"The costume"

Translation:Il costume

March 19, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/VitaMorales

Costume in American English does not mean bathing suit as it does in Italian. Costume is something you wear to a masquerade. I'm not sure what the editors mean when they use this word.

July 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DiPri

Sono d'accordo. Il costume sono i vestiti per farsi il bagno in spiaggia, in summa è un bikini.

September 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidClarkII

Although a bit archaic, swimsuits were once commonly called swimming (or bathing) costumes. Regardless, this is a course to learn Italian. Discard preconceived ideas and accept that other languages are under no obligation to conform to "American English." (That sounds angrier than intended. But, I see way too many comments similar to this in the discussions/forums.)

April 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets

Yes, swimsuits were called "bathing costumes" or "swimming costumes", when men and women had to cover up nearly every part of their body at the beach (or risk getting arrested for "indecency"), and apparently the term is still in use to some extent in the UK. But in the US, we don't call modern swimwear "costumes"-- "costumes" are for masquerade parties, Mardi Gras, Carnaval, theatrical performances, Halloween trick-or-treating.

Also, this course is not just for people learning Italian. I am studying my languages from different language perspectives, not merely as a native English speaker. It helps to reinforce my language learning. So it seems to me that there are native Italian speakers who are using this course to reinforce their English :)

April 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidClarkII

Fair enough. I don't have a dispute with anything you're saying here. My point is still valid, in that rejecting swimsuit as a valid translation for the Italian word "costume" is rather short-sighted. It is comparable to saying that "ape" can't possibly be the word for "bee" because in English an ape is a much different animal. I appreciate your response. Continue learning and improving yourself.

April 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets

Thank you for the clarification. Have a lingot on me :)

April 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Gijsjevanbeek

what is the difference between costume and abito?

April 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/leo-ukraine

Why not l'abito?!

January 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/eleemar

Thought "il costume" and "la divisa" were interchangeable, but the latter triggered an error. Can anyone clarify?

March 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mukkapazza

Not quite. Divisa is more along the lines of a uniform, clothing with a specific activity in mind. Costume is more of an outfit, ensemble or a (cognate!) costume.

March 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lindaleone

If costume is masculine Why is it not Il costumo?

June 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sharkbbb

The noun/adjective singular ending is not always -o/-a. "costume" is derived from Latin cōnsuētūdō (ending in -o), but indirectly, via Vulgar Latin *costumen, simplified to "costume" as words in italian normally end in a vowel.

July 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MeroeOMER

Perhaps used more by the older English-speaking generation; "costume" was/is still used in ladies wear boutiques, to describe an outfit, possibly a suit or matching skirt and top, but not a single item of clothing. Sales assistant: "Madam, you may prefer this costume…"

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets

That sounds like British English. In American English, a costume is something that is worn on Halloween, or at a masquerade, or in a theatrical play, or at Mardi Gras. I cannot imagine an American sales assistant telling a woman she "might prefer this costume", unless she was specifically wanting something for a costume/masquerade ball.

April 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MeroeOMER

Dear Harey Wolf, I agree in that I cannot imagine an American sales assistant using "costume" in the way I have described above. Although certainly less often, this expression can still be heard in upmarket boutiques in Australia. That being said I do like your "costume"... the blue one with the white roll neck collar...

May 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets

LOL. You get a lingot for your "Hare-y Wolf" comment :)

And here you can see the "costume" of Harey Wolf in all its glory

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geNjI1VfDQ4

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MeroeOMER

Dear HW, Thanks so much for introducing me to this delightful character. I laughed out loud, very loud. Brilliant looney cartoonery…to coin a word!

June 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Janne203877

I've learnt the word il completo for mens costume.

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets

I think you mean a man's suit, or business suit.

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Janne203877

Yes I do. -English is not my oqn language, maybe I get the English costume wrong.

June 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/WolkZayets

A costume is usually a set of clothes that is worn in theatrical plays, or at certain kinds of parties (Halloween, Mardi Gras, costume parties, etc.) or to depict a style of clothing from the past (for example, at some historical museums). A woman's suit is still sometimes called a costume in British English, and British English sometimes calls swimwear "swimming costumes", while Americans prefer to say "swimsuits" or "bathing suits". :)

June 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Dave426966

The tool tip for costume says vestito, so I typed il vestito and that was, apparently, wrong! I don't mind that it's wrong, as vestito is a dress and not an appropriate translation - see that - but don't tell me it's right when I ask for help!

December 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/nibbysally

On my I pad I can’t get the start of the correct answer.

February 3, 2018
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