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"Tomorrow, Duo visits his friend, the king."

Translation:Morgen besucht Duo seinen Freund, den König.

January 9, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spicy-Wolf

Why not "Morgen, Duo besucht..." rather than "Morgen besucht Duo..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That's not how we say it in German.

The time specification Morgen is part of the sentence (not separated from it by a comma), takes up the first position if you want to put it first and so the verb has to follow it immediately in order to be in the second position where it belongs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blueice54

Thanks, this one confused me. This often comes up with commas in German vs. English. In English, the comma usage does have some meaning, even if it doesn't change the actual content of the sentence. It can really change the tone or pace of a sentence. So, is there a parallel way to set "morgen" apart in this sentence? For example, these two English sentences are quite different, though the meaning could be the same:

"Tomorrow, Duo visits his friend, the king." "Duo visits his friend, the king, tomorrow."

A better example might be something like this:

"Tomorrow, I will go to the store." "I will go to the store tomorrow."

One is a bit more abrupt, and the other is slower paced. Isn't there a way to make this distinction in German?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

One is a bit more abrupt, and the other is slower paced. Isn't there a way to make this distinction in German?

No, not in the same way.

You can say Morgen gehe ich ins Geschäft and Ich gehe morgen ins Geschäft, or Morgen besucht Duo seinen Freund, den König and Duo besucht morgen seinen Freund, den König, but neither of those is abrupt.

Putting the adverb first marks it as the topic ("I'm going to tell you what will happen tomorrow:") but it's still part of the sentence structure, there is no comma, and no sense of abruptness or change of pace.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bekir978479

can you not say "seinen freund, DER König" because der König is like a separate sentence meaning who is the king?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quis_lib_duo

No, it is an apposition and has to be in the same case as the word it refers to,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DesertFox1978

Warum „Morgen wird Duo seinen Freund besuchen, den König“ ist falsch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"his friend, the king" (seinen Freund, den König) should stay together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gilla2605

Duo besucht seinen Freund, den König, morgen. I think this is also right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Duo besucht seinen Freund, den König, morgen. I think this is also right.

Time expressions such as morgen generally come right after the verb in German -- not at the end of the sentence as in English.

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