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  5. "그 여자가 가르치면 저는 한국어를 잘 배워요."

" 여자가 가르치면 저는 한국어를 배워요."

Translation:If that woman teaches, I learn Korean well.

January 9, 2018

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mkeays

Can someone break down 가르치면?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wintertriangles

가르치다 is "to teach". Adding ~(으)면 to the verb stem adds the "if/when" part.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nagtatago

가르치다 + 하면 teach + if


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cinnamon5230

Can I say "If that woman teaches, I will learn Korean well"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

Your translation is grammatically correct, in English. The example given would be better translated perhaps as "When that woman teaches I learn Korean well".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ishier1

No. For that sentence you would need to attach 겠 or another equivalent marker to put the verb 배우(다) into the future tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PramaNeo

"I learn Korean well when that woman teaches me." - why doesn't this work, if 'when' is a possibility for ~(으)면?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raven480445

If thar woman teaches Korean, I learn well should be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

Correct in meaning, maybe but grammatically inaccurate.

As the example shows:

한국어를 잘 배워요 -> 한국어 (= Korean) is the object complement of 배워요 (= I learn).

My guess is your suggestion would be better translated as:

If that woman teaches Korean, I learn it well =

그 여자가 한국어를 가르치면 잘 배워요.

where 한국어 is the object complement of 가르치다 (= teach)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raven480445

Thanks for that. In this instance, I would argue that accurate meaning should take precedence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

I reckon the idea is if we were asked to do a reverse translation, would we be able to reproduce the Korean sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shaurya631596

So this sentence could be both "If that woman teaches..." and "When that woman teaches..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oee16

Yes. It appears that Koreans use (으)면 for both if-conditional clauses and if/when-time clauses, to speak about present event.

The distinction is perhaps in the tense used in the main clause.

With the (으)면, when(-ever) time clause, the present is used in the main clause; Future, propositive and imperative with (으)면, if-conditional clause.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcoGual2

Hello duolingo im from mexico and im studying corean in English its hard because i have to ler in English and then pass it to spanish.

You dont have corean spanish ??? Please say yes

Thank you for your time


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zen30802

Can my answer also be accepted,

"If that woman teaches, I will learn korean well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daphne297937

if that she teaches, i learn Korean well

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