https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kavinda14

EinEN Augenblick?

Why is it always stated in its accusative form?? Like even on bank ATM, it just states that. What would be the reason??

January 27, 2018

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobboK

Probably because it's short for the full phrase which uses a verb requiring the accusative. Perhaps "Gedulden Sie sich bitte einen Augenblick!"

January 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heike333145

This would be my reasoning, too (although, as a native speaker, I almost never think about why I say the things I say the way I say them ... ;-)).

There are similar expressions that must have evolved from complete sentences. For example, our greeting is

Guten Morgen! / Guten Tag! / Guten Abend!.

I think this accusative is used because it evolved from a complete sentence, too:

Ich wünsche dir/Ihnen einen guten Morgen!
Ich wünsche dir/Ihnen einen guten Tag!

January 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slamRN

Danke, jeder.

January 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stepintime

"Danke, alle" :) - I think the phrase only became a thing very recently, with some people, and to me, at least, it even has a tiny/potential flippant tone, but it's fine to write as a reply here. Standard language would be: "Danke euch allen" ("thank you all").

January 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

It typically appears in adverbial expressions of a small, definite amount of time, which is probably why you always see it in the accusative, as this is the case into which these time expressions tend to get put. If 'a moment' were the subject of a sentence, it would be 'ein Augenblick', as you'd expect.

January 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LFG183608

Possibly it implies something along the lines of "ich brauche einen Augenblick", in which case it takes the accusative? In English you would say "One moment" to mean "I need a moment."

January 28, 2018
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