children that we would have had be grown-up, or even born for that matter? This is a horrible translation an unnatural in English. DL should probably scrap this sentence and start over.

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I don't know where you say the children we'd have grown-up as a correct translation, because it is not, and therefore it is not in the system. And in the system, contractions are not used.

There is no room for "would" here anyway, since the French sentence is in indicative compound past, but "the children we had have grown-up" is a correct solution.

February 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JDK1000

Sitesurf, thanks for the reply. I agree, it doesn't make sense. - But it is definitely in the system. After I got the answer wrong. It displayed 2 possible translations. The 1st one was "The children we'd have grown-up." (with contraction) and the 2nd one read "The children that we have had are grown-up." I cut & pasted the translation from the screen to make sure I got it right.

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Hmmm, I have to inquire, then... Thanks!

February 23, 2015
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.