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  5. "Es cierto."

"Es cierto."

Translation:It's true.

March 19, 2013

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dirtygutta

Would "es verdad" mean the same thing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shraeye

You might say "es la verdad"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myachii

I'm thinking it might be European Spanish/Latin American Spanish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TexMexChica

I wrote, "It is sure." Hmm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeOpshin

"certain" also works


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivanaga

I always thought "that's right" was a viable translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fendue

Why is it not "it is right"? Does verdad = right and cierto = true?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

verdad = truth cierto = true ..... I think


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamescheng28

why not " it is right"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robibott

sorry can anyone explain me why "it is sure" is not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaStarr0

I also think of sure as being secure or certain. Not just a state of mind, but as in a mechanical sense. The bolt is sure, as in a sure hold.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

I think that Está seguro, would be better for "It (the bolt) is secure."

I think ¡Verdad! could mean "truth" in limited American idiomatic use. In some casual, regional slang, after a person says something others find to be a profound truth, and they agree that what s/he has spoken is truth, they might respond, "(It)'s truth!" followed by a fist bump &/or nodding of heads, just as a short way of saying, "That's the truth!"

There was a trend about 20 years ago when people might say "Word!" to show approval &/or agreement for a truth that was spoken, in much the same way. It was even said by the actor who played the son of the Danny Glover character in a "Lethal Weapon" movie, then awkwardly repeated by the father, who was trying to speak the son's slang to seem "cool."

It was mostly urban use, from my understanding, so not widespread enough to commonly use, but just to point out that it was used for a time in that manner.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffBramlett

To quote EleanorD1 below, "Sure" in its usual sense is a state of mind, not a state of affairs. It is possible to use "sure" in this sentence, but it's kind of unusual or archaic and it means "reliable" more than "true". Like "God's justice is sure".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skybanner

The phrase "For sure" has the same meaning. At least as a native (American) English speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

skybanner, I thought so also, and was surprised to learn that it meant "By the way"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miss.serena

Would "it's correct" also be a possibility?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Si_Robertson

verdad = truth cierto = true ..... am I correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henriettekarbo

why not : it is sure??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joan206534

Why is 'He is certain" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cornflake62

Why is "He is certain" not OK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ank_S

Why 'He is true' not true?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doc0048

Anyway "sure" can't be wrong, so even if it's not perfect, it's acceptable, I think... to say something else... "como" and "yo como", should be the same, but I wrote "yo como" and it's considered an error because the translation is just "como"... why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielDeik

Yo como is I eat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acazevedom

Why not "Its is right" can any one help me? English is not my native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moeka518

"It's" means "It is", so "It's is right" will be like saying "It is is right."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brhodewalt

Grammatically, you would say either "it is right" or "it's right." The meanings of "it is right" and "it is certain" are different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffBramlett

En ingles, "Its is right" es como decir "Esta es correcto" en español. In English, "It's" means "that thing is" or "That has" or "It is" if used as a contraction. "Its" means "That thing is owned by that other thing". http://www.its-not-its.info/ What is your native language? Someone here might be able to translate more accurately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GordonT2

Actually, you have them mixed up. [Its] is ownership. [It's] is short for it is. http://grammarist.com/spelling/its-its/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GordonT2

Also, [It's] is a contraction, not a conjunction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CliffBramlett

Thanks. I was trying to answer too quickly. Edited above to fix it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SilvaT.

I believe cierto means right and true.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/archon88

Doesn't seem to accept "it is correct"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

archon88, it may be a SURE thing that someone's pet dog, who thought you were going to harm its master (so is rushing toward your throat with its jaws open), is going to bite you, but that would not make it "correct." ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielDayot

cierto = certain = true :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oliviamariem6

"It's true", was not accepted, is "It is true" significantly different or is it a glitch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyRC3001

In Dothraki, it is known.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoelBShort

Cierto=true or certain BUT ALSO Por cierto= By the way (what is Por cierto literally?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

"Por cierto" has a closer meaning to "of course" or "indeed" (or "for sure" if you want to go really literal). You can use it to change the topic of the dialogue, as you do with "by the way".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/noraree

why isn't that is correct right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ogren_543

I said "It's correct" Is that not right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/buentiempo

I wrote 'you are true' - as in usted es, but that wasn't accepted. Should it have been?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DyN1pnHO

its for sure - should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skepticalways

DyN1..., Using "its" is the possessive form of "it" (unlike most other English words that use an apostrophe-"s" for possessives); to shorten "It is," you must use the apostrophe to show the contraction (the missing letter) of the Subject Pronoun and the Verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DyN1pnHO

You are absolutely correct - but I wonder if that's why it wasn't accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brhodewalt

Only nouns use an apostrophe-"s" for possessive. Pronouns consistently do not use apostrophes to show possessive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethelmary56

i thought it was verdad for true


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Ethel, verdad is the noun "truth". If you want to use the adjective "true", you'll usually go for cierto.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DyN1pnHO

Thanks - that has helped me a lot - so "es cierto" = it is true - "es la verdad = it is the truth. Am I on the right track here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Dyn1p, yes, that's correct. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DyN1pnHO

Thanks again


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pkingiam

Would "verdadero" work as well? Or is that a different sense of "true"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Pking, verdadero rather means "real, true, genuine" and it's mostly used as a descriptive adjective:

  • amidstad verdadera - true friendship
  • Los rumores son verdaderos. - The rumours are true.

Cierto is more along "right, true, sure". They are close in meaning but have different applications. You can say "Es verdadero", but it's far less common than "Es cierto".

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