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"I am coming with you to the Rhine."

Translation:Ich komme mit dir zum Rhein.

January 4, 2018

94 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eoghan842360

Why doesn't "nach dem Rhein" work? Is nach only for more specific places like cities?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

Indeed. 'Nach' is commonly used for geographical destinations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

Only for countries and cities. It is not used for mountains, rivers etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yugo4k

I had no idea Rhein was a word related to rivers... I don't think the previous lessons used this word at all. Before coming to read the discussion, I was guessing it was the name of a city.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

"Rhein" is the name of the biggest river in Germany. In English it is called "Rhine".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSavageIII

But the Rhine is a geographical destination...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sakurasobakasu

nach would be used for a city or country, rather than to visit an object or thing such as river, museum etc. Except Hause!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IsaacYiff2003

The best way I've found of remembering that it's 'Zum' is the German folk-song 'Die Wacht am Rhein': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zikcHnimsxk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George44577

I'd also love to know this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QED-hamza-QED

Nach is used with home or home country

Er kommt nach dem land Er kommt nach hause


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlakem

Why is " ich gehe mit dir zum Rhein" wrong? I think it is correct and says the same thing anyhow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaceNalbone

I think gehe would closer mean "going with" vs "coming with"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Treacle18

I still het get confused about bei vs mit. I thought mit was used only for a close relationship and bei would be better when accompanying someone. Why not bei?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ianbartley

Same here. Why mit not bei? I thought mit related to activity and bei to place?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

You are right "mit" is used for activites and "ich komme" is an activity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatherTM

I want to know this too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Azure89

As mentioned earlier, both "mit" and "bei" can be translated to "with", but in different context. You use "mit" when you are doing doing an activity with someone and "bei" when you are with someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeGOgletree

My question is similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick705549

"gehe" would also be totally fine. It would mean something like 'we are going together'.

"Ich komme mit dir" implies that it's previously known that the other person is going and you are like "wait for me, i'm coming with you!" or "ok, i will join you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesleyMarie14

Did not accept "gehe"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillJim

Why "zum Rhein" [dative] rather than "zu den Rhein" [accusative]?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George44577

zu always takes dative - https://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/zu

Why zu always takes dative, though, I don't know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chocolateska

"zu" is a preposition that signals the beginning of what is referred to as an "adverbial phrase". The noun object that comes after "zu" is not an object of any verb; it's an object of "zu" itself, and is thus indirect. Google "adverbial phrase" if you'd like a lesson on the structure in English. It applies similarly to German, you just have to remember which prepositions start one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielPere406044

Why is it dir and not dich?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George44577

dir is dative; dich is accusative (and to complete the trio: du ist nominative). mit is always followed by dative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatherTM

I want to know why mit and not bei here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew48

I think it's the difference between "beside" or "together in a given location" (bei) and "accompanied by" (with).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marijuslau

Hi, recently in this module in one of the comment sections I found an explanation that "to be with someone" is either bei or mit ... zusammen

I tried: "Ich komme mit dir zusammen zum Rhein." and it didn't work. So is the zusammen required or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

That's a different case. The two examples work for "to be with someone". If you have a different verb that describes an action (like "to come" in this case), you just say "mit dir" to indicate that you do this action togeteher. No "bei" and no "zusammen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charles969992

Can I say "Ich komme zum Rhein mit dir"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketzal681041

You can, but it's unusal and more poetically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopSixSquish

Why was I swimming 'zu Deutschland nach Österreich' but I'm coming 'mit dir zum Rhein'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

When deniting dierections you use "nach" for countries and cities (and home), but "zu" for buildings, rivers and other locations..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariangelaCC

How do you know that Rhein is a masculine noun? Are most rivers masculine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

No. There are some that are masculine and some that are feminine. You have to learn the gender just like for any other noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian207379

Why not ich komme mit Sie zum Rhein?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

Ich komme mit dir zum Rhein - informal

Ich komme mit Ihnen zum Rhein - formal

Ich komme mit Sie zum Rhein - incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

you need a dative after "mit". The dative of "Sie" is "Ihnen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenG2016

Can one say, "Ich komme dir zum Rhein mit," on the grounds that mitkommen is a separable verb? Konnen Sie bitte erklaren? Vielen dank!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

The separable verb "mitkommen" does indeed exist, but it is not used here. The "mit" is a preposition connected to "dir". You can't separate the two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenG2016

Thank you for the clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheila351374

I wrote "du" instead of "dir" and was marked as wrong. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/relox84

Du is the subject form and you cannot use it after a preposition. That would be like saying "with I" or "with he" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sheila351374

I still don't understand this but thank you for your reply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

I - me -- ich - dir/dich
you - you -- du - dir/dich
he - him -- er - ihm/ihn
she - her -- sie - ihr/sie
it - it -- es -- ihm/es
we - us -- wir - uns
you - you -- ihr - euch
they - them -- sie - ihnen/sie
you - you -- Sie - Ihnen/Sie

It's not the fault of German that English puts so many different meanings in the word "you" and does not differentiate between subject and object case, as it does for most of the other pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mshell09

Isn't "mitkommen" a valid seperable verb? I said "Ich komme dir zum Rhein mit" and I got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

The separable verb "mitkommen" exists indeed, but it cannnot have an object or the like. So "Ich komme mit" means something like "I come along". When all the others go to the Rhine, you can say "Ich komme zum Rhein mit", when you want to participate.

But here you don't use "mitkommen", but simply "kommen", and the "mit" is a preposition that belongs to "dir". "mit dir" = "with you". And, like in English, prepositions directly precede the word they refer to. So you can't separate "mit" and "dir".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudyWatson8

Ignoring the fact that I misspelt Rhein, what is wrong with mit euch instead of mit dir? How can I know whether 'you' is plural or singular?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

You can't. That's why "dir", "euch" and "Ihnen" are all accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Petrus_Leite

Is "zum Rhein komme ich mit dir" right too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

Well, it is grammatically correct, but you would not use this word order except for e.g. in a poem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShrikantGa20051

what is mean if rhine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

The Rhine" (original German name "Rhein") is a big river in Germany.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/muraraka

if its the elbe, spree or danube it also takes masculine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

No, all three are feminine: "die Elbe", "die Spree", "die Donau".
And all nouns are capitalized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/relox84

Unfortunately no, rivers have an unpredictable gender: Die Elbe, die Spree and die Donau are all feminine. Though as far as I know, there are no rivers with a neuter gender name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/frank189188

Two spelling for the same name of the river, shown spelt one way and when I spell using that spelling, its wrong.
It this because german spelling and english spelling of the river name are different ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

OIndeed. The original German name of the River is "Rhein". But English speaking people woulkd not know how to pronounce this, that's why it is spelled "Rhine" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FireEmblem13106

So Rhein is a name of a place, right? Why is it zum and not zu or zur or something...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

"Rhein" is the name of a river. And it is masculine: "der Rhein".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Umar.Hasan

Why not "nach Rhein"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

Because "Rhein" is neither a country nor a city.
It is a river. So you use a different preposition ("zu") and the definite article, which combine to "zum".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lordbrockington

Really, I failed this because it's spelled Rhine in English but Rhein in German? WTF. It's so close I never even noticed that before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

It is spelled "Rhine" in English in order to approach the correct pronunciation. The true German name is "Rhein" (derived from "Rhenus (Latin)).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BananeSaft

Mann sagt gehe und nicht komme


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

So, what is the difference between "ZUM" and "DEM" in this instance?

CORRECT: "Ich komme mit dir zum Rhein."
INCORRECT: "Ich komme mit dir dem Rhein."

ZUM (to the). DEM (to the)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketzal681041

Because you missed the "zu"

Correct but rare: Ich komme mit dir zu dem Rhein.

Correct and common: Ich komme mit dir zum Rhein. (zu dem -> zum)

Always the prepositon is necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

The second variant is wrong. "dem" does not mean "to the", but only "the". There are some context where you could translate the German dative with "to", but that holds only for indirect objects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaleb164806

Encountered "the Rhine" for the first time during a "personalized quiz". Good luck guessing the correct spelling!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobynJacks7

why not an der rhein


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

because "an" (a two-way preposition) requires an accusative when talking about a direction.
Even if you were talking about the static case (which takes the dative), it would be "an dem Rhein" or rather "am Rhein". You can naver take noinative case after "an".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ems747

This sentence sounds ominous. What are we doing at the Rhine? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeyurUpasa2

why is "ich komme mit euch zum Rhein" wrong? please help


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

It isn't. Indeed it is one of the accepted answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juergen37040

I kept getting it wrong because I kept using "Rhine." Duh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

The correct spelling of this river is "Rhein" in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dale679559

Why wouldn't "ich komme zur Rhine mit dir" be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

1.) the name of the river is "Rhein". "Rhine" is only the English spelling.
2.) "Rhein" is masculine, so it is not "zur" but "zum".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dale679559

Thank you! After I posted I realized that I had misspelled 'Rhein', but I couldn't remember the gender of the word. Would it have been correct with those changes?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bwr8196

Tricky, kept putting "Rhine" in there instead of Rhein and got buzzed, whoops.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/best.ley

So, kommen ist dativ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

"kommen" is a verb. Verbs don't have cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeWagner2

When you type "I am coming with you to the Rhine" into Google translate, it gives you, "Ich komme mit dir an den Rhein". Duolingo marks this as wrong. Little frustrating. I guess because they haven't taught me "an" yet and it's a dative preposition lesson. But, it shouldn't say it's wrong if it's a valid translation. It should say - another option is....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeWagner2

Nevermind. I typed "dem" Rhein. So, if you use "an" it's not dative. My mistake, Duo was right. I hate that. lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keithPirie

Answer should have been accepted one letter wrong in rhein unfair


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena500730

My answer was correct, i just didn't add a period...it was counted wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daddy858525

I tried ich komme mit zum Rhein following on from the logic of missing out the obvious , as in ich kann das, but it was marked as wrong- an reason why? My native speaker wife says this is correct so I have reported it for now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/relox84

The Rhine is a river in Western Germany: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhine

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