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"This provincial tycoon only buys expensive stuff."

Translation:这个土豪只买贵的东西。

January 3, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlubberBub

Provincial tycoon really isn't a good translation. Pleco suggest nouveau riche, that sounds more like it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kal-in

I doubt there really is a 100% fitting word, but noveau riche or young money would fit a lot better than this I'd agree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/knoedelfri

What exactly is a provincial tycoon?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephanusG1

A 土豪 is the kind of person who has got rich quickly and flaunts his wealth by driving supercars, taking shots of cognac, wearing lots of gold and generally showing off what a classless and tasteless peasant in a palace he is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelle.ko

Why isn't 贵东西 accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Winston298006

My guess is the two-character rule. 贵客 and 贵宾 are words on their own, but otherwise you would normally need 的 between the adjective and noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drigoro2000

Why is this considered slang?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillowsofXihu

土豪 is slang and a relatively new term, also a derogatory one. "土" here denotes a similar meaning and feel to "country bumpkin" or "coarse/uncouth/unrefined" in English, while "豪" references extravagance. Put together, it has a similar connotation as noveau-riche. Duolingo using "stuff" to translate "东西" helps to convey the casual and somewhat-critical tone of the original Chinese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxMorris19

I was coming her to say the same. It's a derogatory term for a peasant that's become rich.

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