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"La fruta está escasa."

Translation:Fruit is scarce.

5 years ago

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jwguillery

I find this translation in English kind of awkward. I wonder if this particular Spanish formulation is common or even grammatically correct (singular with escasa). comments?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

The sentence is incorrect, as "es" should be used. La fruta es escasa. Of course it wouldn't be unheard of... some localisms and so, but I wouldn't believe that expression would be accepted by any institution.

There is the possibility of using escasear, the verb La fruta escasea.

With estar, it is possible to say "la fruta está escaseando" which is an odd way of saying "la fruta empieza a escasear"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Thanks for the explanation. I looked up escasear = to be scarce. It's a tricky one for an English speaker as we think of scarce as an adjective, rather than a verb.

I also checked the Corpus del Español, and found zero instances of "está escasa", but 47 instances of "escasea" and 64 of "escasean". Here are some examples...

"El agua escasea en muchas regiones" = "Water is scarce in many regions"

"El trabajo escasea" = "Work is scarce"

"Los alimentos escasean" = "Food is scarce"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitcorb

I vaguely remember in previous discussion, a difference in the use of es and está to indicate transient or permanent condition. Is this so? Or am I getting this confused?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

You're right. Generally speaking that is it.

I cannot quote a rule on this, I am sorry. However that has also to be taken with a pinch of salt , for instance you say Es Viernes, it is not a "permanent" condition.

The best practice here is not to use ser/estar altogether. La fruta escasea is a complete sentence. If the speaker wants to focus on the present situation you may say: La fruta es escasa.

A recurring sentence is: "el agua potable es un bien escaso" where agua can be the expensive resource of your choice. There it makes emphasis on the fact that it's not abundant.

If you want to go for the "we are running low on that stuff" you may use estar but then you need: La fruta está escaseando. The situation is changing and therefore is a continuous process (if you will), which is exactly the same as la fruta escasea. estar+verb+ando gives you the idea of the "running low".

Up to some extent you can use this rule of thumb:

La fruta es un bien escaso (there is not much of it) La fruta comienza a escasear (the beginning of the shortages) La fruta está escaseando (we running low on fruit) --- very similar to the one above La fruta es escasa (fruit is scarce) No hay más fruta ( there is no more fruit)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Estar = Locations, and Conditions; Temporary states; Action ended "Scarcity" is temporary. Thus, "estar escasa."

Acronym for estar = PLACE Position (está sentada) ; Location (está a la derecho); Action (estamos leyendo); Condition (Estoy cansado); Emotion (estoy triste).

Ser= Think of it as "equal" Generally a long-lasting or permanent condition.

Acronym for "ser" is DOCTOR. Description (es alto); Occupation (soy profesor ) ; Characteristic; (es agradable) Origen; Relationship (es mi madre)

http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100040/ser-vs.-estar

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"la fruta" may mean more than one piece of fruit. fruit in English can have a plural meaning as well

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aumbria

Awww, poor fruit.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

"Fruit is scarce" would be a more appropriate translation, the "the" is not needed in English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Caversham
Caversham
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They have dropped "The". Ella es bonita = She is pretty. Ella esta bonita = more like She looks pretty (now, but on other occasions looks anything but).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterDowns

I was wondering, if "la fruta" means both "fruit" in general and "the fruit" in particular (like the exact kind of fruit I have in my hand), how would one differentiate in Spanish between a "fruit (in general) is scarce" and "the fruit (the kind that I'm holding up) is scarce"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Yes and no. Normally yes, the definite article+subject in Spanish can be either the definite article+subject (specific) or just the subject (general) in English. In this sentence though, no, not technically. We could say it was rare, "La fruta es rara," or we could say the type of fruit is scarce, "Este tipo de fruta es escaso," but saying a specific piece of fruit is scarce doesn't really make sense (although if you said it everyone would understand you). As far as differentiating specific and general subjects in Spanish, sometimes the same situation can apply, other times only context will tell.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut2

I put "la fruta escasa." They said that "el agua escasa" was accceptable why is this not? I was testing this and now it's wrong...........I don't get it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeacockBlue
PeacockBlue
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You may have written El agua escasea when you got it right.
Escasa is an adjective, and so, el agua escasa translates to the water scarce; it needs a verb such as is to complete the sentence.
Escasear, on the other hand, is an (intransitive) verb that means to be scarce (whereas in English scarce is only an adjective) so, el agua escasea translates directly to water is scarce

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Im_Andrea

Could someone explain why it's "está" and not "es"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

The way I understand, is is not in the nature of fruit to be scarce, thus no "fruta es escasa." "es' can refer to the nature of things. Or, what something IS generally.

Esta refers to what someone, something, is at this moment, or how someone feels now.

Scarcity is a temporary condition, one that can change. or not be permanent" Therefore, use "esta"

There is a difference between "a bad person" (el es mal" and a person who is sick (el esta mal).

Ella es un filosofico; Ella esta seindo filosofico, (She is a philosopher; she is being philosophical.

Tu eres guapo (you are handsome, a handsome person). Tu estas guapo ahora (you look handsome now )

Ella es una enfermera (she is a nurse (person who works with sick people); Ella esta enferma (she is sick)

El es cansado (he is tiresome, a tiring person); El esta cansado (he is tired.)

Ella es abierta (she is an open person). La tienda esta abierta. (the store is open)

Yo soy un debil (I am a weakling); Yo estoy debil (I am feeling weak.)

Ella es fresca (She is cheeky, a smart aleck); ella esta fresca (she is (feels) fresh

El es bajo (he is short in height); el esta bajo (he is depressed, feeling way down)

Ella es frio (she is a cold, unfeeling person); Ella esta frio (she is cold.)

Yo soy viejo (I am old); yo estoy viejo (I am looking old)

El es orgulloso (he is an boastful, arrogant person); El esta orgulloso (he feels pride (is proud of something))

https://apps.spokane.edu/InternetContent/AutoWebs/bonnieb/Span%20221-222-223/ser-estar%20adjectives.pdf

And so forth. At least, this is how I see it, and it seems to help me.

Hope it helps you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georj_drama

ecarce = rare ??? Fruit is scarce = Fruit is rare ( is this the same ) ??? Because i don't understand what is "scarce" in English

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"Scarce" means "not easy to find." "Scarce" significa " no es facil encontrar," "poco comun" (not common), No hay mucha fruta disponible. "Raro" (rare) probablemente no es muy bueno como una significa.

"Scarce" implies (connotes) a temporary condition; "rare" implies a more permanent condition. Diamonds are rare; In winter, fruit may be scarce. Dismantes son raros; fruta, a menudo en inverno, esta escasa (puede estar escasa)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/georj_drama

vale, gracias

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hippietrail
hippietrail
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Ironically, diamonds are no longer rare since a couple of gigantic diamond mines were discovered and exploited in Africa. But the diamond market is very effectively controlled by a near-monopoly. A company called De Beers is the major player.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonjackson1

This time it is "escasa" and last time "escasea". Can anyone help?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parmachella

In a previous question DL gave the correct answer to the meaning of escasa as "test." I cannot find any remotely related definition in the dictionary. (Same goes for DL definition of "ocupa" = deal.) Are these colloquial usages? Common? What?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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As far as escasa/test goes I have no idea, but the pronominal verb "Ocuparse" can be used to mean "deal" as in "Ella se ocupa del pago" - "She deals with the payment."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PiaKonstmann
PiaKonstmann
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Thank you to all of you who found this sentence awkward!
Perhaps it is another trick question to see if we are paying attention to what we are learning? I guess we have passed the test be reacting here? ;) My point of learning a new language from basic is to get to the to know common and useful sentences and words.
All the words and phrases here could easily have been used/constructed in ways that really make sense, instead of some that will never be used in daily life!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnaKerie
AnaKerie
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At first I read this as "The fruit escapes."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jayden_up9538

Hey whats up everybody it's Scarce here

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulValery0
PaulValery0
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The translation is very odd! One can say, 'We're low on fruit' but not 'The fruit is low'. Another error for duolingo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ntitan
Ntitan
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This sentence will come in handy when I join a crew of Spanish pirates and I we're commenting on the ongoing scurvy epidemic.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elmerdinkly
elmerdinkly
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Whats wrong with the fruit is rare?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Rare"/raro is something else than "scarce"/escaso. The former means that it's hard to find in general, but "scarce" doesn't say anything about that - just that there's not much of it at all.

Like, in a nearly empty water reservoir the water is not rare, it's right there. It's just scarce, you have to be careful about using it.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hobbit_CZ

What is wrong on "The fruit is missing."? DL use translation of está escarso to "is missing" in this sentence: "El arroz está escaso de sal."

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"To be missing" only works as a translation of "estar escaso" if there's an object. In "El arroz está escaso de sal" you say that salt is missing from the rice. There's some salt in there, but scarcely so.

If you say "The fruit is missing", you imply that it is completely gone. But "es escasa" (it really shouldn't be está) says that the fruit is still there - there is just not a lot of it.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"La fruta es escasa"

7 months ago