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  5. "Er hat einen Apfel."

"Er hat einen Apfel."

Translation:He has an apple.

March 19, 2013

39 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Just_Living

I heard "Ihr habt einen Apfel" after the introduction of "Ihr" in the last lesson ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milthorpe

The slow recording sounds very much like 'Ihr'. At normal speed it's more clearly 'Er'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrunkenOrc

I used "It has an apple" and duolingo marked me wrong :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ro_ha86

"It has an apple" would be "Es hat einen Apfel", so neuter. "Er" is clearly masculine, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelTro20

"It" refers to an object, so they cant have apples. Well thats what I think at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/billza7

"Er" is for masculine words which we have to only use 'he'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarthikaVi

The given sentence was 'Er hat einen Aphel', you must have mistaken it with 'Es hat einen Aphel'. Er is an usage for HE and Es is an usage for IT.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatAshe

"Es" means it. "Er" is masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SalarShushan

Did the same thing to me. Shouldn't that be a valid alternative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JJ1108

It's really hard to hear clearly Er and Ihr.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatAshe

Here, it is, but when correctly pronounced, there is a slight difference. "Er" is more breathy, and "ihr" makes more of a long "e" sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChickenRunner02

I agree. The machine does not speak clearly enogh. I thought it said IHR but it was ER.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kenshinji

It is really hard to tell Ihr and Er.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sypage

It sure sounded like "ihr" to me. They need to make it sound more clearly like "er."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChickenRunner02

Exactly!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Astefesterman

what is the difference between ein and einen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

You use "ein" in the masculine nominative case and "einen" in the masculine accusative case. Put simply, if a noun is masculine, and it's the subject of the sentence (as in, the doer of the verb action), it takes "ein", but if it's the direct object of the sentences (as in, the DIRECT receiver of the verb action) then it takes "einen". Example: "Ich esse einen Apfel" (I [subject] eat [verb] an apple [direct object]), but "Ein Apfel am Tag hält den Doktor fern" (an apple [subject] on the day keeps [verb] the doctor [direct object] afar).


[deactivated user]

    when to use habt and hat?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian
    • ich habe = I have

    • du hast = you have (informal, addressing one person)

    • er/sie/es hat = he/she/it has

    • wir haben = we have

    • ihr habt = you have (informal, addressing more than one person)

    • sie haben = they have

    • Sie (always capitalised!) haben = you have (formal, addressing one or more people)


    [deactivated user]

      i think ill never get du hast wrong, thanks rammstein


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauratesa

      is another verb hass from hate


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarthikaVi

      Thank you. It was of great help.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtcGam3R

      habt means have Hat means has


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatAshe

      Not exactly. It's just proper conjugation.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lauxa

      Would "He is having an apple" also be an appropriate translation here?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Milthorpe

      In English 'is having' is almost always used to mean something like 'is eating' or 'is using', so for example 'He is having an apple' would translate as 'Er isst einen Apfel'. I think 'haben' / 'hat' can only be interpreted in the possessive sense i.e. 'He is currently in possession of an apple.'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amoore98

      when to use hat and hast?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ro_ha86

      er/sie/es hat (third person singular - he/she/it has), du hast (second person singular - you have)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianKarap

      Ihr is clear... Er is not


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yuness.Hq

      Why we use Einen Apfel and not Ein Apfel ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

      You use "ein" in the masculine nominative case and "einen" in the masculine accusative case. Put simply, if a noun is masculine, and it's the subject of the sentence (as in, the doer of the verb action), it takes "ein", but if it's the direct object of the sentences (as in, the DIRECT receiver of the verb action) then it takes "einen". Example: "Ich esse einen Apfel" (I [subject] eat [verb] an apple [direct object]), but "Ein Apfel am Tag hält den Doktor fern" (an apple [subject] on the day keeps [verb] the doctor [direct object] afar).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexusD

      why is "he had an apple" a wrong translation and how could you tell?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian
      • Er hat einen Apfel = He has an apple

      • Er hatte einen Apfel = He had an apple

      http://www.canoo.net/inflection/haben:V:haben


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChickenRunner02

      Had is past tense. You need present tense ie has not had.

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