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  5. "There are five pharmacies."

"There are five pharmacies."

Translation:Es gibt fünf Apotheken.

January 4, 2018

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timah78

Why is it es gibt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abendbrot

"there is" and "there are" are fix phrases for "es gibt". "es gibt" means "there is/are", "it exists", "there is offered"(=es wird angeboten) and "it is available"(=es ist verfügbar).

Literal "there is" is "dort ist". For example: Dort ist ein Haus. or Dort sind fünf Apotheken.

In other situations it sounds off to say: Es sind Tomaten im Supermarkt. We would say: Es gibt Tomaten im Supermarkt. or Im Supermarkt gibt es Tomaten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sleepyicebear

I answered "Dort sind fünf Apotheken". Why is it marked wrong? Is it because it didn't fit the context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That would mean "There are five pharmacies there."

But that's not what the English sentence says -- it only claims the existence of five pharmacies (with "there are"), but does not say where they exist, i.e. whether they are "here" or "there" or somewhere else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah0741

what is it in 'dort sind funf apotheken' thats saying they are there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

dort means "(over) there".

Also, it's fünf, not funf. (Or if you can't type the ü, then fuenf.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yetanother1

Es gibt is there are or there is


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraMye10

Yes, it means "there is " AND "there are"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dcounts

Okay, Duo, I hovered over "Apotheke" for the plural and it said "Apotheke (plural)". Got dinged. I'll probably remember now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeJeal

Me too. I put "Apotheken" and then in moving the cursor went over the hint which said "Apotheke (plural), so I changed it. Why does the hint say what it does? It isn't 1st April yet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

Is this not an applicable situation to use „Es sind fünf Apotheken.“ or is this just a missing translation?
I've reported it in case it is the latter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Es sind fünf Apotheken., by itself, would mean "They are five pharmacies" rather than "There are five pharmacies."

The "there are" meaning would only apply for me if there is a location specified, e.g. Es sind fünf Apotheken in dieser Stadt "There are five pharmacies in this town".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

Danke, Mizi. Habs jetzt kapiert :)

Nun, da ich ein bisschen darüber nachgedacht habe, gilt hier dieselbe Grammatik wie „Ich bin's“, oder?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minni_Mii

"Da sind 5 Apotheken " why is it wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Firstly, because that means "There are five pharmacies there", but the English sentence only has "There are five pharmacies" -- it does not say where those pharmacies are, whether "there" (da) or here or somewhere else.

Secondly, because you wrote the number 5 in digits. That doesn't show that you know the number in German. Numbers in the target language are expected to be written out as words, so that Duolingo knows that you know it's not Es gibt cinco Apotheken or Es gibt five Apotheken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul130585

On another post, I remember seeing 'es gibt' explained as equivalent to the French 'il y a', which I found helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zoomie72

If you hover over "pharmacies" the pop up solution says Apotheke (plural)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NormanBuss1

I put "Apotheken" for the plural but when I moved the cursor over the hint it said "Apotheke (plual), and was marked incorrect. I then went to the follow discussion page and found that three of the 10 comments did the same. Two of the three asked why but have had no answer. So I am now asking and am hoping for a reply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I don't know how that hint got there, but I agree that it's not very helpful. I've replaced it with Apotheken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SharonNaor

can't it also be: Da sind fünf Apotheken, as in: over there in front of us?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

As a native British English speaker I find it hard to imagine saying "There are five pharmacies" where "there" is a locative indicator rather than a part of the set phrase "there is/are" (which, at least in the UK, seems to be turning more and more into just "there is", but I'm digressing here) used to indicate general presence or existence.

If I wanted to add the aspect of "over there in front of us" I would either add an additional "there" or some other locative adverb/adverbial phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SharonNaor

Ok, so if I see "there is/ are" it has to be "eg gibt" as a general existing, and if I want a specific location then I need two "there" or something else that would emphasize I'm talking about a specific location?

I think you just helped me solved what was a great enigma for me.. Thanks (with a lingot)!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

Well, I'm very glad if I could help at all, and that's a pretty good rule of thumb, that will very rarely lead you astray.

I just felt compelled to clear up a possible issue down the line with the following statement:

...if I see "there is/ [sic] are" it has to be "eg [sic] gibt" as a general existing

Often, but not always. To slightly modify a sentence used by mizinamo on this thread, you could say:

Es sind fünf Apotheken auf dieser Straße.

To mean:

There are five pharmacies on this street.

But without the locative phrase "auf dieser Straße" "es sind" would cease to mean "there are".
Obviously in this scenario you are more than welcome to also use "es gibt", but it doesn't have to be "es gibt".

Another example from another thread:

Es fehlen keine Eier.

There are no eggs missing.

Here you'd have to be a bit more fancy using "es gibt" -- it would need to look something like this:

Es gibt keine Eier, die fehlen.

[Lit.]

There are no eggs, that are missing.

So, yes, "es gibt" is used to convey general existence (and rather often), but it doesn't have to be used when conveying general existence.


Edit

Fixed incorrect translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dizz

I did Es sind and was marked wrong. Could someone please tell me why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

In the exact words of mizinamo on this very thread (in response to my own question as fate would have it :P):

Es sind fünf Apotheken., by itself, would mean "They are five pharmacies" rather than "There are five pharmacies."

The "there are" meaning would only apply for me if there is a location specified, e.g. Es sind fünf Apotheken in dieser Stadt "There are five pharmacies in this town".

I would always recommend reading through the comments before posting a question; the answer may be there waiting for you :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/justin981104

'Es gibt' and 'Es sind' are interchangeable, no? Why is this marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

'Es gibt' and 'Es sind' are interchangeable, no?

No.

Only es gibt can be used to indicate existence without specifying a location.

es ist / es sind can be used to indicate the existence of something at a specific location.

es gibt is usually used for more permanent existence in a particular location, while ist/sind is usually for more temporary existence.

For example, Es gibt eine Katze auf dem Tisch would sound odd unless the cat is permanently installed there (perhaps it's a stone statue?), while similarly, Es sind drei Berge hinter dem Haus sounds odd since it sounds a bit as if they suddenly appeared there yesterday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1m.subo

I answered "es gibt fünf" by accident and it was right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I answered "es gibt fünf" by accident and it was right

Yes. This is a mistake made by the person who added this sentence.

I'm not sure how to report it to them since I don't think the current maintainers read the sentence discussions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Joy

I love 'es gibt'. It is one of those little gifts found in languages, like aller in French!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krstina17

I would "there are" translate as "dort gibt es"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

No -- "dort gibt es" would translate to "there are ... there".

For example, "Ich kenne einen schönen Campingplatz. Dort gibt es mehrere kleine Seen." (I know a beautiful campsite. There are many small lakes there.)

The "es gibt" translates to "there are" and the "dort" translates to "there".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/achemerysov

But why is "Da sind fünf Apotheken" not possible? Is it the same reason why "Es sind..." isn't possible?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamKean

Have you seen mizinamo's answer to your question?

If you have and still have further queries I would recommend replying to that comment and being more specific with your request, otherwise you're likely to receive the same answer.

If you haven't seen that mizinamo has already answered this question (in reply to Minni_Mii and ShiminHo who used "dort" in place of "da"), I would recommend reading through the comments more thoroughly before posting a question to save time in future, in case your question has already been answered.

In case you haven't seen either of mizinamo's comments in response to your question, here's the first one which is encapsulated in the second:

That would mean "There are five pharmacies there."

But that's not what the English sentence says -- it only claims the existence of five pharmacies (with "there are"), but does not say where they exist, i.e. whether they are "here" or "there" or somewhere else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aptrug

„Es sind fünf Apotheken“ should be accepted, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

„Es sind fünf Apotheken“ should be accepted, isn't it?

No, it shouldn't. That would mean "They are five pharmacies."

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