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  5. "干杯!生日快乐!"

"干杯!生日快乐!"

Translation:Cheers! Happy Birthday!

January 8, 2018

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celticfiddleguy

干杯 (cheers) is literally "dry cup" and of course referring to a drink (toast) not "cheers" as a casual greeting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Bottoms up! Happy birthday!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seanxluong

干杯 literally means "to empty the cup", so the correct translation should be "bottom up" or something that conveys the idea of having the cup empty. "Cheers" is too superficial a translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steveobenn

Yes. I think it stems from traditional Chinese drinking culture using smaller cups/glasses and not with pint glasses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan946894

2020.7.17
干杯 is basically said when toasting. If you have a pint of beer or a glass of wine, obviously that does not mean "bottoming up" all that in a single swig. The characters' literal meaning may be that however


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nivkotzer

A bit like Japanese "kampai"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Keith_APP

Actually they really are the same, in the original Traditional Chinese characters and in their meaning. 乾杯!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/helen753021

干杯 生日快乐 I pUt this after audio and is this not correct ?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeaceJoyPancakes

Duolingo doesn't accept spaces in Chinese, so you'll have to try using actual punctuation, without spaces.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan946894

2020.7.17
Just leave the actual punctuation out. I don't think Duo cares

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