1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Czech
  4. >
  5. "Jsme tady na pět dní."

"Jsme tady na pět dní."

Translation:We are here for five days.

January 29, 2018

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Essah_

does this sentence refer to future or past? It feels unnatural in the present tense in english we will be here for five days or we have been here for five days


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

"we have been here for five days" means we already spent five days here. I am not sure about the "we will be here for five days", but I think that means all five days from now.

The Czech sentence does not specify that. It means the current stay is planned to last five days, but you can say this on any of the days of the stay.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsarkarati

After reading the comments, it is still not clear what this sentence means. Which translation(s) would be correct: "We will be here for five days." OR "We have been here for five days." and may stay longer OR "We are here for five days." meaning that we are here already and our visit will last for five days. Or is it possible that all of these translations are possible given a specific context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

It means the current stay is planned to last five days, but you can say this on any of the days of the stay.

It could mean "We will be here for five days." only if you say it on arrival or on the first day of the stay.

It could mean "We have been here for five days." only if say that on the last day of the stay.

But really, the real meaning is the planned length of the stay. So "We are here for five days." meaning that we are here already and our visit will last for five days.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsarkarati

So from VladaFu's last explanation, it would seem that many translations are possible, depending on the meaning, which is unspecified. I would suggest that "We have been here for five days." be added as an accepted translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

That is just "Jsme tu pět dní." I know I said that it could meant that but still it is a different sentence. The "na pět dní" really does mean a planed length of the stay.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dsarkarati

Thank you. It makes sense now. The word "na" has a significant impact on the meaning. Could either "tu" or "tady" be used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Tu and tady are the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chris95041

Is this use of na to indicate a length of time (for five days) a construction that is acceptable for other lengths of time (na pět hodin, for example? na pět minut?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VladaFu

Yes, it is. "Na pět minut" is fine for something that is planned to take 5 minutes. "I need to go away for 5 minutes." "Musím na pět minut pryč."

Learn Czech in just 5 minutes a day. For free.