1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Duolingo
  4. >
  5. How long does it take you to …

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrenchCamille

How long does it take you to do a timed practice and regular lesson?

I need to know so I can average them all together to calculate how long it would take to get 1000xp.

Thanks in advance!!

January 13, 2018

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camilla-danesa

To answer your question, I just did a timed practice in the middle of the spanish tree. It took 5 minutes and I got 85% correct.

There is no way I could do this multiple times, I have to recover from rushing through it. I have sometimes experimented with doing the exercises really fast, and I was getting brain freeze.

I HIGHLY SUGGEST that you do not stress while you are learning. The stress you feel will often get tied to the material you are learning, and it will be there waiting for you when you go to that part of your brain next time.

My advice is: Learn and enjoy it! Savor that you are letting new discoveries into your mind. Feel secure that you are laying down patterns in your mind that you can trust and rely on. Do not go into learning while in a mad rush. It is counterproductive.

If you really want to prove yourself, take up writing letters for a good cause, or go to a climbing gym, or volunteer to help someone learn to read, or help with a food drive.

Then you can learn at a reasonable rate.

I think you might decide to rush, in spite of my suggestions. If you do, make sure you build in breaks every so often in your study time. 15 minutes every hour. (Stretch. Drink something, maybe tea. Walk about. Talk to someone)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Everdella

Do not go into learning while in a mad rush. It is counterproductive.

Exactly, have a few lingots. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

There is no way I could do this multiple times, I have to recover from rushing through it. I have sometimes experimented with doing the exercises really fast, and I was getting brain freeze.

I take the opposite view; if it's stressful and difficult, it means you aren't as good as it as you could be, and therefore you should keep trying to do it until it's easy. Most things are only difficult because we're not used to them, and stressful because we think they're difficult. Stress often makes the brain more retentive, as this an evolutionary strategy for avoiding danger: in this case, the only 'danger' is getting questions wrong, but the brain will see it in the same way as almost being caught be a wolf, and strengthen the memory of the correct solution so that the situation is less likely to re-occur in the future.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wombatua

Your approach won't work. People work at different speeds - whatever speed you do may not be my speed, and it doesn't matter what the difference is. Slow and steady leads to understanding, not ridiculous speed. It'll take however long it takes to get to 1,000 points. And that's a meaningless number, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dcarl1

It is highly variable depending on unit and familiarity. I think I did Italian clitics 30 times before I understood it, and the first dozen times it took forever to complete a unit. While something like “business” was super fast.

Not one to squash goals, but 1000 is just a number. Focusing on it alone may lead to skill gulping which will result in shallow knowledge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Everdella

but 1000 is just a number. Focusing on it alone may lead to skill gulping which will result in shallow knowledge.

I wish I could give you all the lingots in the world for this.

A lot of people on Duolingo don't seem to understand that Duolingo is about learning, not about numbers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wombatua

Is Ukrainian hard? Again, that depends on how good one is with languages. I certainly wouldn't call it easy for someone native in English; the Foreign Service Institute classifies it as a category IV language, one with significant linguistic or cultural differences from English. Your main language here, French, they classify as category I.

If it's the alphabet that discourages you, don't let that be a factor. Learning Ukrainian Cyrillic is easy. It's the cases and conjugations that make it hard, in my opinion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrenchCamille

Alright thanks for the info!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Everdella

My grandmother is fluent in Ukrainian and Russian, both of which are beautiful languages :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wombatua

Personally, I'd say Ukrainian is prettier - less guttural, with the г more of an aspirated English h instead of a hard g ("gamburger," I just don't like). And much less of the "aya" ending.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Everdella

Out of curiosity, how well can you read/write/speak/understand Ukrainian?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wombatua

Eh. When I lived in the country, I was good enough to get around - to get train tickets, buy groceries, the like. But that was twenty years ago. These days, I wouldn't call myself close to fluent, even though I've finished the tree here. But I could hold my own were I back in Kyiv or Lviv or Frankivsk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Everdella

There's no exact time it takes people to do a timed practice session because there are a LOT of factors at play here, like how fast you can type, how well you know the words in that session, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirezatav

Welsh is the only language I really do timed practices in ATM. I did a couple of skills just now, here are my averages...

~first 1/3 of the course: 1:10 - 1:30
Middle of the course: 1:10-1:40
~last 1/3 of the course: 1:20-2:00

Disabling audio questions (type-what-you-hear) seems to takes around 10 seconds off my time in later skills, as I often have to listen to longer sentences twice.

Bear in mind that I personally only do timed practices in skills I feel I already know pretty well, so that probably decreases my time a bit.

(I've tried doing timed practices in Polish, and in Welsh skills I don't know particularly well - aside from the first two checkpoints in Polish, I almost always get beaten by the clock! I still need more "normal" practice before I can do timed exercises, clearly, haha.)

As for getting 1,000 exp, if I'm focusing and just repeating timed practices to revise I usually get there in about an hour. If I'm doing new skills, or revising old skills without timed practices, it varies a lot, but I think it seems to take around two to two and a half hours to get to that point.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissSpells

If your goal is to accumulate lot’s of xp in a short time, I would suggest using the app. The exercises are much easier on the app and go much quicker. I haven’t timed myself but I feel I can do about five skills on the app in the time it takes me to do one online, the trade off being I learn less, but it is good for review. Do timed practice only for skills you already know really well, like reviewing basics. Also, stories and conversations with the bots seem to give alot of xp in a short time, and they are more fun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oritteropo1

It's quicker on computer, unless you type slowly, because you can get 20 points in timed practice in the same 5 minutes that only gets you 10 points on the app.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andresb_UY

15 (10+5 Bonus) Its easier and safe, you can "pause" and you can do it with just one finger with the phone under the table. Believe me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slogger

Just see how long it takes you to earn 100 (or 10) XPs and multiply that by 10 (or 100). You could have done that and figured it out in the time it has taken you to write and read this whole discussion.

Learn a language in just 5 minutes a day. For free.