https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN

Meine Tochter liebt ihren weichen Teddybären seit sie klein ist.

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Can I have an English translation? This is what I have so far. My daughter loves her soft teddy bear since she is (was?) small.

Thanks in advance, Susan

1 year ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

The sentence is in present tense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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I am not good unless you give me a sentence. So do you mean it is My daughter loves her soft teddy bear since she is small. Does this mean because she is small? And not, "since (the time) she is small?" I still don't get the exact meaning.

I am not sure what the writer is really saying.

Thanks, Susan

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drvdw
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I think that in English we would say „My daughter has loved her soft teddy bear since she was small“.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stepintime
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As others have said, it's "since [the time] she was small".

"since = because" never translates as "seit"; "seit" only refers to time - and also to space as in "We haven't passed a gas station for 100 km" (German, for the record: "Wir sind seit 100 Kilometern an keiner Tankstelle mehr vorbeigekommen").

"since = because" would be "da" or "weil".

On second thought, "...seit sie klein ist" sounds a bit illogical (assuming that the daughter isn't "small" anymore, which the phrase "since the time when..." would logically infer), but I'm not sure if it's actually wrong. It doesn't sound too wrong, at any rate...

Generally speaking, if the person still is what they were "back then", you use present tense: "Ich koche selbst, seit ich Student bin." = "I cook for myself since when I started being a student (which I still am)." If they're not a student anymore: "Ich koche selbst, seit ich Student war." = "I cook for myself since the days when I was a student."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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Thanks, you have answered my question just how I need it to be; and that is thoroughly, with examples.

Thanks again, Susan

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sweilan1

Okay, Susan. Let me take a crack at this. In German, this sentence is in the present tense, but in English we sort of put it in the past tense. Let me give you an example of another sentence. In English - I have been learning German for three months. But in German, it's Ich lerne Deutsch seit drei Monaten. Notice the English is version is past tense, but the German is present tense.

Hope this makes sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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I got it! Thanks.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edsanosian-II
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'Since' here indicates time and not the causative 'since' ... since that time, that it, for instance since 2010. teh causative since is used in contexts like, since (because) you are asking, I will answer. Good luck my friend :-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gmbka
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Could you say .... her soft teddy bear "ever" since she was small?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stepintime
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I'm not sure. I tend to think you could, but I think (although it's not exactly the exact same connotation and there's no German word to exactly translate "ever [since]"*) I'd use "schon seit" to represent "ever since" where it works:

"Sie liebt ihn schon seit sie ein Kind war" - "She has been loving him/it (the teddy bear) ever since she was a child"

but: "Ich lerne schon seit zehn Jahren Deutsch" - "I have already been learning German for ten years"

*(The thing is that - the way I understand it - "ever since" focuses on "all the time in between, without pause", while "schon seit" focuses on how long ago it began. Call it nitpicking.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drvdw
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Bären is not plural. It is singular. Bär is nominative and all the other cases are bären. You can tell it is singular because of „ihren weichen“. So it is „bear“ not „bears“

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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Is it singular because of weichen, or ihren weichen? What would make the sentence mean "teddy bears" plural?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drvdw
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It's really just the declination of the posessive pronoun, ihren, that immediately tells us it's singular. Since we know that what she loves, the object, is accusative, when we see ihren we know that that -en is the ending is for a masculine possessive pronoun in that case. If the noun was plural it would have been ihre.

An adjective following a posessive pronoun should use mixed inflection, and you can see that -en is the proper ending for masculine accusative, although -en would also have been the ending of the adjective if it was plural, in which case the sentence would be:

Meine Tochter liebt ihre weichen Teddybären seit sie klein ist.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slamRN
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Thank you so much.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mofalt
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Meine Tochter liebt ihren weichen Teddybären, seit sie klein ist.

My daughter has been loving her soft teddy bear since she was small.

Brief explanation: German does not take any present perfect progressive form ("has been loving") for describing states or actions which started in the past and are still continuing. Instead, the present tense is used ("liebt"). Therefore, in order not to have a present-to-past leap from one clause to the other, "seit(dem) sie klein ist" is in the present tense as well. Your version ("My daughter loves ... since she was ...") is not the best textbook example of (formal) English as well c-; .

The German word "seit" does not have synonyms in "da" or "weil". It is purely temporal, indicating the starting point of, well, whatever. It does not cover all meanings of "since". Just the temporal part, but never ever the "because" part. The only thing which may confuse you here is an archaic version of "Seite" or "Seit'". But you will not see it too often, so skip it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drvdw
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Being a native English speaker, I can tell you that that sentence sounds awkward and is unlikely to be said by a native speaker. “My daughter has loved her soft teddy bear since she was small” is the way a native speaker would convey the information.

1 year ago
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