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https://www.duolingo.com/ExpatQuebe

Dutch and Afrikaans

Hello everyone! I was very curious if any of you decided to learn either of these languages if you already spoke the other. If so, has knowing either really helped you better understand the other? I ask this, because I've been learning Dutch much longer than Afrikaans, and I've surpassed Dutch by quite a lot. Afrikaans is definitely more simplified that Dutch is, but even the pronounciation, in my opinion, is more difficult that of Dutch. Does anyone have any favourite tools or other resources they use to learn Dutch?

7 months ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

Ek is Afrikaanse sprekend en vinde het Nederlands erg moeilijk. Did you understand that? I'm interested in how did Afrikaans develop from Dutch? My ancestors come to what is now Cape Town in the 1650 something. What happened to the Dutch that it got simplified so dramatically? Nederlandse mensen zal nooit Afrikaans leren, ze beschouw dit als een kinder taal.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Here are two good articles with regard to your question "What happened to the Dutch that it got simplified so dramatically?" : https://www.alsintl.com/resources/languages/Afrikaans/, https://www.pangeanic.com/knowledge_center/afrikaans-language/. Also, why do you say this: "Nederlandse mensen zal nooit Afrikaans leren, ze beschouw dit als een kinder taal."? It's probably true that most Dutch native speakers think Afrikaans is a simplified version of Dutch and to a certain extent it is. It developed from the South-Holland dialect of the Boers, who migrated to South Africa back in the 1600's. A lot of the so-called Dutch dialects or regional languages that are still spoken in the Netherlands today are considered less developed forms of standard Dutch or "boers" (the languages of rural people) if you will. It seems that Afrikaans is experiencing a surge in popularity and a number of people (including Dutch native speakers) have expressed an interest in learning it.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

I just wondered why so called Afrikaans is so simple compared to Dutch. The same did not happen with English or German in South Africa. Here in Pretoria I have heard German and understand a word here and there. The English have been here since 1800 somewhere and they haven't wrecked their language. Yesterday I read a view entries in Jan van Riebeeck's journal and could understand the gist of what they were doing, like unloading ships and struggling with the unreasonable locals like he said. Some of it was even funny, like the word "woei" for blowing wind, today I would use waai. Ik ben zo lui dat ik in het Engels schrijven, Nederlands laten mijn brein wakker schrikken, dat is beter dan blokraaisel invullen for de oude mense. Did you get that? Cross word puzzles=blokkiesraaisels.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hermesianax
Hermesianax
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Waai is Dutch too, woei is an alternative past tense form for waaide (:

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExpatQuebe

This is all true, but of course Afrikaans has a dark history behind it. Along with the Dutch in the 1700's, they came in and enslaved tens of thousands of people and forced them all to learn Dutch. This is how Afrikaans, if I am not mistaken, came to be. They didn't want to learn Dutch, they wanted something of their own in this hellish nightmare they were going through. So, they took Dutch, some English and other local native languages to (South) Africa, and created this awesome language. It has a dark history, but it gives me more respect for the language, because it was created by the men and women who struggled and faught for their lives. I had a book I bought some time ago that explained the history of Afrikaans. It was a lot darker than I had expected.

http://www.sahistory.org.za/article/afrikaner

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

Yes, my granddad use to farm in the south of what is now Namibia. He had Ovambo workers coming from the North were their tribal area was. They arrived skinny and by the time they went for the holidays they were not skinny anymore. The Africans also greatly increased because of the hospitals built with pale peoples money. Here in South Africa 90% of the farms taken back by Africans produce nothing and the people are still poor.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExpatQuebe

Ek het uitgekry dat ek ook baie Afrikaans gesin het in Greenpoint. Ek het hulle noggie ontmoet nie =/

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mededogen

One app that’s helped me a lot with Dutch is HelloTalk. You can talk to people who’s native language is Dutch, and it’s really motivated me a lot as I’ve made some great friends. You help them with English, and they help you with Dutch. I’d highly recommend it.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreffy
Kreffy
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If you're already a little further with Dutch, I would suggest watching the Dutch news. The words are pronounced very clearly - making it super easy to pick up the words. I speak from experience as I'm currently increasing my knowledge of the Swedish language by watching the news. Visit "https://www.rtl.nl/gemist/rtl-nieuws/" to watch the news that has been on television and some other (interesting) programs which could help you too. Also, if you want to read some news in Dutch I suggest going to "nu.nl" to read fresh articles daily. Hope this helps.

Oh and my native language is Dutch and I have a great interest to learn Afrikaans! I'm fascinated by the fact that I understand a lot of it written but I have a harder time listening. I really hope there will be an Afrikaans course on here too sometime soon. ^^

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

It seems to me that you have to pay to watch that news. I find Dutch more difficult than English, which is my second language. Mijn eerste taal is versleten Nederlands of gewoonlijk genoemd, Afrikaans. I find Dutch fascinating however, I don't really know why. It looks pretty in written form, like I like the ij instead of y in Afrikaans and the beautiful z words too.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtivanEer

nee hoor kost niks bv op uitzending gemist of tvblik of NPO

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WappyJohnn

www.npo.nl or www.nos.nl for news of the public channels, they should be available worldwide.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikki_SAOA

Afrikaans is my second language (although not used in 15 years), and I am finding Dutch relatively easy to learn - certainly easier than Spanish or Italian or French. I once had a Dutch person tell me that Afrikaans sounds like "children's Dutch". In terms of grammar, so far the main difference seems to be that Dutch has the de and het nouns (with implications for adjectives), verbs are conjugated (ik ben, jij bent, hij is, wij zijn compared to ek is, jy is, hy is, ons is) and spelling patterns are different (ij instead of y for instance). This may change as I progress, but right now I find I know about 95% of the vocabulary at least, and understand the word order instinctively. Pronunciation is a different story - I can only understand "real life" spoken Dutch if it is very slow, and I'm sure my pronunciation is terrible. To my ear Dutch has words which surprisingly end up sounding closer to the English than the Afrikaans. This doesn't necessarily help you, except to suggest that continuing with Afrikaans will build a vocabulary that you can take with you to Dutch.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

Very true! I listened to a interview on some Dutch news website. There were five people talking about separate sport for boys and girls. The was one adult, the coach and four children speaking, I could only understand one of the girls when she spoke Dutch and all the other people just a word here and there. To my Afrikaans ears that girl spoke clearly, but not slowly. I can read Dutch well but speaking and typing is a different matter.

7 months ago