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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MasterZsword

For those who are interested... (or have felt de-motivated lately)

So, while I was cruising the web after my college classes ended, I came across an interesting article called "25 Fascinating Facts That Will Make You Wish You Could Speak Every Language in the World" by Abraham Piper.

Here is the link to the website: http://twentytwowords.com/25-fascinating-language-facts/

While reading these facts, it sort of increased my motivation, but I felt more intrigued than motivated. Some facts destroyed my original beliefs about certain languages. Some facts actually applied directly to me and I never knew before.

For instance, one fact states, "Other than extinct languages, 'Cryptophasias" have the fewest speakers. These are private languages developed by twins."

I happen to be a twin and both of us created a language that no one else in my family could decipher while growing up. I had no idea this private language actually possessed a name. Well, "languages", since not all Cryptophasias between twins are the same, I assume. I would call myself fluent in two languages, however, my twin died in 2009 and my knowledge of the language, for a lack of better terms... "Died" with it. So, I'll just have to be content with being monolingual for the time being. Although, it was still interesting to know that the language I formed with my twin in the past could be recognized as a true language (assumingly not an "official" language, since I have no idea if these private languages could be called official.).

I just wanted to share this article for anyone who has felt demotivated during their studies or just wanted to learn something new about languages while learning on Duolingo. If you already knew some of the facts (or even all) in this article, then I apologize! However, if you can actually relate to some of these, I would be glad to hear it. And, if you know more facts about world languages that weren't mentioned here, enlighten us!

Have a blessed day!

January 13, 2018

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maughanster_

Wow! Those are really cool.

I’m sorry that you lost your twin, that sucks. :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MasterZsword

I'm glad you liked them!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmegaGmaster

Thank you so much for this... Lately I've been in a falling out due to school and my work in cryptocurrency. The shoutout to Archi was one of my favorites. ❤️


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MasterZsword

I feel your pain. I have not been studying Japanese and Korean like I used to due to school, but I'm glad you found this valuable!

I have no idea what cryptocurrency is and I know I could look it up, but it sounds like a study beyond my understanding. ^ ^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaGuaGua

Very interesting! The language with no vowels.....how!?!?!

There is also a clicking language that's really cool! Its called Khoisan and it sounds like its probably near impossible to learn. The vowels are clicks I believe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmegaGmaster

There are vowels, but they can be pronounced in many different ways (breathy voice, creaky voice, and these can be combined with nasalization too afaik).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Having words with no vowels is a trait at least some languages share.

Here's a well-known example from Nuxalk, a language indigenous to western British Colombia : clhp'xwlhtlhplhhskwts' in IPA [xɬpʼχʷɬtʰɬpʰɬːskʷʰt͡sʼ] It means "then he had had in his possession a bunchberry plant." There was actually somebody who know something of the language (and was hoping Duolingo would set up a course for it to help convey the existing elders' knowledge) who explained the grammatical structure of this word in a forum post here a while back.

Slovak also has a good number of vowel-free words: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Category:Slovak_words_without_vowels

English itself has pretty long consonant clusters. "Strengths" only has one vowel, so any English speaker can pretty easily pronounce something as long as "ngths" with no vowels. Granted, that only has three phonemes, but, I bet you still wouldn't have too much trouble pronouncing it if I added something like "ptl" onto the front of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Woof.

Fascinating! Thank you for sharing! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MasterZsword

Yes, they are fascinating! It is my pleasure. ^ ^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissSpells

Thanks for sharing your story and these motivational facts!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MasterZsword

Glad to hear you found them motivational!


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