"Aspetto da agosto."

Translation:I have been waiting since August.

March 19, 2013

50 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sacredmaiden

"I am waiting since August"? The translation says "I have been waiting", but this is not present, which is what we have been using this whole time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ataylorex

This is an idiomatic construction using (verb + da + a period of time). For example, "aspetto da agosto" or "aspetto da molto tempo" would mean "I have been waiting since August" or "I have been waiting for a long time" respectively. It is definitely confusing because the "da" doesn't just change the sense of the phrase; it changes the entire meaning (as well as the tense). Its just one of those things you have to memorize and watch out for.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/catpb57

Thanks. Makes sense now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moon2224

Useful, thanks :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olefattguy

Yes, that should have been something with " aspettando", no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/magofa

My thoughts as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mlight

aspetto d' agosto ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marziotta

We shorten "da" seldom, almost never. We do it only on some given definitions, like "D'asporto" (but I would rather use "da asporto" anyway) and... cannot think of them, but if you never do it, you are never wrong. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

@might- I made the same mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atlasakin

Perfect. Duolingo expecting us to know the "have been" thing, before teaching it. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoniRankin

What does "I wait from August" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fJLo

Nothing. In English it doesnt make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeslam42

what about "aspetto SIN da agosto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/codevisio

sin is the truncation of sino. So the sentece would be "Aspetto sino da agosto".

The "da" clears says that it is a point in the past and not in the future.

"Sino" is used to express an ending point in time or space and the beginning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tuess

When it corrects me it translates it with "I'm waiting from August" ...which is totally different to the here given translation. Why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

Because that's the literal transliteration, not the best translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Transliteration and translation are two entirely different things.

Transliteration is nothing more than converting from one writing system to another. It has nothing to do with translating meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elena18

How would you say "I'm waiting for August" and/or "I can't wait for August"? (Could you say "Non vedo l'ora d'agosto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marymaryboberry

A good question! I have no idea how the literal translation would go over to a native speaker, but "I can't wait for August" would be "Non posso aspettare per Agosto." However, when in doubt, change your wording. "I'm excited for August" would be a sentence that both languages would accept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samirashokuhi

have been waiting, just waiting ,wait , past perfect present and... all becomes in one word in Italian?! "Aspetto" !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateMcCabe4

The "correct answer" in the exercise shows "I am waiting from August", which is not a natural English sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bruce55312

And it's not in English. But it does make sense in English nevertheless. DL is teaching idiomatic Italian. Be grateful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pete975877

How do you say 'I wait for (am waiting for(until)) August.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Indy4Italia

This is a limitation of this type of program. Tossing in a new verb tense without pointing out the new voice is a problem. I'm not sure it teaches us what it hopes to teach us by tossing this out and then leaving us to guess about it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard78640

Two points here. As it's still the present tense, it's not a new one. I also think that part of the DL method is that it aims to teach by making errors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anna98734

I thought that it must be an idiom when I went back to revise Time, but I wish it had been flagged up as an idiom at the time. In my opinion for what it's worth, we could have a few more examples of its use, on the trot, to stick the construction in our memory. it would emphasise the idiomatic nature of the phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeMMc18

I challenge the translation answers from time to time to see how much I can get away with. Today my translation was - I'm waiting since August. And it was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jason73043

would it not be "aspettavo" instead? why did i get this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silen03

Because "Aspetto da agosto" means you are still wating. "Aspettavo" means you don't anymore.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Because Italian says things differently than English does. Their sense of what comprises present tense does not perfectly align with how we divide it up in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregDAugustine

OK, but then how would you say "I wait for August"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElP75B

Would that be 'aspetto agosto'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JulieMarie64

Time phrasing is the hardest lesson yet for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael250419

...... then Duo should give an extra hint when revealing the 'correct' answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jerumin

what part of this sentence makes it past tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bilingualuna

How does aspetti become “ i have been waiting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Aspetto. And it's just a matter of how we say it in English vs how they say it in Italian.

"Have been waiting" is the present imperfect. "Aspetto" is the multi-tasking present simple.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard78640

Good explanation by Rae.F


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ohnotaras

Things like this and couple of other constructions of Italian are actually quite easy to understand having a knowledge of Slavic languages, because you can draw some parallels between them.

Actually, I am pretty happy being able of making those parallels both in English and my mother tongues, Ukrainian and Russian. Having this mentioned, I do find learning Italian way easier than other languages, be those French, which I failed, or Polish, that I keep half failing on a daily basis while living in Poland for a few years.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crollyanne

It certainly sounds like d'agosto'. Why can this not take an apostrophe - I am missing something here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaerAlain

Why can't I write "I wait for August"? How do I differentiate between present tense and past with something like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael250419

'Io aspettavo' if 'I have been waiting'! If Duo tries to teach differences between Italian and English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oceanmovement

I couldn't wait to see these comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjlingo

Yes, it's a frustrating experience when they expect you to have answers for stuff we did not learn yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/btS1tBLE

Why is da agosto and not d'agosto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrea986898

Why is it 'da agosto'? I thaught when double vocal should be redused to "d'agosto"??? Or "dall agosto"?

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