"Tee hilft gegen den Durst."

Translation:Tea helps against thirst.

1/5/2018, 1:54:00 AM

75 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/leetong0412
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The "correct" answer is bad English. "Tea helps with thirst" would also be a correct answer, but it's marked as wrong here. Please fix.

1/8/2018, 2:11:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/NuclearMr.Rogers

What i don't get is sometimes this app will only accept the answer that sounds right in english, but not the literal translation. Other times, it's vice versa.

8/8/2018, 11:08:32 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/dave.pretty
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Reporting, I assume yet again, 7/22/18.

7/22/2018, 8:50:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrew703962

2018/09/26 still nothing

9/26/2018, 6:50:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/huntress25
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"Tea helps when thirsty" is the now correct. 03Oct18

10/3/2018, 4:58:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
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Was tea thirsty? While I understand what you mean, IMHO this is bad English, and personally I would not accept it.

12/29/2018, 6:44:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidHarri227108
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"Tea helps prevent thirst" is probably a better way to say it.

2/20/2019, 11:13:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BeverleyMa12

This is a literal translation. In Australia we would not say "helps against the thirst"

1/13/2018, 11:57:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jean564934
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I agree, this translation is not natural UK English either.

1/19/2018, 5:49:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/myitguy

Or Canadian English

2/12/2018, 3:20:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStockwell
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What kind of cr@p English sentence is it, anyway? It's just the German translated word for word.

2/28/2018, 12:58:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SandyDR

Or American

8/10/2018, 8:15:20 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kim1947
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Tea helps to quench the thirst - why not?

1/5/2018, 3:20:33 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/quis_lib_duo
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= Tee hilft, den Durst zu stillen.

1/5/2018, 8:29:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/vlaus
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The trouble is that a literal translation of "gegen" doesn't work in English. We would never say "Tea/water/etc helps AGAINST thirst."

3/25/2018, 7:17:49 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ktamkun
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I'm a native speaker of California English and "tea helps against thirst" sounds completely idiomatic to me. "Helps with thirst" makes it sound as though tea causes thirst.

8/23/2018, 6:52:28 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Elardus

Fully agreed. There's nothing wrong with a drink helping 'against' thirst or food helping against 'hunger'. Does a painkiller drug help 'against' pain or 'with' pain? Both probably but 'against' seems also good.

9/7/2018, 2:32:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
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British English certainly endorses "Tea helps with thirst". I have even heard "Tea helps thirst". Illogical, I know, but that's what we say.

2/20/2019, 3:12:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Abs260205

I had the same problem.

2/14/2018, 12:40:09 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelBig909405

Argh, this is so awkwardly unidiomatic in English.

1/22/2018, 2:12:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/nglwn6
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I think "Tea helps combat thirst" would be a more natural way to say this.

1/19/2018, 9:58:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/VikingBob_57

Sadly, when I entered "Tea helps combat thirst," it was marked as incorrect.

5/2/2018, 11:36:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JessRoamalot

this sentence is in the accusative case right because of 'gegen'. whats it doing in the dative skill

2/14/2018, 1:00:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MeganHolloran

I thought 'gegen' was an Akkusativ Präposition, actually...

11/16/2018, 8:34:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/zeus36

To test your skills? I actually like that, so I know that I got the answer correctly because I learnt the grammar and thought about the answer, not because this question is in X lesson so the answer must be Y. I believe that also keeps you focused on the material rather than going through the exercises like a bot.

11/20/2018, 12:05:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnAdamClark

I specifically chose to strengthen my Dative skills, so getting tripped up with other cases is annoying, to me at least

3/18/2019, 8:51:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidHarri227108
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I think you're right technically, but my opinion is that it's useful to practice this stuff in context. If you know everything's gonna be dative, that's a sort of crutch. I'd rather have a little more variety in among the questions touching on the dative case.

3/18/2019, 9:08:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom92870
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I agree, helps quench the thirst sounds better to me

1/20/2018, 7:09:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaZem1

To quench thirst is much better English, but is marked as incorrect. This needs to be corrected.

2/6/2018, 3:57:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NeoFlerin
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It has been added

8/15/2018, 1:31:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMay4
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Does tea help against Fred Durst?

3/15/2018, 7:21:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ZoranVasil2

Why dativ ?

1/25/2018, 12:53:01 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Eloise23
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Jan 27, 2018 - Tee hilft gegen den Durst No dative here. Gegen takes accusative, and hilft (a dative verb) has no object in this sentence.

1/28/2018, 12:28:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DanDone1012

Gegen(Against) is a preposition so "den Durst" should be the object of the preposition so it should be dative right?

2/15/2018, 10:50:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcCann6

No, prepositions can demand accusative, dative or genitive case (and some --the two-way prepositions-- can demand both accusative and dative in different sentences, depending on whether the corresponding object is the "destination". So "auf/on" can demand dative when something is "on the table/auf dem Tisch", and accusative when something is put "on(to) the table/auf den Tisch" ).

You have to remember the case together with the preposition. "Gegen", for example, is an accusative preposition, as illustrated in the example above.

3/25/2018, 8:50:19 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/WolfVonPosen

So dativ is not move ,accusative move?

5/9/2018, 8:54:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcCann6

For two-way prepositions? If the object of the preposition is the target of the movement involved then it's accusative. Otherwise it'll be dative. For example "in" as a preposition means "into" when the associated tense is accusative, and it means "in" when the tense is dative. "in das Kino" ((in)to the cinema) versus "in dem Kino" (in the cinema). It's worth noting that the two-way prepositions are "positional": an, auf, in, neben, zwischen, etc...

Corrections, clarifications, and alternative insights warmly welcomed, as always!

5/10/2018, 1:50:36 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoseLoretoRomero

Gegen wird immer mit dem Akkusativ gebraucht.

2/2/2018, 1:09:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/falkdav
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Is Tee hilft gegen Durst a valid sentence?

10/10/2018, 3:47:08 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/KMosuzu

I want to know it as well! the thirst in English specifies the thirst. But I am not sure that here 'den' specifies the thirst or just needs 'den' no matter. German's articles are difficult for me!

10/22/2018, 6:21:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Esilou
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"Tea helps to quench your(or the) thirst" would be good English rather than what is called the correct solution

2/21/2018, 1:56:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NeoFlerin
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It has been added.

8/15/2018, 1:32:25 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterM1993

Why do we need the den to write "the thirst", why not just "thirst"/Durst?

7/27/2018, 11:31:57 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankEdger
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Native English speakers would never say, "helps against the thirst." Please correct this!!

2/8/2018, 4:19:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/zeus36

Would it still sound natural to Germans if you omit "den"? And what sounds more natural, with or without den?

11/20/2018, 12:08:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CHambleton

I keep getting it wrong!

1/16/2019, 6:56:07 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidRichf
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"Tea helps for thirst" is natural and should also be accepted.

3/3/2019, 2:42:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/benutzer94

Wouldn't a more suitable translation be "Tea quenches your thirst" or "Tea helps to quench your thirst"

6/5/2018, 11:49:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/nerdymathstuff
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Thr correct answer is not common English usage.

7/29/2018, 2:12:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindhMani
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The suggested translation "helps with" is still not accepted. (Aug '18)

8/10/2018, 7:42:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Thatguy94
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Why den?

9/2/2018, 9:17:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulMcCann6

"Durst" is a masculine noun and it's accusative because "gegen" is an accusative preposition. Hence "gegen den Durst" in the above sentence.

9/2/2018, 9:39:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/huntress25
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"Tea helps when thirsty" is the new correct. 03Oct18

10/3/2018, 4:58:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisRiche7

I typed " tea is helpful against thirst" and was marked wrong - can anyone explain why, please?

10/10/2018, 9:56:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Will709432
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Would a German really say it this way, helps against thirst? Isn't there a verb for quench? Could you say Tee löscht den durst? Or is löschen not a dative verb. Maybe it's completely the wrong verb to use, I'm just guessing here

11/6/2018, 7:52:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mik28076

What is the purpose of den in front of durst? Is it just an article required, I am confused.

2/5/2019, 11:50:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/LuigiLinguine
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Yaasss sis you spill that tea to stop them thirsty queens

3/9/2019, 4:12:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Tryuji.

Tee helps combat thirst.

3/10/2019, 10:17:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/esalesky
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is the 'den' necessary?

3/11/2019, 4:18:36 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve32837

"Tea helps against thirst" is something one could say in English, but it can't be the only valid translation. This is the only time in which duolingo has ever insisted one use the most literal translation possible. These lessons are all over the place with what works and what doesn't.

3/18/2019, 10:09:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Puett
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OK, Duo - how about fixing this? Your translation is BAD ENGLISH!

2/14/2018, 10:25:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeCool487756

Why can't it tea helps thirst?

11/19/2018, 6:12:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AhChu1
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Can "Tea helps fight the thirst" be considered a correct answer?

12/28/2018, 10:17:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NeoFlerin
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Hi. No native speaker would ever say that sentence alone. I can imagine someone trying to be original saying 'Tea helps [to fight OR with fighting OR fight] thirst' but not with the "the" determiner.

Tea helps with thirst and Tea helps quench thirst are the most natural-sounding options.

12/28/2018, 11:01:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AhChu1
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Do you mean it doesnt sound natural in English or in German? And would "Tea helps fight thirst" work instead?

12/28/2018, 11:15:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NeoFlerin
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I mean it doesn't sound natural in English. If you mean would it 'work' on Duolingo, then that depends on whether the mods program it in. I'm speaking from an English teacher's point of view. And yes, "tea helps (to) fight thirst" without the "the" that you used sound a bit better. But the use of the verb 'fight' with being thirsty is the issue here. It's not a common combination is native speech.

Similarly, the verb to use when talking about hunger would be "to sate", not "to fight".

You can 'fight' a disease, for example.

So when someone says something doesn't sound "natural" they're mostly referring to "appropriacy" and native frequency of use.

Hope that helps.

12/28/2018, 11:32:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AhChu1
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I think it sounds fine in English. I'm not an English teacher, but it isn't really breaking any laws, per se. And it sounds just as natural as "Tea helps against thirst", if not more. I was just asking from the German perspective if it would translate over well, because I do think Duolingo should have accepted the answer. Thanks for the help, though.

12/29/2018, 12:03:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AhChu1
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Or "Tea helps to fight thirst"?

12/28/2018, 11:16:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PWkXZCsm

New lady audio on fast speed is really difficult to understand, but clearer at slower speed

1/15/2019, 4:51:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Will709432
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Lol the new lady sounds like the woman on Google translate

1/16/2019, 12:16:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewSchm830166

I can't understand any noise it makes. Needs improved

1/31/2018, 9:40:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DarkTale19
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Tea actually doesn't help fight thirst. It's a diuretic which means that it cleanses the body of toxins.

1/5/2018, 1:54:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/vlaus
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In addition, it does help with thirst. All liquids do. You count tea/coffee towards your fluid intake for the day. Ask any qualified dietitian (or even Dr Google!)

3/25/2018, 7:20:33 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickVroman

Tea is indeed a diuretic, but that actually means it increases urination. That doesn't have much to do with "cleansing" or "toxins".

3/14/2018, 5:09:47 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Elijah538219

Also, 'antioxidants' remove oxides. Oxides are composed of Oxygen, which is found in water. Hence taking antioxidants will dehydrate you.

3/30/2018, 4:04:29 PM
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