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"Tengo una propiedad allí."

Translation:I have a property there.

5 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scottann

I was contemplating saying 'a property' except you would not say this in English. You might say 'a piece of property', in French 'une propriété' would mean an estate. Soooooo here goes one of my hearts. I am shedding them by buckets by the roadside as I 'camino'...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Where I am from in the USA people might say "a property"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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I'm not sure... I think I might hear "a piece of property" or simply "property", but I don't know about "a property".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

It must be regional. It's definitely okay where I am to say "a property" especially if it's a business of some sort or even an investment property. However for anyone doing the backwards lessons who doesn't speak english, they're right - 'a piece of property' will always sound okay but just 'a property' might sound odd depending on the context, and, apparently, the region.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scriptedreality

I would consider "property" to be an uncountable noun like milk or water. We might say "a bottle of water" but never "a water" However, if I was referring to a specific piece of property I would say "the property" as a short cut to saying "the piece of property" so it's a bit of a grey area.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JDBreeze1

One might hear it during a game of Monopoly :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

I would say that an state would be suitable. Of course, in some context it might not but... I wouldn't take a heart from you :P

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brian680683

I'm an English teacher you can absolutely say "a property" in English to mean "an estate/piece of property". In fact it is extremely common in the real estate industry where an agent is likely to refer to "the property" or perhaps "a waterfront property".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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I can see myself saying "a property" in the USA.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/morelangs

This is so me in Monopoly.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kennynica

"Tengo una propiedad ahí." This was marked wrong. I thought ahí and allí both mean there. Is there a distinction here?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jana80703

My old Living Language Spanish Coursebook says:

Aquí = "here" (-refers to something near the speaker).

Ahí ="there" (-refers to something near the person spoken to).

Allí "there" (-refers to something remote from both the speaker and the party spoken to).

Acá = "here" (-expresses motion toward the speaker -more commonly in Latin America and replaced by aquí in Spain).

Allá ="there" (indicates motion away from the speaker -more commonly in Latin America and replaced by allí in Spain).

It helps to picture yourself pointing in each instance {ie: to where you are, to where the party you're speaking to is, to a place remote from both of you, coming towards you, or going away from yourself (respectively to the definitions above).}

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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Thank you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

Is there a discernable difference between the pronunciation of 'ahí' and 'allí'?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Hm.. How odd, ahí and allí are just different spelling variations on the same word. Report it, you shouldn't have been marked wrong for that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jahcrooks

I read that ahi-there, Alli-over there

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Yeah, I've heard mixed responses as well, but what I learned in school was that "ahí/allí" are basically the same (they both mean "there"), while "allá" is the word that meant "over there", but maybe it depends on the region. This forum has mixed responses as well, the overall consensus is that "ahí"=there, "allá"=over there, but "allí" had mixed translations: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=37304

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JenniferLPhipps
JenniferLPhipps
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ahi means there alli means over there alla means beyond

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yoavtp
Yoavtp
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Am I the only one who can't here any difference between "allí" & "ahí" ? Even when listening to a Spanish speaker... Is there a big difference between the two?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jb4292
jb4292
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My guess is that if there is a difference, it's very subtle. Like alli might sound more like "a-yee" while ahi might sound more like "a-ee" (reminds me of the pronunciation of lee). One would have more "y" emphasis than the other. Again, just a guess.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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From my understanding, "allí" is used for things that are further away then "ahí", but I could be wrong. http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1029258

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PamelaDurk

in college, I learned alli was "over there."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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I learned "alli" was "there" and "allá" was "over there"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brian680683

Yes, in fact I just translated "allí" as 'over there' on the previous activity and it was correct but on this one it marked it wrong...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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"I have some property there." I think would be a better translation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lilgoff

Hmm "a property" sounds ok to me in the context of, "London? I have a property there." Though in the process of learning spanish I am re-learning English too!;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Telisa7
Telisa7
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I think you're right.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackie864625

Just "property" should be correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucilleHer1

It sounds strange to say a property in English. You can say , an estate, .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/satiricalIrony

Why can't you say, "I have property there"? I used it and it said it was wrong. Would it technically be incorrect? Please help me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CDaisyFunk

One would NOT say "I have 'a' property there" in English. The correct translation is "I have property there".

5 months ago