"Je saisis sa lettre."

Translation:I grab his letter.

March 19, 2013

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/haseltin
  • 15
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

It sound like "seize". "say-zee" To help people remember the verb.

April 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/amakabeke

I thought so too

April 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamKir513325

Yea, kinda sounds like a Rap Star!

August 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarahschatje

I can't replace "grab" with "take"?

July 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AabLevellen

Take has its own verb: prendre.

March 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/EffingFancy

but are they not synonyms, at least in english?

August 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewCCarter

They are synonyms, but still different words--just like Prendre and Saisir

May 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/amy_ds
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Does saisis also mean grab as well as understand?

March 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/metajoke

there is a fairly direct english analog for saisis: "i grasp the meaning" vs "i grasp the object"

June 23, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ferynn
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13

"Saisir" is to grab, "Comprendre" is to understand. But in some cases you could say "J'ai saisi" to say "J'ai compris". But if it causes trouble, try not to. Stick to easy stuff :)

March 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/morganlockhart

I typed "I grasp his letter" and got it wrong. Shouldn't this be right?

January 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Nikitakimba

No. "Grasp" means to hold or clutch tightly (I grasp my dog from running away), or to understand (I grasp the concept you just explained). Grab means "to take" or "to grasp" it suddenly, quickly etc. Eg. He reached out to grab me, and grasped my arm, forcing me to stop.

February 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/alsocass

There is another sentence in this group that has the word 'saisis' in it and marks 'grab' as incorrect, the answer in that case is understand or know (I am actually trying to find it now so I can copy the example).

March 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/shalfyard

Savoir = to know Saisir = to seize

October 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/pythonenfrancais

Could you be thinking of Savoir? When I first saw "Je saisis..." I thought of "Je sais..." Savoir ("to know") isn't exactly the same as "to understand," but the concept is similar.

December 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Camerican

Yeah, this may be be confusion between savoir (to know) and saisir (to grab) since je sais / je saisis look so similar. As other users have stated, saisir can also be used figuratively to express "grasping the meaning of" something, i.e. understanding something.

August 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

It's the difference between a figurative reading (e.g. when referring to words) and literal reading (e.g when referring to a letter). Though in this case, since letters contain words, I suppose (but I'm not certain) that it could go either way. If it were chien and not lettre, then only the literal meaning would apply.

January 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordan_Stein

You're thinkinf of je sais

May 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/frenchbreadrules

So is there any rules as to when you use saisis or comprends?

April 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ferynn
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13

Roughly "Understand" = Comprendre, "I get the meaning of his talk" = "Je saisis le sens de..."

April 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/pensonalavenir

Je saisis sa lettre. Is this I grab his letter like I take his letter or does it mean I understand his letter?

July 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/wdawson65

I think it means TAKE in this instance.

August 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Jacen
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 9
  • 5

It's "sa lettre" because lettre is femininum right? Does that mean context the only way to know whether it's "his" or "her"?

May 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/kikki90

yes, you can only understand from the context, I suppose...

May 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/orlyc

sa = his, her, or the?

October 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/pythonenfrancais

It means either "his" or "her," but the gender refers to the gender of the object in question, not the gender of the owner. The gender of the owner would be known from context (which is not supplied on Duo).

December 3, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/fmstack

I'm a little disappointed that duolingo doesn't accept the standard english non-gender-specific third person singular here. (hi, I'm one of those cranks who is compelled to point out that even Shakespeare used "their" as a non-gender-specific singular.)

February 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AabLevellen

It is one of the challenges of translation: in French you cannot be gender neutral in some cases and has to be it in others, while in English you have a choice. It will therefore seldom be exact transferals of the intended meaning.

March 10, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/leth_marc
  • 25
  • 21
  • 15
  • 3

"Je saisis ça lettre" - is that grammatically OK? Is there a way to hear / know the difference?

May 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

It's not grammatically OK. Ça is not an adjective, so you know by process of elimination.

May 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/langlang

Then how would you go about translating "I grab that letter"?

July 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

«Je saisis cette lettre.»

July 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Aksynia

What about "I fetch her letter" variant?

January 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Grabbing/seizing isn't necessarily fetching. 'To fetch' is aller chercher.

February 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/taniamaria357577

Is it possible to use HER instead of HIS?

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mproctornz

Yep, that's fine too.

March 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jcboy14

I know take is prend(re), but why can`t the translation mean take as to the context?

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/smoothviking

Why is "I grabbed his letter" incorrect. That is how it would be spoken in English

November 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/shalfyard

"grabbed" is past tense and would use a different conjugation of saisir. If you are grabbing the letter right at that moment, "I grabbed his letter" would not be what you would say in either language.

November 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/DylanPond

How can you hear the difference between "Je saisis sa lettre" and "Je saisis ca lettre"?

December 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rbrightwell2

This was asked earlier and the answer was... there is no such thing as "ca lettre" (it letter). You might be thinking of "cette lettre" (this/that letter).

August 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/fengtasy17

i said to take his letter.... doesn't that count as grab? because pouvoir is only used for specific things right?.

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/shalfyard

To take is a different word (prendre I believe).

December 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mproctornz

"I grab their letter" should be an acceptable answer.

February 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/shalfyard

Why? Sa is his/her... leur is their.

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mproctornz

Because in English "their" can also refer to a the possession of a single person of any gender.

February 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/shalfyard

But "sa" in French does not translate to "their" in English...

February 26, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/neverfox

Show me where it says "their" for a translation.

You're missing the point, which is that more people (and dictionaries) should recognize the validity of the singular 'they' (and its forms like 'their'). That only proves that wordreference.com doesn't, not that they shouldn't.

What a word translates to depends entirely on how the target language conveys the same concept, i.e. singular, third-person possessive pronoun. If the singular 'their' is a valid and common way to express this concept, then it follows that "sa" translates to it. To the extent that isn't conveyed by wordreference.com then represents a failure on the part of wordreference.com to correctly reflect the way English is spoken, not a demonstration of the limits of acceptable translations.

March 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mproctornz

Sure it does. His, her, or their.

February 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/fonix5
  • 15
  • 14
  • 9

I understand the context of "Il ameliore sa lettre", but this sentence makes it difficult to know whether she is saying "ca" or "sa". Is there a hidden hint here?

February 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mjohnso108

i thought that sa was indicated feminine so if the sentence translates to his shouldn't the word son be used instead of sa

January 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

"sa" is a feminine adjective, agreeing with "lettre", feminine noun.

so his/her/its letter all translate to "sa lettre"

and his/her/its book all translate to "son livre", for "un livre" is masculine.

January 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Amegro
  • 14
  • 9
  • 5

When I see saisir in this context I think of typing. La saisie

December 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineWinslet
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 16
  • 262

"I grip his letter" - doesn't sound very good English to me!

May 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/liz.10.13.

What does sth mean? I don't think it's a word.

June 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

It's shorthand for "something".

March 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Maggie805349

i put "I grab his/her letter" and got it wrong!

September 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

You cannot use compacted forms with alternatives: "his letter" or "her letter" can be used alternatively.

September 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Hazhan1
  • 19
  • 181

How can i make it ( i grab her letter?)

October 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ujjwal_gyawali

Are sa and son same?

October 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 9
  • 8

"Sa, son" and "ses" are the possessive adjectives for a 3rd person singular owner (any gender).

Since they are adjectives, they agree with the noun they modify.

  • sa lettre (feminine singular) = his/her/its letter
  • son livre (masculine plural) = his/her/its book
  • ses lettres - ses livres (plural) = his/her/its books - his/her/its books
October 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/brandomanu1

How do i know "sa" is meaning "his" or "her"?

October 21, 2018
Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.