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"I am coming with you to the Rhine."

Translation:Ich komme mit dir zum Rhein.

January 4, 2018

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eoghan842360

Why doesn't "nach dem Rhein" work? Is nach only for more specific places like cities?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas328056

Indeed. 'Nach' is commonly used for geographical destinations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1122

Only for countries and cities. It is not used for mountains, rivers etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSavageIII

But the Rhine is a geographical destination...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueC88

The best way I've found of remembering that it's 'Zum' is the German folk-song 'Die Wacht am Rhein': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zikcHnimsxk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George44577

I'd also love to know this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HQMHamza

Nach is used with home or home country

Er kommt nach dem land Er kommt nach hause


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlak4

Why is " ich gehe mit dir zum Rhein" wrong? I think it is correct and says the same thing anyhow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaceNalbone

I think gehe would closer mean "going with" vs "coming with"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatherTM

I want to know why mit and not bei here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PopSixSquish

Why was I swimming 'zu Deutschland nach Österreich' but I'm coming 'mit dir zum Rhein'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1122

When deniting dierections you use "nach" for countries and cities (and home), but "zu" for buildings, rivers and other locations..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BananeSaft

Mann sagt gehe und nicht komme


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick705549

"gehe" would also be totally fine. It would mean something like 'we are going together'.

"Ich komme mit dir" implies that it's previously known that the other person is going and you are like "wait for me, i'm coming with you!" or "ok, i will join you"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielPere406044

Why is it dir and not dich?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George44577

dir is dative; dich is accusative (and to complete the trio: du ist nominative). mit is always followed by dative


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Treacle18

I still het get confused about bei vs mit. I thought mit was used only for a close relationship and bei would be better when accompanying someone. Why not bei?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ianbartley

Same here. Why mit not bei? I thought mit related to activity and bei to place?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatherTM

I want to know this too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

You are right "mit" is used for activites and "ich komme" is an activity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeGOgletree

My question is similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charles969992

Can I say "Ich komme zum Rhein mit dir"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillJim

Why "zum Rhein" [dative] rather than "zu den Rhein" [accusative]?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/George44577

zu always takes dative - https://dictionary.reverso.net/german-english/zu

Why zu always takes dative, though, I don't know!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chocolateska

"zu" is a preposition that signals the beginning of what is referred to as an "adverbial phrase". The noun object that comes after "zu" is not an object of any verb; it's an object of "zu" itself, and is thus indirect. Google "adverbial phrase" if you'd like a lesson on the structure in English. It applies similarly to German, you just have to remember which prepositions start one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdTyrone

So, what is the difference between "ZUM" and "DEM" in this instance?

CORRECT: "Ich komme mit dir zum Rhein."
INCORRECT: "Ich komme mit dir dem Rhein."

ZUM (to the). DEM (to the)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian207379

Why not ich komme mit Sie zum Rhein?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/requin230

Ich komme mit dir zum Rhein - informal

Ich komme mit Ihnen zum Rhein - formal

Ich komme mit Sie zum Rhein - incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1122

you need a dative after "mit". The dative of "Sie" is "Ihnen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaleb164806

Encountered "the Rhine" for the first time during a "personalized quiz". Good luck guessing the correct spelling!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marijuslau

Hi, recently in this module in one of the comment sections I found an explanation that "to be with someone" is either bei or mit ... zusammen

I tried: "Ich komme mit dir zusammen zum Rhein." and it didn't work. So is the zusammen required or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1122

That's a different case. The two examples work for "to be with someone". If you have a different verb that describes an action (like "to come" in this case), you just say "mit dir" to indicate that you do this action togeteher. No "bei" and no "zusammen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobynJacks7

why not an der rhein


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef
Mod
  • 1122

because "an" (a two-way preposition) requires an accusative when talking about a direction.
Even if you were talking about the static case (which takes the dative), it would be "an dem Rhein" or rather "am Rhein". You can naver take noinative case after "an".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ems747

This sentence sounds ominous. What are we doing at the Rhine? :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena500730

My answer was correct, i just didn't add a period...it was counted wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/relox84

The Rhine is a river in Western Germany: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhine

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