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"My grandpa doesn't have hair."

Translation:我爷爷没有头发。

January 2, 2018

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexLamb2

Why wo and not "wo de"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiendComedian

I believe when saying "my [family member]" you don't have to use the possesive 的。 In fact I think you usually leave it out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulTroberg

Both are ok, the 的 can be dropped if it is understood by the context that it is a possessive. Report if it doesn't accept 我的


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erikku15

You can ommit the 的 in many circumstances.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ParkJinhyeok

Since there are somewhat "close relationship" between 我 and 爷爷, people usually don't use "的" between them. Likewise, they just say 我妈妈. If you use 的, it becomes highlighting, like "MY" grandpa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkWootton

It is often neglected for close family


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nich227

When talking about relatives, its not necessary to use the possesive 的. You can, but its adding an extra particle that you dont really need. For example, could say 我的妹妹 but its really easier to say 我妹妹


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muanui

When you talk about your family, it doesn't need "de". For example, Wo de mama and wo mama, they are the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saintlysword

Because they are very close (emotionally) to the speaker. Dropping the "de" like that is usually reserved for family relationships.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Indy294970

Wo de = wo in this circumstance... They cut it short


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabrielle145359

Because it's a family member.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MyNameSteve

Report it. I did too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricMartel8

I have the same question. Typo error


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George792719

Has anyone noticed that in the sections where you get to find the names of the characters on display that there are some character-words that are a bit weird for this lesson that I don't think we have had before? I've been making a list of them:

锅 = guō = pot / pan / boiler 笼 = lóng = basket / cage 粥 = zhōu = congee / gruel / porridge 拉 = lā = to pull / to play (a bowed instrument) / to drag / to draw

Strange, I wonder why they put those there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Those are all relatively common food or cooking words, either in their own right or in the right compounds. Not sure what section we're in currently in though.

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