"The audience likes the Swiss man."

Translation:Das Publikum mag den Schweizer.

January 18, 2018

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mijiturka

What is wrong with "Der Schweizer gefällt dem Publikum"?

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/stepintime

Perfectly fine.

"mögen" feels a bit more like "liking on a personal level", while "gefallen" would be more like "they like his performance (or also: they think he's handsome)".

July 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink

I used "hat den Schweizer gern", and DL rejected it. Why?

July 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/stepintime

This would mean that the Swiss man holds a dear place in the audience's hearts. It's not wrong, only unlikely in the given context ...well, in the context I'd assume here, which is that the audience just likes what the Swiss man is doing.

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/J.C.Fink

So "gern haben" is stronger than "mögen"?

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/stepintime

In short: ...yes.

I think people might have different opinions on that, and the main difference is that you tend to use "gern haben" for people and not so much for things.

"Ich mag Peter" and "Ich habe Peter gern" can both mean that "I quite like him, he's nice to be around" or "I fancy him and hope to marry him".
If I just "like" him in a less emotional way, e.g. I enjoy him coming along when I'm going out with my friends or working with him at the office, but I'm not overly attached to him, then "Ich mag Peter" is the phrase to use. But I think this depends on the region, too, so this is just my take on that...

"Ich mag Michael Jackson" would usually mean "I like his music", while "Ich habe Michael Jackson gern" wouldn't normally be used for that, it seems to refer more to him as a person.

"Ich habe Countrymusik gern" works better: the tone is something like "Country music is something I 'hold dear' / I enjoy very much".

Also, "Ich habe diese Farbe gern" = "I generally love this colour" sounds fine. But if you're commenting on the colour of a specific object, "Ich mag diese Farbe" = "I think this colour looks nice" would sound more natural.

"Ich mag dieses Messer" = "I like this knife, because it cuts so well". "Ich habe dieses Messer gern", on the other hand, sounds creepy to me :)

...not to be confused with "Ich verwende dieses Messer gern" = "I like using this knife; I often use it", which sounds perfectly normal.

August 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Treacle18

I used the phrase 'den schweizer Mann' and it is apparently ok, but I don't understand why it is not 'den schweizen Mann'.

January 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MortiBiRD

Your input was correct. The adjective schweizer does not get inflected at all. Your thoughts would be correct for most other adjectives that describe nationality. Der deutsche Mann, den deutschen Mann. der französische Mann, den französischen Mann, der englische Mann, den englischen Mann

January 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/az_p
Mod

    According to canoo.net, as an uninflected adjective shouldn't Schweizer be capitalised?

    Would the equivalent inflected adjective be another possibility? ... den schweizerischen Mann

    January 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Abendbrot

    According to the writing rules of today Duden shows the rule "D 90".

    D 90: "Von geografischen Namen abgeleitete Wörter auf -er schreibt man immer groß laut § 61

    • das Ulmer Münster
    • eine Kölner Firma
    • die Schweizer Uhrenindustrie
    • die Wiener Kaffeehäuser"

    So according to this rule, "den Schweizer Mann" has to be capitalised.

    ((Note: The rule before the writing reform said: a capitalised adjective shows a name(=Eigenname) or title like "Nürnberger Printen", "der Münchner Christkindl Markt", "das Münchner Oktoberfest"; other non-special names were uncapitalised like "münchner Kinder" or "nürnberger Kekse".))

    "den schweizerischen Mann" could be an theoretical alternative, but I do not think that many German, Austrian or Swiss people will use this posibility.

    January 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/MortiBiRD

    > According to canoo.net, as an uninflected adjective shouldn't Schweizer be capitalised?

    Canoo seems to be correct, Im stuck with the "old" (before the last reform) german.

    > Would the equivalent inflected adjective be another possibility? ... den schweizerischen Mann

    First, its correct how you would do it for the majority of things (or even new things). But in this case, you would sound very strange. Sure people still understand it but it sounds very strange.

    January 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Treacle18

    Thanks. Uninflected adjectives? Something I need to investigate.

    January 18, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/stepintime

    It's about geographic "property", which is constructed with that "-er" suffix: "the Berlin townhall" (= the townhall of Berlin) = "das Berliner Rathaus".

    "Der Schweizer" (= the Swiss person) literally would translate as "the one of Switzerland", like "der Hamburger" = "the one of Hamburg", as opposed to "der Deutsche" = "the German one" (deriving from an adjective, "deutsch").

    ...and indefinite: ein Schweizer, ein Hamburger (a citizen of Hamburg [or a cheeseburger without cheese]), ein Deutscher (a German [person]); ein Schweizer Auto, ein Hamburger Auto, ein deutsches Auto (a German car)

    ...and plural: die Schweizer, die Hamburger (the citizens of Hamburg), die Deutschen (the Germans); die Schweizer Berge, die Hamburger Berge (the mountains of Hamburg), die deutschen Berge (the German mountains)

    With "Schweizer" and "Hamburger", you get feminine forms like "(die) Hamburgerinnen" ([the] female citizens of Hamburg), while with nominalised "deutsch", you get the usual adjective forms: "die/eine Deutsche" (the/a German woman), plural for all genders: "die Deutschen".

    Same goes for cases: e.g. accusative "Ich habe den Schweizer/Hamburger Käse vergessen" vs. "Ich habe den deutschen Käse vergessen" (I forgot the Swiss/Hamburg/German cheese).

    As for the question of capitalising e.g. "Schweizer", see the other comments. Personally, I think "schweizer" looks strange and "hamburger" even a lot more so.

    January 19, 2018
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